death penalty | KBIA

death penalty

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Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says he does not support the gas chamber method to execute prisoners according to KMOX. The issue of lethal injection in death penalty cases has been tied up in courts. Last week, Attorney General Chris Koster suggested Missouri use gas chambers for prisoner executions. He says state statutes allow for either method of execution. 

When Governor Nixon was asked about Koster's suggestion at a press conference Tuesday, he said Missouri does not have a gas chamber and issues related to the death penalty need to be worked out in the courts. 

Attorney General's Office

Attorney General Chris Koster says Missouri may have to resort to using the gas chamber to carry out death sentences. It would be considered as an “unintended consequence” of the state Supreme Court’s refusal to set execution dates.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster wants the state Supreme Court to set execution dates for two inmates before the state's supply of an execution drug expires.

Koster has renewed a request for execution dates to be set for Allen Nicklasson and Joseph Franklin. The state's highest court refused to do so last August, citing a legal challenge to the state's newly planned use of the drug propofol as its execution method.

The attorney general's office said Monday that the Department of Corrections has a limited supply of propofol and much of it will expire next spring.

Nitzan Brumer / FLICKR

Missouri’s plans to use the anesthetic propofol in executions may face new delays.

In May, Missouri announced it was switching to propofol after sodium thiopental, another drug commonly used in executions, became harder to acquire. But, Fresenius Kabi USA, one of propofol’s two domestic suppliers, announced last week it was instructing its distributors not to fill orders from departments of corrections in the United States.

jonathunder / wikimedia commons

The Missouri Supreme Court has declined to set execution dates for six condemned killers, saying doing so is "premature" until the courts decide if Missouri's new execution method passes constitutional muster.

Missouri first state to adopt propofol for executions

May 24, 2012
KBIA file photo

The Missouri Department of Corrections will switch to propofol for all executions.

It’s is best known as the anesthetic that killed pop star Michael Jackson.

j.stephenconn / flickr

A House committee heard testimony Wednesday on legislation that would abolish the death penalty in Missouri.  As St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin tells us, the bill would also commute sentences of all current Death Row inmates to “life without parole."

It may be easier to be sentenced to death in Missouri than in other states, according to a study released today.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • The state Supreme Court tosses out ethics rules passed by the legislature in 2010
  • Derrick Washington pleads guilty to assault
  • A trial judge throws out a lawsuit concerning the new congressional house districts
  • Attorney General Chris Koster writes to the SCOTUS concerning the federal health care mandate

KBIA file photo

Democrat State Senator Joe Keaveny introduced Senate Bill 786 Monday, which would require state auditors to compare the cost of the death penalty with other sentences.

Newscast for January 30, 2012

Jan 30, 2012

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Legislation making Missouri a "right-to-work" state returns to the state Capitol.
  • A proposed bill would abolish the death penalty in Missouri, but its detractors greatly outnumber its supporters.
  • Republican hopefuls for Claire McCaskill's U.S. Senate seat will debate in a Branson high school auditorium tonight.

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