Voice of America | KBIA

Voice of America

This week on Views of the News, a look back – and a look ahead – from the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Also, a Voice of America reporter is reassigned after questioning Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and Vogue editors defend their February cover, a portrait of Vice President-Elect Kamala Harris some say is too casual.

Photo of a building entrance with a brass sign reading "Voice of America" next to it
Andrew Harnik / AP

Over the summer, at the insistence of President Trump, the Senate confirmed Michael Pack as the new director of U.S. Agency for Government Media.

Since then, the venerable Voice of America and its sister broadcast outlets have been plunged into chaos.

MU Journalism School students talked to two former VOA directors, a reporter fired by Pack and a lawyer for the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press about the chaos enveloping what has been one of the nation's most effective vectors for "soft power."


Courtesy KMGH-TV

A man on contract to provide security for a Denver television station shot and killed a man during a demonstration and counterprotest Saturday. Do journalists need armed security while on assignment? And, how is 9News covering the story without incurring a conflict of interest?

Reporter recording under a blanket
Courtesy Aqil Hamzah

Students in a Missouri School of Journalism multimedia class taught by Professors Kat Lucchesi and Major King started their spring semester thinking they were going to do a series of podcasts about a faraway pandemic.

Then it hit home, scattering the team across the country — and, in one case, beyond — and depriving them of access to the equipment they'd normally use to create their programs.

While interviewing professional journalists about how they keep their cool in the face of crisis, the reporters and producers of this story got a test of their own resilience. 


Reporters wearing medical masks raise hands to seek recognition at a Beijing press conference.
Wu Hong / European Pressphoto Agency/EFE

During the coronavirus outbreak, Global Journalist is talking to some of the workers on the frontlines. They don't always get the recognition of doctors and nurses, but journalists also are risking — and in some cases — giving their lives to get information to the public.

In this first in a series of podcasts. Missouri School of Journalism students interview a Voice of America reporter how he navigated China's closed society to report on the outbreak.