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fake news

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Local newspapers have been eviscerated over the last 15 years as social media and the internet have destroyed their business model. Yet all is not doom and gloom.

In the third part of our series on the global crisis in local news with the Index on Censorship, a look at new business models to support local journalism as well as how robot reporters might yet save their human counterparts.

We'll also get a look at efforts to keep "deep fake" videos from going viral on the internet and further distorting our public conversation.


Mitch Legan / KBIA

Bird Scooters has been making news in Columbia for months. Now, its making headlines around the world for its claim of a copyright violation by a tech news website. Was it a fair claim?

The staff of the Denver Post has an unlikely advocate: the city’s mayor. He says the city needs the Post and its staff of dogged reporters, and is helping in its fight against its hedge fund owners.

Chuck Plunkett, Rolling Stone: “Op-Ed: I stood up for ‘The Denver Post’ and was forced to resign

President Trump used his first State of the Union speech to call for unity, but once again associated illegal immigration with drugs and murder.  Congressional Republicans cheered him.  Democrats largely sat on their hands and grumbled during parts of his immigration remarks.  What did the news media have to say before and after the address?

Kremlin.ru

There has been broad fallout from Russian efforts to hack the 2016 U.S. election, including sanctions, worsening relations between the two countries and a continued cloud over Donald Trump’s presidency.

But in Europe such attacks are hardly new. The first “political” cyberattack thought to have been carried out by Russia in Europe was in 2007 in Estonia.

Since then, other Russia-linked targets have included Ukraine’s election commission, the German parliament, and the campaign of French President Emmanuel Macron.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Russia’s hacking strategy and European efforts to head off the Kremlin’s use of technology to influence foreign elections.


Three very different stories illustrate the common -- and deepening -- fault line that news, sports, entertainment media and higher education are trying desperately to straddle.   Every word, every video clip, every invited speaker, every programming decision is viewed through the hyper-partisan lens of pro-Trump and anti-Trump activists.  On this week's episode of Views of the News we discuss Sean Spicer, Chelsea Manning and ESPN's Jemele Hill.  Plus a look at the new Ken Burns documentary on the Vietnam War.  

Inviting Spicer to the Emmys

The New York Times reports on the dramatic decline in enrollment at Mizzou in the wake of student protests.  A current student leader cries foul while right-wing media gleefully share the story.  Is there enough context?

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal?

How do journalists ring in the New Year?  Megyn Kelly announced she was moving from Fox News to NBC.  CNN's Don Lemon rivaled Mariah Carey for most embarrassing moment by getting progressively more drunk on live TV.  A Washington Post reporter chronicled the death threats he received for his aggressive coverage of Donald Trump.  And lots of us talked about how we could cover the president-elect and other big stories with more clarity and purpose in 2017.  Meanwhile, some big brands tackled Islamophobia in new video ads.

Megyn Kelly says goodbye to Fox News