Yemen | KBIA

Yemen

AP Photo

In late June, the first Saudi women to legally drive a car in the kingdom started their engines and took off down the road.

The lifting of Saudi Arabia’s ban on female drivers was a step forward for women. But it’s just one of a number of recent steps forward for women’s rights in the Arab world. Countries like Tunisia, Jordan and Lebanon have passed laws ending legal loopholes that let rapists off the hook for marrying their victim.

Some countries have rolled back exemptions for those who commit so-called “honor killings” of female family members.

Still, many women’s rights advocates are only cautiously optimistic. In some countries, laws aimed at helping women aren’t enforced. Nor are public attitudes toward women’s rights necessarily becoming more progressive. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at women's rights in the Arab world.


AP Photo

The struggling nation of Yemen is on the brink of what could become the worst famine the world has seen in decades.

The country’s economy has collapsed amid a three-year-old war between a Saudi-led coalition and Houthi rebels. About 8.4 million are what the UN calls “severely food insecure” and at risk of starvation.

To make matters worse, it’s increasingly clear that the humanitarian disaster in Yemen isn’t an unintended side effect of the war - but a deliberate effort to starve the population.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a closer look at the three-year-old crisis in Yemen - and why more isn’t being done to end the world’s worst humanitarian disaster.


(White House)

Saudi Arabia's 32-year-old crown prince has already shaken up both Saudi Arabia’s internal politics as well as its foreign relations.

Mohammad bin Salman has detained prominent members of the royal family and businessmen after accusing them of corruption. He’s lifted restrictions that barred women from driving or operating businesses. He’s outlined a bold plan to wean Saudi Arabia’s economy from oil dependence.

But bin Salman has also escalated Saudi Arabia’s war in neighboring Yemen, triggering one of the world’s worst humanitarian crises. He’s feuded with nearby Qatar and Lebanon and intensified Saudi Arabia’s rivalry with its historical foe, Iran. Even Canada hasn't escaped his wrath.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at a prince upending the politics of both Saudi Arabia and the Middle East. 


AP Photo

In late June, the first Saudi women to legally drive a car in the kingdom started their engines and took off down the road.

The lifting of Saudi Arabia’s ban on female drivers was a step forward for women. But it’s just one of a number of recent steps forward for women’s rights in the Arab world.

Still, many women’s rights advocates are only cautiously optimistic. In some countries, laws aimed at helping women aren’t enforced. Nor are public attitudes toward women’s rights necessarily becoming more progressive.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at women’s rights in the Arab world.


UNESCO

Conflict in the Middle East and elsewhere has fueled a booming trade in looted antiquities from archaeological sites and museums.

Millions of dollars worth of artifacts have disappeared, with some resurfacing for sale in Europe and the United States.

The black market trade provided tens of millions of dollars of funding for the Islamic State, one of the largest groups involved in the business. With ISIS nearing defeat, archaeologists are looking for ways to halt the trade in looted artifacts from Syria, Iraq and other conflict zones.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss the trade in stolen cultural artifacts.


Almigdad Mojalli / VOA

The civil war in Yemen has garnered many superlatives since it began in force in March 2015. It's generated the world's most dire humanitarian crisis and the largest cholera outbreak in a single year ever recorded – even Forbes ranked its economy as the world's worst

Yet despite a conflict that has left 7 million on the brink of starvation, there is little end in sight to fighting between Iranian-backed Houthi rebels and the country's Saudi-backed government. Attempts to spur a U.N. investigation into war crimes committed by both sides have so far failed. Complicating efforts is support for the Saudi-backed government by the U.S., U.K. and France. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss Yemen's humanitarian crisis, the collapse of independent media in the country and the role of outsiders in fueling a conflict that has generated startling levels of human suffering. 


Asmaa Waguih

Civil war in Yemen has forced more than 3 million people from their homes and left millions more in need of food and other humanitarian aid.

With the recent failure of UN-backed peace talks, the situation is unlikely to ease.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the crisis in Yemen and Saudi Arabia's controversial airstrikes in the country that have worsened the plight of its desperate people.


AP

The conflict in Syria gets the headlines, but 2,000 miles south in Yemen a separate civil war has brought an already impoverished country to its knees.

More than 80 percent of the country's population is in need of humanitarian aid - aid many can't get because of the fighting.

As Shia rebels backed by Iran have battled the country's Saudi Arabia-backed Sunni government, al-Qaida and the Islamic State have taken advantage of the chaos to expand their influence.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the humanitarian and political crisis in Yemen and the threat posed by international extremist groups in the country.


Yemen on the Brink

Mar 19, 2015
Hani Mohammed / Associated Press

The small Arabian peninsula nation of Yemen has gone through a lot of turmoil in the past decade. One president was ousted in 2012 during the Arab Spring, in January a second was overthrown by the Houthis, an Iranian-backed militia. Meanwhile al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, perhaps the terror group's most deadly affiliate, has seized the opportunity to expand its presence in Yemen.

What is the future of this country, and what does it mean for the West if it becomes an Iranian ally or descends into Somalia-style chaos?

Update, at 8:10 p.m. ET

Yemen's besieged president appeared to have acceded to demands by Shiite Houthi rebels, potentially defusing a political crisis that has engulfed the U.S. ally.

The rebels had seized the presidential palace and surrounded President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi's home, which is in a different part of the city. Hadi himself was unharmed.