Gina Kaufmann | KBIA

Gina Kaufmann

Gina’s background combines print and broadcast journalism, live event hosting and production, creative nonfiction writing and involvement in the arts. Early in her career, she followed a cultural beat for The Pitch, where she served as an editor and art writer in the early 2000s.

She also worked as a contributing editor of Heeb magazine out of New York, assisting with the Heeb Storytelling series and ultimately starting her own live storytelling event series in Kansas City. Gina got her public radio chops working first as an intern for KC Currents with Sylvia Maria Gross, then as a co-host of The Walt Bodine Show.

She earned her bachelor’s degree from Columbia University and her Masters of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia.

Segment 1: The rom-com everyone's talking about gets the Screentime treatment.

Always Be My Maybe is the next generation's Asian-American movie. Hear why.

Segment 1: A New York Times reporter sees votes for Quinton Lucas as votes for neighborhoods.

The weekend before Kansas City's mayoral election, a story appeared in the New York Times suggesting that this election came down to a choice: continued emphasis on downtown, or a shift toward prioritizing neighborhoods struggling in downtown's shadow. The author joins us to reflect on the outcome.

Segment 1: Non-drinking bars are filling a void for socializing without booze.

Alcohol is central to a lot of social events and environments. It's part of hospitality. So if you stop drinking altogether, or just want to skip drinks for the evening, where do you go? What do you do? And why do the opportunities seem scarce?

Segment 1: In honor of the Women's World Cup, we ask what's up with the sport here in Kansas City.

We lost our professional women's soccer team in 2017. Kansas City isn't alone; the national league is having a hard time maintaining enough teams to sustain their seasons, despite the sport's popularity among girls.

Segment 1: Telling the American story through art by acclaimed African-American artists. 

There's no hyphen in 30 Americans, an art exhibition featuring masterworks by four decades of African-American artists. That's by design. Hear how Kansas Citians have made this traveling show their own, and why the curator who brought it to the Nelson-Atkins says it's "a long time coming."

Segment 1: Affordability of Micro-Apartments

Developers plan to include micro-apartments as an option for "affordable housing" in the Midland building downtown. The plan has inspired an outcry from skeptical Kansas Citians: Is paying $750 for a tiny apartment truly affordable? A housing advocate and a business journalist weigh in.

Segment 1: Why we don't fix things any more, and why that matters.

There's a national movement encouraging people to learn how to fix things as an antidote to consumer waste and excess spending. But fix-it-yourself workshops happening around the country are having trouble getting off the ground in Kansas City. Our guests give the spiels they'd deliver at such workshops, if they did exist here.

Segment 1: Mini Golf at the Nelson-Atkins

The role of museums in communities are changing, from being places to look at art to spaces where people can gather and socialize. The Nelson-Atkins Museum is also evaluating its role within the community, and as a way to become more of a social space, will be offering mini golf this summer. In this segment, we speak to the musem director about the new mini golf experience and the museum's changing relationship to the Kansas City community. 

Segment 1: Busking Law 101

If you're headed to a major city, you'll likely come across someone performing on a sidewalk with a hat, jar or guitar case set out for tips. But while that experience is common, the regulations governing it are not. We find out what buskers are allowed to do in Kansas City and how that differs from other places across the country.

Segment 1: Bob Wasabi Sushi, poke, and food bowls.  

Reporter Andrea Tudhope gives us a look into one of the first poke bowls to hit menus in Kansas City. Then, a food journalist tells us about the rise of the poke bowl, as well as other popular bowl-based dishes.

Advice For High School Graduates

May 22, 2019

Graduation season is upon us, which means celebration and cliché advice. But a lot of the age-old wisdom doesn't quite ring true in today's changing world. Hear about the helpful and not-so-helpful nuggets doled out to high school seniors. Plus, Kansas Citians share their own tips.

Guests:

Segment 1: Hair and Identity

How you wear your hair is part of your identity. We explore a growing movement to recognize that fact. 

Seg. 1: The North Loop | Seg. 2: Molly Murphy

May 20, 2019

Segment 1: The North Loop

The creation of the North Loop redefined downtown Kansas City in the mid 1900's. How has this region of the highway system impacted our city's past, present and future?

As she was dying, Sonya Willis' mother gave her daughter a warning. 

"She watched me sit back and put my head in my hand and she said, 'Don't you cry.' ... It's like, 'Don't you cry. You get the job done.'"

Portrait Session With Sonya Willis

May 17, 2019

A middle school in Kansas City has been named after Gloria Willis, who grew up in Texas under Jim Crow Law. She joined Kansas City Kansas Public Schools in 1953, and went on to lead the charge to desegregate the schools there.

Her daughter, Dr. Sonya Willis, followed in her mother’s footsteps and became an educator as well. Though they shared similar values, it was not until Sonya became her mother's caretaker that they truly connected. This is their story.

Segment 1: Celeste Ng

Best-selling author Celeste Ng's most recent book is about a lot of things: idealism gone awry, the dark-side of suburbia, and just how complicated family relationships are.

Segment 1: What We Keep

If you were to pick one object in your possession to keep that brings you meaning and joy, what would it be? An author shares intimate stories behind memories of knick-knacks, baubles, and even scraps of paper.

Segment 2, beginning at 34:21: Kansas City Tacos

Segment 1: Reporting on floods

Flooding has been catastrophic outside of Kansas City and covering the damage isn't an easy task. KCUR reporters share perspective on what it's like to wade into these stories.

Segment 1: A preview of Making Movies' latest album

Making Movies, a Kansas City band, has a new album that's catching a lot of attention for reviving a Lou Reed song that never was. We listen to some tunes from it and visit with the band's frontman to hear about his project to teach teenagers the ins and outs of music production.

Segment 2, beginning at 27:40: Taliban Safari

Segment 1: Rhubarb and mint in the Springtime.

For many chefs and farmers, the growing season and subsequent abundance of seasonal ingredients marks the beginning of spring in Kansas City. We hear about different uses for two of those ingredients that go beyond cocktails and pies.

Segment 2, beginning at 12:56 : Campo Lindo and farm-to-table cuisine.

Segment 1: Education & Online Curriculum

A digital education platform introduced to a couple of Kansas school districts has received criticism from some parents. At the forefront of the debate is the question: is education reform tapping into the potential of technology? Or are we disrupting a tried-and-true method of teaching?

Segment 1: Debate KC

Two high schoolers from Kansas City, Kansas, made waves in the 2019 Urban Debate National Championships. We hear more about their experiences and find out how our town has traditionally used debate as a tool for social justice.

Segment 1: Local lawyer finds a niche in space law

Space is an exciting new frontier, challenging humanity to advance in math, science, and engineering. But what about law? We hear from a Kansas City lawyer who has made a name for himself in dealing with the ownership of objects originating from space.

  • Chris McHugh, lawyer

Segment 2, beginning at 15:35: Mark Twain's love letter to American cuisine

Segment 1: Sydney Pursel

A Kansas City-born artist uses all kinds of projects to reconnect with her indigenous roots, and to educate others both in and outside her community. We hear about her art, including a mural she worked on as a part of the new Indigenous Artists Initiative.

  • Sydney Pursel, artist and member of the Iowa tribe of Kansas and Nebraska

Segment 2, beginning at 31:02: Grant Babbitt

Segment 1: Mapping Stigma

A community development specialist and an art curator have witnessed the social stigma surrounding HIV around the nation and world. They unite here in Kansas City with an exhibit that explores these issues and what can be done about them.

Segment 1: Unionization of Graduate Workers

At universities across the country, graduate workers are calling for better wages and benefits. In this conversation, we find out how this movement has permeated through Missouri.

Segment 1: Daycare Deserts

Segment 1: The Sundry Is Closing

Four years ago, an innovative market and restaurant opened in Kansas City with the goal of supporting local, sustainable food. But now it's closing, and we visit with the entrepreneur who started it to find what he's learned about the viability of the local food system.

Segment 2, beginning at 10:25: Making Friends (R)

Segment 1: Hacking Hunger

A group of UMKC students is working to redirect food waste so it can feed hungry Kansas Citians. Their approach has earned them global recognition as entrepreneurs. 

  • Andrea Savage, Enactus member & project member of FeedKC
  • Ben Williams, business professor and faculty advisor

Segment 2, beginning at 19:03: Taxidermy On Film

Segment 1: A fresh look at a traditional drink.

Switchel has been around for a long time as a refreshing reprieve from the labors of farming. We’ll hear more about the drink as well as the secrets to the recipe.

Segment 2, beginning at 10:22: The unexpected finds in a barbecue city.

Pages