Abby Ivory-Ganja | KBIA

Abby Ivory-Ganja

Student Producer

Today on Intersection, we’re sharing interviews with local authors coming to the Unbound Book Festival this weekend, and also exploring concerns about diversity and expression at the festival. Unbound is a three-day event that brings authors from all over the world to Columbia to talk and share insight on their work. The event runs from April 19 to the 21, and will be held in venues across Columbia, including The Missouri Theatre and Stephens College. This year's headline speaker is author Zadie Smith.

As we put together this show, we learned of people voicing concerns over diversity and inclusion at the Unbound Book Festival, particularly on several panels with all white participants. 

Ibtisam Barakat, a Palestinian-American author, posted a statement to Facebook about a week ago saying she was encouraged by these discussions to reveal racism experienced while participating in an Unbound panel last year. Barakat talked with producer Abby Ivory-Ganja about her experience. Sara Shahriari spoke with festival organizer Alex George about what will change for the festival going forward.  


Five seats on Jefferson City's City Council and two seats on the Board of Education for Jefferson City Public Schools were up for election on Tuesday.

Jon Hensley won the only contested race for City Council in Ward 5. He came in with 46 percent of the vote against Jim Crabtree and Ashley Jones-Kaufman. Hensley currently serves as general counsel at the Missouri State Treasurer's Office. He said he hopes to address some of the points in his campaign platform as a council member. 

True False logo
File Photo / KBIA

Today, we're looking back at a few popular films from the True/False film festival. We spoke with six filmmakers about the process behind their films and what they hope audiences gain from their work. 

The films cover a range of topics, from the father-son relationship within a radical jihadist group, the nature-nurture debate and the loss of Singapore's first independent film. 

Our producers talked with the directors of Primas, Shirkers, Black Mother, Antonio e Catrina, Three Identical Strangers and Of Fathers and Sons. 


True/False

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

In the summer of 1992, Sandi Tan and two of her best friends set out to make Singapore’s first independent film. Just teenagers at the time, they were helped by their enigmatic American mentor, Georges. The film was Shirkers, a story about a teenage killer named S, who goes on the search for five people she likes enough to kill.

After a summer of shooting, Georges disappeared with all the footage, devastating Tan and her friends. 20 years later, the film is rediscovered in near-perfect condition. In this film, also called Shirkers, Tan travels from Singapore to California to New Orleans to retrace what happened and revisit her youth.


True/False

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

In Bisbee ‘17, director Robert Greene examines the past’s influence on the present in Bisbee, Arizona, a town seven miles from Mexico. During the early 1900s, Bisbee was home to an influential copper mining camp. In 1917, union workers, largely immigrants, went on strike, and as a result, 1,200 workers were rounded up at gunpoint and were deported across state lines. Greene said he wanted to “rattle the ghost’s cage” to see how an event that took place a century ago is still affecting the town.

 

 


True/False

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

Directors Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Verena Paravel wanted to tell the story of a cannibalistic man without the typical sensationalism surrounding cannibalism. One goal of their documentary "Caniba" is to have the audience intimately engage with someone they would typically write off as a monster. 

 


T/F film festival

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

“Of Fathers and Sons” explore the love two sons have for their father, a Jihadist fighter.

To make this film, Syrian director Talal Derki posed as a war photographer sympathetic to jihadists and their ideology. The result is a documentary about family, innocence, war and radicalization.


True/False

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fes​​t.

Primas tells the story of two cousins who experienced sexual violence as teenagers and their journey of healing through art. Director Laura Bari followed cousins Rocio and Aldana from Argentina to her home in Montreal over the course of the film. 


True/False

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

La Flor de La Vida follows 83 year-old Aldo and his wife Gabriella as they move on from their divorce after 50 years together. Old age is normally seen as a time of endings, but directors Adriana Loeff and Claudia Abend wanted to challenge that notion.

 


True/False

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

Individuality in personality can often be taken for granted. In Three Identical Strangers, Director Tim Wardle tells the story of Robert Shafran, David Kellman, and Eddy Galland. The three men are triplets, separated at birth who reconnect later in life by pure chance. The film explores the nature vs nurture debate and what it means to be an individual. Three Identical Strangers takes the audience on a journey exploring the darkness of human curiosity in an eerie, complex and unimaginable tale.


True/False

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

Director Khalik Allah travels through Jamaica following one woman's pregnancy through the birth of her child. The film employs artistic cinematography to show Jamaican culture. Although Allah’s maternal family still lives in Jamaica, he chose to explore parts of the island he was unfamiliar with in an adventurous and complex film.


True/False

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

Director Stephen Maing weaves together the stories of a group of whistleblower cops, a private investigator and a young man who says the police framed him. Maing says he set out to create a portrait of a community in “Crime + Punishment.”


Erick Stoll and Chase Whiteside

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  

Directors Erick Stoll and Chase Whiteside took up residency in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, intending to make a film about tourism. Instead, a chance meeting at a party led them to the story at the center of América. It’s a film about caretaking, complicated family dynamics, and the bond between three brothers and their grandmother, América. 


Locarno Festival / Sailas Vanetti

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  

When Cristina Hanes traveled from her home country of Romania to Lisbon, Portugal to study film, she did not expect to meet Augusto. The 70-year old man, whom she describes as largely shut out from the world, lives alone in central Lisbon. Hanes’ film, Antonio e Catarina, chronicles their relationship throughout the course of Hanes’ studies. As the conclusion of her time in Portugal draws near in the film, Hanes says the two characters face a deadline that will certainly end their relationship.

T/F Film Festival

 Today, we’re talking with four True/False filmmakers about the inspiration behind their documentaries and what they hope audiences learn from their films. The documentaries cover a range of topics including aging, deportation and policing.

 

The True/False fest starts Thursday, March 1 and ends Sunday, March 4. Over the course of four days, 45 films will be shown. You can find a complete list of films on the T/F website.

 


Nathan Lawrence/KBIA

Today on Intersection, we're exploring some of the fascinating cultural events in Columbia this month. We hear about journalism meeting civil rights history and theater in The Green Duck Lounge, the major international photography competition POYi, and get some insider views on True/False films. 

 


Netflix

This week on Intersection, we bring you an episode of the True/False Podcast, which is a collaboration between the True/False Film Fest and KBIA. The podcast showcases in-depth conversations with documentary film directors, and today we hear from director Kitty Green. Her documentary, "Casting JonBenét," was shown at last year’s True/False Film Festival and is now streaming on Netflix.


photo of Junot Diaz
Nina Subin

This week on Intersection, we bring you excerpts from author Junot Díaz's Jan. 22 talk at MU.

Díaz won the 2008 Pulitzer prize for his first novel, "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.” He received a MacArthur 'Genius' Fellowship and co-founded the Voices of Our National Arts Foundation, which holds workshops for writers of color. He is a professor of writing at MIT.

Díaz immigrated from the Dominican Republic to the United State when he was six. In his literary work and activism, he tackles issues including immigration, assimilation and oppression.

 

His speech was part of the MU Celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. event. During the talk, Díaz spoke about white supremacy, the role of artists and the lasting effects of slavery.

 


Today, we're talking with three mid-Missouri authors - Mary Collins Barile, David Crespy and Brian Katcher. They've written plays, books on local folklore and young adult novels.


Columns and Jesse Hall
Adam Procter / Flickr

UPDATE: As of 4:17 p.m., MU Alert reports that the bomb threat has been cleared. No suspicious or explosive device was found. Campus is back to operating under normal conditions. 

MU Alert reported a bomb threat at the Hearnes Center shuttle bus stop at 3:37 p.m. Police are investigating.

The bus stop has been evacuated and traffic is being rerouted. MU Alert is advising people to stay away from the area.

Kristofor Husted/KBIA

Today, we’re bringing you United and Divided, a series of stories on bridging the urban-rural divide. It's reported by Harvest Public Media.

In the wake of the 2016 presidential election one thing is clear: rural America and urban America see things differently. In this series of profiles, Harvest Public Media reporters introduce us to our fellow Americans and examine the issues that they hold dear. We re-discover the ties that bind us and learn more about the lines that divide us. And through these voices, we come to know Americans just a little bit better.

Reporters from Missouri, Colorado, Iowa and Nebraska explore topics causing rift in the country, and how those differences define the future. They looked at schools, religion, immigration and trade policy. 


Courtesy Anton Treuer and Bemidji State University

November is Native American Heritage Month. This week author and professor of Ojibwe at Bemidji State University Anton Treuer talks with host Sara Shahriari. MU professor of digital storytelling and citizen of Cherokee Nation Joseph Erb joins in the wide-ranging conversation on language's role in maintaining a culture, Truer's book Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask, and the damage done by some mascots that mimic Native Americans. 


KBIA

Rural areas throughout the state, and areas around the country, are facing hospital and veterinary service closures. KBIA’s Abby Ivory-Ganja spoke the University of Missouri Professor of Food Animal Medicine and Surgery John Middleton about how the university’s College of Veterinary Medicine is working to incentivize students to work in rural areas.


Sara Shahriari/KBIA

This week on intersection we are joined by Dr. Rebecca Johnson. She is the Millsap Professor of Gerontological Nursing and Public Policy Professor at the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing. She's also a professor and serves as the director of the Research Center for Human Animal Interaction in the MU College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Johnson researches how people and pets interact, including the beneficial effects animals can have on people and the science behind it all.


Beatriz Costa-Lima / KBIA

Welcome Home is a transitional emergency and service center for veterans. The organization has been operating in Columbia for more than 25 years, and recently expanded. The mission? To reduce veteran homelessness by helping people gain housing, services and skills to form stable lives. 

Intersection's Sara Shahriari sat down with Timothy Rich, the executive director of Welcome Home, to learn about the organization and its new facilities.


Photo courtesy of T.J. Thomson

This week on Intersection we are joined by Jim Obergefell , who was the plaintiff in the landmark Supreme Court case that legalized same-sex marriage. Obergefell visited the University of Missouri earlier this month to present a lecture called “Love Wins” for a symposium on the Science of Love. Timothy Blair also joined the conversation. Blair is an alumnus of the Missouri School of Journalism, and in 2015 he donated $1 million to create the Timothy D. Blair Fund for LGBT Coverage in Journalism. 

Missouri Task Force One

Missouri Task Force One is an urban search and rescue team that responds to disasters around the country. There are just 28 such units nationwide, and the Missouri force is managed by the Boone County Fire Protection District. A Missouri Task Force One team recently returned to Columbia from Texas after helping with Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. 

Intersection's Sara Shahriari sat down with two members from the task force, Terry Cassil and Danny Mueller, to hear about their experiences. 


Benjamin Hoste

Lead has played a pivotal role in the history of Missouri. More than 17 million tons of lead have come out of the ground in the state over the last 300 years, and that's left a lasting impact on the state economically, environmentally and culturally. KBIA is exploring that history —and future—in our special series The Legacy of Lead.


Benjamin Hoste

Next week on Intersection, we look at Missouri's legacy of lead. In this preview of our upcoming show, Intersection host Sara Shahriari talks with photographer Benjamin Hoste about his images from Missouri's old lead belt. 

Hoste's photographs from the old lead belt are on display at the Greg Hardwick Gallery at Columbia College through September 27.

Sara Shahriari / KBIA

Intersection is marking the new school year with conversations with three MU professors whose work and teaching styles make then stand out. We learn that parts of Missouri were once on the coast of a huge inland sea, how a veterinarian and toxicologist gets to the bottom of mysterious ailments and how students are learning to understand the global market for fabrics. 


Pages