Hillary Clinton

Sarah Kellogg/ KBIA

A month has passed since Donald Trump was elected as the 45th President of the United States. In these past few weeks, many Democrats and even some Republicans are wondering how this happened. Author Thomas Frank visited the University of Missouri a couple of days after the election and offered a few explanations.

Frank believes that there is no one complete reason as to why Trump won the nomination, but he believes that Trump understood how many Americans felt going into the election.

Well.  I did not see this election coming.  I take no comfort in being in good company.  The evidence was in plain sight.  I chose to discount or ignore it, because I was wed to old ways of thinking.  Clearly many of the analytics we use in elections are obsolete or irrelevant or both.  This applies especially to polls, whose problems I have been talking about in this space for some time.

Michaela Tucker
KBIA

“This is crazy.”

The words of 10-year-old Elena Hoffman seemed to echo the sentiment of many of the partygoers at Ragtag Cinema’s election night watch party on November 8.

The party, which was billed as a bi-partisan gathering, drew mostly Clinton-supporters. Attendees could spend their evening waiting for results at either the bar, the large theater that aired CNN coverage or the small theater that aired the PBS telecast.

Tracy Lane, the executive director of Ragtag, estimated that nearly 200 people were in attendance by 8 p.m.

Next week I’ll give you most of my predictions for key elections.  I’ll give you one today: Hillary Clinton will win the presidential election. 

I realize this revelation will send few of you to the fainting couch.  Most observers are predicting this outcome, and with good reason.

I have my reasons as well and I thought I’d look back at how I’ve been tracking the presidential race from this spot on the dial over the last year.

Last October I said: “Candidates who have the best organizations usually prevail.”  Yes, that’s one of the reasons Clinton will win.

While the third and final presidential debate set for Wednesday evening will surely be marked by the candidates’ disagreements, a forum debating their positions on food and farm issues Wednesday morning was notable for showcasing where the nominees agree.

At a Washington, D.C. forum produced by the agricultural policy group Farm Foundation, surrogates for the Trump and Clinton campaigns presented their candidates’ takes on farm and food issues from trade to taxes. Sam Clovis, a campaign co-chair and policy advisor, spoke on the positions of Republican nominee Donald Trump. Former U.S. Department of Agriculture deputy Kathleen Merrigan spoke on behalf of Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Ask Republican Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri about his party's presidential nominee and you'll likely get a polite but weary response.

marcn/FLICKR

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon's communications director is joining presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's campaign as deputy chief of staff.

Talking Politics - Election Clichés

May 10, 2016
Vote Here sign
File Photo / KBIA

There has been no shortage of clichés to describe this presidential campaign.  But clichés are not necessarily wrong; they’re just tiresome.  Here are three of my favorites:

“It ain’t over till the fat lady sings.”  Actually, for the Democrats, it is over.  Clinton will be the nominee.


  JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Texas Sen. Ted Cruz won't ask for a recount of his narrow loss to businessman Donald Trump in Missouri's presidential primary.

Cruz campaign manager Jeff Roe told The Associated Press on Tuesday that the campaign won't request a recount of the March 15 primary.

Trump defeated Cruz by 1,965 votes out of more than 939,000 cast in the Republican primary — a margin of about one-fifth of a percentage point.

Trump will get 37 delegates and Cruz will get 15.

Talking Politics - Reality Show Campaigns and Negative Ads

Apr 19, 2016
Sully Fox / KBIA file photo

I suppose it is possible for the 2016 presidential campaign to get more strange, and I expect it will.  It is the best reality show ever.  Here are some of the juicy parts:

  • Millions of voters Feeling the Bern
  • Trump and Cruz trading insults – about each other’s wives
  • A Clinton campaign that has been declared too big to fail
  • College students getting the vapors because some mean person chalked the word “Trump” on a sidewalk

Even The Donald and Megan have made up.  You can’t make this stuff up.


Gage Skidmore / Flickr

  JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Republican businessman Donald Trump and former Democratic Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have been certified as the winners of Missouri's presidential primaries.

The results of the March 15 primaries were made official Tuesday. But the losing candidates still have seven days to request a recount.

Trump led Texas Sen. Ted Cruz by 1,965 votes out of more than 939,000 cast in the Republican primary.

Clinton led Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders by 1,574 votes out of more than 629,000 cast in the Democratic primary.

Photo courtesy of the Office of Gov. Jay Nixon

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says he's backing fellow Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton's run for president.

Flickr/ Marc Nozell

The House Select Committee on Benghazi requested that Hillary Clinton appear twice, once on the use of her email system, and once on the Benghazi attack in 2012. Clinton's lawyer David E. Kendall rejected stating that Clinton is willing to appear once in a public hearing to discuss both issues. 

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, a Democratic candidate for president, has agreed to testify before a House panel about the deadly attacks on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, and about her email-retention practices.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders got into the presidential race Thursday, becoming Hillary Clinton's first official challenger for the Democratic nomination. His website has a disclaimer: "Paid for by Bernie not the billionaires."

Although he caucuses with the Democrats in the Senate, he's not a registered Democrat — he's actually the longest-serving independent in congressional history. (There's no rule, by the way, barring candidates who are not registered Democrats from running in the Democratic primary.)

Hillary Clinton's new logo has been much maligned. A simple, rightward-pointing "H" with a red arrow through it that looks like it could have been made with Microsoft Paint.

Red, the color of the other team. How could she? some Democrats wondered. It seemed so amateurish, some design experts lamented.

The House Select Committee on Benghazi announced plans to call Hillary Clinton to testify next month, right around the time her campaign was reportedly going to shift into high gear with a mid-May campaign kickoff speech.

At the same time, a new book about the Clinton foundation is generating the kind of headlines and news coverage no presidential candidate wants to see.

@hillary is not @HillaryClinton. Her Twitter bio once noted as much, but that was "mostly just for a bit of cheek," @hillary herself admits.

Hillary Hartley joined Twitter back in 2006. As an early adopter, she was able to grab @hillary as her handle. For comparison, the @HillaryClinton account was created in 2013.

Flickr user Rona Proudfoot

On Sunday Hillary Clinton sent a tweet and posted a YouTube video announcing her candidacy for president. What is Clinton's campaign doing differently this time around? Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

When the former senator, secretary of state and first lady announced for president on Sunday she smiled into the camera and said, "I'm Hillary Clinton."

Those who were hoping for a return of Hillary's family name, "Rodham," as part of her public identity might have felt some disappointment. For many of her admirers, Hillary Rodham Clinton was the embodiment of aspiration for a woman in public life. This was the woman they wanted to elevate to the White House in her own right.

Hillary Clinton, former Secretary of State, used a personal email during her time at the State Department. The New York Times broke the story on March 2. Missouri School of Journalism professors Judd Slivka, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

McKean said he hopes the media doesn't cast this as another political debate, the right versus the left.