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Your Cheat Sheet To The Missouri 2020 General Election

The time has come to cast a ballot — but for whom? KCUR can help you make your decision with this rundown of the major races and links to more information.

To read this in Spanish, go here.

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Mike Parson took over the governor’s office in 2018 in the wake of Eric Greitens’ scandal-plagued resignation. The overwhelmingly Republican Statehouse has passed many of his priorities. But he’s also overseeing an at-times troubled state response to the coronavirus, which he tested positive for in September.

Nicole Galloway’s been the state auditor since 2015, initially appointed after a death and winning a full term in 2018. She spoke with St. Louis Public Radio, and has done a number of audits on things like Medicaid eligibility and Clay County.

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Mike Kehoe knows his way around Missouri politics, having served as a state senator for seven years before Parson appointed him as lieutenant governor. So this is his first time running for statewide office.

Alissia Canady has been a lawyer, a Kansas City councilmember and narrowly missed a runoff in the 2019 mayor’s race. She’s now looking to become the first Black woman to ever hold a statewide office in Missouri.

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The down-ballot statewide races for secretary of state, attorney general and treasurer don’t seem to be getting a lot of attention, even though their jobs are vitally important. Find out more about all three offices and candidates by reading this.

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Historically speaking, Missourians are big fans of term limits, having already imposed them on the state Legislature, the governor and treasurer. Now comes a decision on whether to do that for the rest of the statewide offices. Is it a way to limit outside influence or a solution without a problem?

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Two years ago, people made it clear: They wanted a nonpartisan demographer to draw state House and Senate districts in a fair manner with an eye to competitiveness. Republican state lawmakers didn’t agree with the will of the public, approving a referendum that, if it passes Nov. 3, would repeal “Clean Missouri.”

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All three U.S. representatives are back up for re-election, and none are running uncontested, though they’ll likely have an easy path to stay in D.C.


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The 2021 Missouri legislative session will be a blockbuster: deciding how to implement Medicaid expansion, dealing with a COVID-hampered budget and redrawing political districts. While the Kansas City metro’s Senate races are pretty much noncompetitive, there are a slate of House races you’ll want to know about.

Missouri is making mail-in voting available to everyone for the first time — though your ballot must be notarized. You can still go to the polls on Nov. 3, too. Find more details at the Secretary of State’s website.

Translation by Marcela Renna in partnership with America Amplified. If you have any questions or concerns about the translation, please email Jennifer@americaamplified.org.

Copyright 2021 KCUR 89.3. To see more, visit KCUR 89.3.

Republican Mike Parson (left) and Democrat Nicole Galloway (right).
Candidates' Campaigns & Flickr / Crysta Henthorne
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Republican Mike Parson (left) and Democrat Nicole Galloway (right).
Republican Mike Kehoe (left) and Democrat Alissia Canady
Candidate's website / Facebook / Crysta Henthorne
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Republican Mike Kehoe (left) and Democrat Alissia Canady
The Great Seal of Missouri
/ Wikimedia Commons
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The Great Seal of Missouri
Crysta Henthorne / KCUR 89.3
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Crysta Henthorne / KCUR 89.3
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Adobe Stock Photo /
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Erica Hunzinger brings several years of editing experience to the politics and education team. Before landing in St. Louis, Erica spent five years on The Associated Press' Central Region desk, handling a wide variety of topics with special emphasis on state government and agriculture and food supply. She also has been a sports copy editor at The News & Observer in Raleigh, North Carolina, and an assistant news editor at The News Journal in Delaware. Erica holds a master's degree in humanities from the University of Chicago (poetry) and bachelor's in journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia. If you can't find her, try looking at Busch Stadium — or any other ball diamond in the region.