election 2016

Kip Kendrick / Missouri House

In District 44, Democratic incumbent Kip Kendrick won his race for District 45 Missouri State Representative against independent William Lee with more than 70 percent of the vote. Kendrick says that the parties need to come together now more than ever.

“There are so many issues facing this state, facing this nation that are non-partisan that affect everyone. We’ve got to get back to that. We’ve got to turn down the rhetoric. We’ve got to start healing this nation and healing this state," Kendrick said.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Missouri voters passed Amendment 6 Tuesday to become the eighth state to require a photo ID to vote. 

Amendment 6, which requires voters to show a state, federal or military issued ID to cast a ballot, passed with 63 percent of the vote.

Sarah Kellogg

Residents all over the state of Missouri cast their ballot for the next president on Tuesday. In what’s been called one of the most polarizing elections in history, Residents at watch parties in Columbia and Jefferson City talked to KBIA reporters about their reactions to Donald Trump winning the presidency.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

A former Navy SEAL will be the next governor of Missouri. Republican Eric Greitens defeated Democratic attorney general Chris Koster by a wide margin.

Despite polling well behind Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump in the Missouri, Greitens rode the same wave of anti-establishment anger to a convincing win.

“Tonight we did more than win an election," Greitens said. "We restored power to the people and we took our state back.”

But Greitens pledged to serve those who had supported his opponent as well. Koster, for his part, urged the two parties to cooperate.

Lexie Stoker / KBIA

The Cole County Republican watch party at the Millbottom in Jefferson City saw many different candidates and elected officials make appearances.  Jeff Hoelscher was there for the whole night and was reelected as the Eastern District Commissioner for Cole County.  He said that he was thankful people trusted him enough to give him a third term.  When asked about goals, he said “I think one of them is going to be the employee salaries, we want to be competitive try and keep good employees.

Kander Casts His Vote in Columbia

Nov 8, 2016
KBIA / Kristofor Husted

Missouri Secretary of State and U.S. Senate candidate Jason Kander started out his Tuesday campaigning in St. Louis, then began making his way to Kansas City to finish his statewide campaign. He did make one pit stop, though, in his home town of Columbia to cast his own ballot.

Kander, a Democrat, cast his vote around noon at Community Methodist Church in Columbia. He has returned to this location to vote for several years and says that he recognizes many of the volunteers.

“It’s pretty exciting,” he said.” We have all the momentum in the race. We really feel that we have the lead in the race. It’s really about making sure people get out to vote,” Kander said he was happy to vote with his wife and son. “My three year old has been wishing everyone a happy election day so, we’re having a pretty good time,” Kander said.

New Poll Predicts Close Races for Missouri Elections

Nov 8, 2016
KBIA / Kristofor Husted

A new poll predicts Missouri election results for may come down to the wire.

According to a Monmouth University Poll, Missouri elections are so close, candidates for the U.S. senate and governor are polling within 1 percent or less of each other.

The poll places incumbent Republican Senator, Roy Blunt, holding a 1 percent lead to Democrat Jason Kander. The numbers show Blunt polling at 47 percent, Kander at 46 percent and Libertarian Jonathan Dine at 2 percent of the vote.

The race for governor is even closer: a virtual tie. The poll has Democratic Attorney General Chris Koster and Republican Navy SEAL Eric Greitens each at 4

6 percent of the vote and 2 percent for Libertarian Cisse Spragins.

The races are so close it has many voters choosing people instead of parties.

Many MU students stopped by multiple voting stations on MU campus including Memorial Union and Reynolds Alumni Center to make their voice heard in a crucial election that can reshape the country’s political climate.

Some of the students waiting in line were first-time voters for president. Industrial engineering sophomore Conner Brown said participating in the general election made him “feel like an adult.” Brown holds a negative view on this year’s candidates. “I think that the candidates this year just don’t accurately represent the American population,” he said.

KBIA / Kristofor Husted

Voters are finding long lines around Missouri while turning out for an election that will reshape the state's political landscape. Missouri election officials had predicted record turnout even before voters began heading to the polls Tuesday.

In St. Louis, lines formed before dawn. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that some voters arrived an hour before the polls opened. Across the state, The Kansas City Star reports unusually long lines in some areas. Fifty-six-year-old Jim Duff says the line he encountered at a south Kansas City church is the longest he's ever experienced.

KBIA/Kristofor Husted

Professor of law and journalism at the University of Missouri Richard Reuben discusses Constitutional Amendment 6 in Missouri, which appears on ballots today. KBIA's Molly Olmstead spoke with Reuben about how the proposed amendment could impact identification requirements for future voters, and how it relates to past voter ID laws. 


roy blunt
TalkMediaNews / Flickr

In eight previous elections for federal office, Roy Blunt has never had a close race. He appears to be facing one now.

Missouri voters on Tuesday will decide if Blunt, a Republican who was elected seven times to the House before easily winning election to the Senate in 2010, can fend off Democratic challenger Jason Kander.

Dave Ingraham / Flickr

Two former party-switchers are running to become Missouri's next governor, but that's where the similarities end in the race between Democratic Attorney General Chris Koster and Republican former Navy SEAL Eric Greitens.

The race to succeed Jay Nixon and lead state government is coming down to a vivid choice between experience and a fresh start.

Talking Politics : Missouri Campaign Finance Reform Raises Concerns

Nov 7, 2016

Missouri is one of only 12 states that does not have limits on campaign finance.

On Nov. 8, citizens will be voting on five amendments to the Missouri Constitution. Amendment 2 will establish limits on campaign contributions to candidates seeking office. If put in place, individual donors in Missouri will no longer be able to donate millions to campaigns. Currently, donors can give any amount they see fit as long as they follow the rules established by the Missouri Ethics Commission.

Clay Masters / IPR

With the legal battle raging over the implementation of controversial Obama Administration clean water rules, the next president is likely to face the daunting task of formulating a comprehensive plan to cut-down on water pollution from Midwest farms.

Harvest Public Media reporters attempted to answer your questions about how the presidential candidates’ positions on food and farm issues would change our food system. 

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

In this series, Harvest Public Media reporters attempt answer your questions about the 2016 presidential election.

We received a few questions about the candidates’ views on GMOs, and the use of biotechnology in agriculture. While neither the Clinton nor the Trump campaign responded to requests for comment, here's what we know about the candidates’ views on some of the biggest issues related to biotech in farming.

Abby Wendle / Harvest Public Media

In this series, Harvest Public Media reporters attempt answer your questions about the 2016 presidential election.

We received many questions about the role of farmers in crafting the policies that affect our food system.

William Powers of Ceresco, Nebraska asked: How can farmers, both young/beginning & established, have a seat at the table so to speak, in regards to policy decisions and other issues relating to food and farming.

Eric Durban / Harvest Public Media

In this series, Harvest Public Media reporters attempt answer your questions about the 2016 presidential election.

Rick Leidig of Kansas City, Missouri asks: "An essential element of agriculture on any level is a sustainable supply of water. What policies would you propose to protect declining resources like the Ogallala Aquifer? It's huge, there's been little public discussion and it's not going away."

Rick is right that portions of the Ogallala have seen persistent depletion from farm irrigation, particularly in parts of western Kansas.

Wikimedia Commons

As a farmer and a member of the House Agricultural Committee, Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler’s stance on agricultural issues are often tied with her desire for less federal government involvement in state issues.

She said restrictions from organizations like the Environmental Protection Agency are taking money away from Missouri farmers. Hartzler pointed to changes in certain EPA regulations, such as the Waters of the U.S. These changes have made it, she said, so that “the federal government will control ninety-nine percent of the land.”  

For the first time in 12 years, someone besides Peter Kinder will be lieutenant governor of Missouri.

Kinder jumped into the governor's race and lost in a crowded Republican primary, coming in third in a contest won by Eric Greitens. The major party candidates on the Nov. 8 ballot are Democrat Russ Carnahan and Republican Mike Parson.

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies are pleased to welcome back Democratic attorney general nominee Teresa Hensley to the program.

Hensley is squaring off against Republican Josh Hawley in the general election for attorney general. Hawley recorded an episode of the podcast last week that can be found here.

Updated to link to Hensley podcast - On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome back Republican attorney general nominee Josh Hawley to the program.

Hawley won the GOP primary for attorney general over state Sen. Kurt Schaefer by a landslide. He will square off against Democratic attorney general nominee Teresa Hensley, who is slated to record an episode of Politically Speaking next week.

For roughly a decade, the Democratic gubernatorial nominee was a firm opponent of campaign donation limits. When he voted to get rid of contribution curbs as a Republican state senator in 2006 and a Democratic state senator in 2008, he believed that an unlimited system would give Missourians a better sense of where money came from and where it was going.

But  Chris Koster abandoned his long-standing opposition to donation limits earlier this year and threw his support behind a proposed constitutional amendment that limits contributions to $2,600 for state-based offices. He says that the current system where million-dollar donations are relatively commonplace is completely out of control.

It’s mid-afternoon in a VFW Hall in Overland, and Eric Greitens has a room full of veterans at full attention. Two Medal of Honor recipients, Michael Thornton and Thomas Norris, just introduced Greitens, and he’s about to provide the crowd with details about his newest mission: Becoming governor of Missouri.

On campaign stops like these, the uniform of the former Navy SEAL is often a blazer, an Oxford-cloth shirt with no tie, and jeans. His speech delivery is disciplined, sharp and deliberate: At town halls and debates, Greitens argues that Jefferson City’s political class has faltered and failed.

In a sign of how competitive Missouri’s U.S. Senate contest has become, the two major candidates – Republican incumbent Roy Blunt and Democrat Jason Kander – held dueling roundtables with area military veterans.

Wednesday’s events were intended to underscore how both men are highlighting their armed services credentials, and emphasizing their concern about the problems facing the nation’s military.

Nine years ago, Chris Koster was a state senator, a former Cass County prosecutor and a rising star within the Missouri Republican Party. Many speculated he would eventually run for governor.

And now he is running for governor, but as a Democrat.

Koster switched parties in 2007,  a stunning move that has set the course for his unusual political career.  He remains the highest-profile politician in Missouri, at least in modern times, to have made such a move

  Missourians are slated to vote on a constitutional amendment that would ban sales taxes on services.

Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander certified the measure, known as Amendment 4, last week for the Nov. 8 ballot. The relatively short amendment says:

You could say that the Republican primary election for secretary of state is a choice between a familiar name and a familiar policymaker.

Challiyan / Flickr

A cloud of uncertainty is hanging over a proposed cigarette tax hike after a Missouri appeals court panel changed the wording voters would see on the November ballot. 

Kurt Schaefer
Connor Wist / KBIA

An ad by a Missouri attorney general candidate that's drawing criticism accuses fellow Republican contender Josh Hawley of working for terrorists. 

Missouri’s crowded GOP contest for governor has lost a participant, as state Sen. Bob Dixon is dropping out.

The departure of Dixon, R-Springfield, isn’t entirely unexpected. He was at the bottom of the pack when it came to fundraising. His last campaign finance report showed him with less than $83,000 in the bank.

Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander, a Democrat running for the U.S. Senate, has adopted one of the GOP’s favorite words – “overreach” – as he attacks President Barack Obama’s habit of using executive orders and rule changes to implement his policies.

Kander’s  prime pitch Thursday to the St. Louis Regional Chamber was that the White House was too dependent, in his view, on using executive orders and rule changes to circumvent the Republicans who control Congress.

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