Tunisia | KBIA

Tunisia

AP Photo

In late June, the first Saudi women to legally drive a car in the kingdom started their engines and took off down the road.

The lifting of Saudi Arabia’s ban on female drivers was a step forward for women. But it’s just one of a number of recent steps forward for women’s rights in the Arab world.

Still, many women’s rights advocates are only cautiously optimistic. In some countries, laws aimed at helping women aren’t enforced. Nor are public attitudes toward women’s rights necessarily becoming more progressive.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at women’s rights in the Arab world.


European Press Agency

One of the hardest regions of the globe to be lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender is the Arab world. In Saudi Arabia and Yemen, the punishment for the crime of sodomy is death by stoning, and many other countries impose prison sentences.

Also challenging is the fact that the stigma associated with being LGBT is so great, many people feel they can’t come out even to their family or closest friends.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the uncertain lives of LGBT people in Arab nations.


European Press Agency

After Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from Libya in 2011, there was hope for a peaceful and democratic future in one of Africa's largest oil-producers.

Five years later, the country is divided among warring militias. Amid the power vacuum, the Islamic State has gained a foothold from which to launch terror attacks and human traffickers have made Libya a major transshipment point for migrants to Europe.

On this week's edition of Global Journalist, a look at how Libya came apart and how it may be put back together.


AP

The Arab Spring toppled long-ruling autocrats across the Arab world. But with Libya in chaos, Egypt back under military rule and Syria and Yemen engulfed in war, only Tunisia has fulfilled the promise of its revolution.

With a new constitution, successful elections, and a Nobel Peace Prize for pro-democracy groups, there is much to celebrate. Yet Tunisia also faces major economic challenges and a growing threat from the Islamic State's Libya outpost.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the lone democracy to emerge from the Arab revolutions of 2011 and 2012.