Vladimir Putin | KBIA

Vladimir Putin

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  Though it's receded from the headlines, the war in Ukraine grinds on nearly five years after it began.

Among the hardest hit are the estimated 1.5 million people internally displaced by fighting between Ukrainian troops and Russian-backed forces.

On a special edition of Global Journalist, we get an on the ground look at the lives of Ukrainians struggling to rebuild their lives after fleeing their homes. We also hear from a Ukrainian journalist and an American scholar on the prospects for some of the victims of Europe's forgotten war.

 


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President Trump is home from Helsinki and hearing the reaction to his joint news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin, and backing off some of Monday’s statements.

David Beard, Poynter: “Trump visit ‘exhausting’ British press corps

Brian Stelter, CNN: “Trump ratchets up ‘fake news’ rally cry overseas during UK visit

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Over the past year, authorities in the Russian republic of Chechnya have reportedly arrested dozens of gay men, in some cases imprisoning them for weeks and torturing them with electric shocks.

Combined with a 2013 law banning what President Vladimir Putin's government called "homosexual propaganda," the Chechen crackdown seems to indicate that Russia is becoming increasingly homophobic even as LGBT rights are being strengthened in many other countries.

On this edition of Global Journalist: a look at gay rights in Russia, including an interview with the first openly gay comedian to appear on Russian television.


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Russia is no stranger to conflicts, but under Vladimir Putin its most enduring one may be the war over news and information. Over the past decade the Kremlin has tightened control over television and the Internet.

Outside Russia, it’s also sought to offer its own version of the news in English and other languages. This is often an anti-American narrative about conflicts in Syria, Ukraine and elsewhere in Eastern Europe at odds with news from other agencies.

Online, allies of the Kremlin have reportedly hired hundreds if not thousands of so-called “trolls” to spread disinformation on social media and in the comments section of news sites.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Russia’s information offensive.