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Hundreds gather in Kansas City to protest fall of Roe v. Wade: 'I haven't stopped crying all day'

 Hundreds gathered at Mill Creek Park on Friday to vent and rail against the Supreme Court and lawmakers following the court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.
Carlos Moreno
/
KCUR 89.3
Hundreds gathered at Mill Creek Park on Friday to vent and rail against the Supreme Court and lawmakers following the court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.

Hundreds of protesters gathered at Mill Creek Park near the Country Club Plaza Friday evening to rally against the decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 ruling that legalized abortions across the country.

In Missouri, a trigger law that will now make nearly all abortions illegal took effect minutes after the decision was handed down. The law makes it a felony to induce an abortion and has no exception for rape or incest. Its only exceptions are for medical emergencies that threaten the life of the pregnant person.

In Kansas, abortion remains legal for now, thanks to a 2019 Kansas Supreme Court ruling that found the state constitution includes the right to an abortion. But that ruling spurred the Republican-dominated Kansas Legislature to push for a change to the state constitution. Kansas voters will decide on Aug. 2 whether to amend the state constitution with a provision that says it doesn’t promise access to abortion.

At the rally, speakers railed against conservative lawmakers and the U.S. Supreme Court while protesters around them chanted, holding homemade signs and other displays of their frustration and anger.

“I haven’t stopped crying all day,” Nicole Schultz said. "It’s gut wrenching to think that we have to come to this.”

Schultz said she was so angry that she came to a protest for the first time ever.

“What about all these mothers whose lives are in danger,” she said. “We need to take a stand against all of this.”

 Nicole Schultz draw up a sign at Mill Creek Park on Friday evening. She said she was so incensed by the Supreme Court's ruling in Roe v. Wade that she came out for her first protest ever.
Carlos Moreno
/
KCUR 89.3
Nicole Schultz draw up a sign at Mill Creek Park on Friday evening. She said she was so incensed by the Supreme Court's ruling in Roe v. Wade that she came out for her first protest ever.

Leia Anderson, from Shawnee, Kansas, said it was especially important for her to raise awareness because Kansas residents will vote later this summer over whether abortion is protected under the Kansas constitution.

She said losing abortion rights is an example of government overreach, and she worries about future legislation that would further restrict her rights.

“It’s really becoming a space of legislation that’s policing people’s bodies – to such a degree that it’s setting a precedent for things that are going to come down, legislatively, that are going to be really important,” Anderson said.

“I’m really concerned we’re going to see this used as a precedent to overturn same-sex marriage, that we’re going to start seeing this when we’re talking about things like contraception.”

 Cass Herman displays their displeasure with the Supreme Court's decision during a protest in Mill Creek Park on Friday evening. Herman said they are transitioning and won't need the bras anymore.
Carlos Moreno
/
KCUR 89.3
Cass Herman displays their displeasure with the Supreme Court's decision during a protest in Mill Creek Park on Friday evening. Herman said they are transitioning and won't need the bras anymore.

Cass Herman was holding up a bra with the words “my body, my choice." Herman, who is trans, said they didn’t hear about the court’s ruling until later in the day.

“Everybody at work was pissed off. It’s a horrible thing to happen to our rights. You can vote all you want, but unless you’re out here working on getting things fixed, nothing’s going to change for you.”

Christian Dodge stood toward the back of the crowd near his wife and son. He said he was reluctant to speak for the women gathered there.

“I think it was a step back for human freedom. I never thought in my adult life would I see a reversion like this culturally, and it makes me really sad,” Dodge said. “I’m terrified for every woman in this country."

 District 24 Representative Emily Weber told the crowd to "Sign up. Volunteer. Donate" to help democratic candidates in upcoming elections.
Carlos Moreno
/
KCUR 89.3
District 24 Representative Emily Weber told the crowd to "Sign up. Volunteer. Donate" to help democratic candidates in upcoming elections.

Missouri state Rep. Emily Weber from Kansas City implored the crowd to go out and support Democratic candidates in upcoming elections.

“Sign up. Volunteer. Donate,” she said. ”At the end of the day every single person here needs to go help because this is what happens.”

Stacy Lake is a Democratic candidate for Jackson County executive. She said people aren’t as far apart as they think when it comes to abortion. Lake said being for pro-abortion-rights doesn’t mean you’re pro-abortion.

“What a lot of people here don’t realize is people are not arguing on whether or not abortion is right or wrong, it’s having the right to choose and that must be protected.”

 Leia Anderson attended Friday's rally at Mill Creek Park. She said it was especially important for her to raise awareness because Kansas residents will vote later this summer over whether abortion is protected under the Kansas Constitution. 
Frank Morris
/
KCUR 89.3
Leia Anderson attended Friday's rally at Mill Creek Park. She said it was especially important for her to raise awareness because Kansas residents will vote later this summer over whether abortion is protected under the Kansas Constitution.

Amelia Mendus stood in the middle of the rally, draped in an American flag. She said the ruling won’t eliminate abortion — it will only make it more dangerous, especially for people who can’t afford to travel to a state where the procedure is legal.

“We saw this coming,” she said. “It’s unfortunate and it looks like things will go underground for a time.”

 Amelia Mendus draped herself in a flag to attend Friday's protest at Mill Creek Park to rally against the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.
Carlos Moreno
/
KCUR 89.3
Amelia Mendus draped herself in a flag to attend Friday's protest at Mill Creek Park to rally against the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.

Still, Mendus said she was able to find a glimmer of optimism on an otherwise sad day.

“It’s beautiful to see the cross sectional inter dynamics of the community,” she said, looking at the crowd gathered at the park. “To see all of the love Kansas City has for its citizens. It’s just beautiful.”

Copyright 2022 KCUR 89.3. To see more, visit KCUR 89.3.

Carlos Moreno
Frank Morris has supervised the reporters in KCUR's newsroom since 1999. In addition to his managerial duties, Morris files regularly with National Public Radio. He’s covered everything from tornadoes to tax law for the network, in stories spanning eight states. His work has won dozens of awards, including four national Public Radio News Directors awards (PRNDIs) and several regional Edward R. Murrow awards. In 2012 he was honored to be named "Journalist of the Year" by the Heart of America Press Club.