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European Pressphoto

At this year’s Academy Awards a film called “Period. End of Sentence” won the Oscar for best short documentary. The movie focused on menstruation taboos in India and highlighted the story of a group of poor women who banded together to manufacture inexpensive menstrual pads. 

The success of the film gave new visibility to what’s often referred to as “period poverty.”

On this edition of Global Journalist: a discussion about period poverty and some of the ways that stigma about the issue affects women from India to Kenya to the United States.


Forbidden Stories

Covering the environment is a surprisingly dangerous beat for journalists around the world. Over the last decade, as many as 29 reporters have been killed for their work on environmental stories.

 On this edition of Global Journalist, the story of an Indian journalist burned to death for reporting on illegal mining and a Guatemalan journalist forced into hiding for covering pollution protests.  Plus: how a group of international investigators are trying to follow environmental stories too dangerous for the local press to report. 


Travis McMillen

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how the news gets reported in some very different parts of the world.

We’ll talk to a journalist from Ghana about how politicians are undermining the credibility of the news media in the West African democracy.

In addition, as tensions between India and Pakistan are again spiking, we'll meet a Muslim journalist who describes the challenges of working in a country where Hindu nationalist sentiment continues to rise.

Finally, we'll speak to a journalist for a Hong Kong-based news organization about the challenges of reporting from Beijing.


AP Photo

Local and regional newspapers have dwindled all across the U.S. as print advertising revenues have shrunk.

But the U.S. isn't alone - there is a local news crisis all around the globe. In the second part of our series on the decline in local news with our partners at the Index on Censorship, a look at the problem in India, Poland and Argentina.

In these countries, traditional local news outlets face a host of problems: from populist governments to WhatsApp groups.


European Pressphoto Agency

At this year’s Academy Awards a film called “Period. End of Sentence” won the Oscar for best short documentary. The movie focused on the subject of menstruation taboos in India and the story of a group of poor women who banded together to manufacture inexpensive menstrual pads.

The success of the film gave new visibility to what’s often referred to as “period poverty.”

On this edition of Global Journalist: a discussion about period poverty and some of the ways that stigma about the issue affects women from India to Kenya to the United States.


European Pressphoto Agency

The the practice of outdoor defecation is a major cause of diarrheal diseases that kill about 2,200 children a day - more than die from HIV/AIDS, malaria or tuberculosis combined

As of 2015, an estimated 900 million people relieved themselves outside, according to the UN. More than half of them – around a half billion people – were in India.

In response, the Indian government launched what Bloomberg News called “the largest toilet-building campaign in human history.” According to government figures, this “Clean India” campaign has built more than 90 million new latrines and toilets in the past four years.

Still, despite the toilet boom, public health experts say there’s much to do to end the practice of open defecation - and the problem goes far beyond a shortage of latrines.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we’ll examine the issue in India as well as Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s $20 billion campaign to end the problem by 2019.


AP Photo

For many, witch trials may seem like a relic of early colonial America.  But in fact witch-hunting is still a feature of rural life today in many parts of the world.

One place where it's prevalent is India. On average, an Indian woman is killed every other day after being accused of witchcraft, according to government statistics. Many are tortured or publicly-humiliated before being burned, stabbed or beaten to death.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the practice of witch-hunts in India, and why the phenomenon isn't merely an outgrowth of superstition. 


Yann Forget/Wikimedia Commons

In the next decade, India may pass China to become the world’s most populous country.

But there’s something odd about India’s population. 

At its last census in 2011, India had 36 million more men than women. As the population grows, the World Bank predicts there will be 51 million more men by 2031.

This is due in part to the widespread practice of sex-selective abortion and the gender-based neglect of young girls leading to higher mortality rates. In some cases, 'infanticide' of newborn girls is still practiced. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss what some activists call a 'gendercide' against women.


via Wikimedia Commons (Ranjith66)

Climate change is already having big effects on southern Asia.

Deadly heat waves like one that killed 3,500 people in India and Pakistan in 2015 are becoming more frequent. The summer monsoon rains are changing, affecting farmers.  Rising sea levels are expected to flood low-lying settlements and higher ocean temperatures harm sea life.

The climate is already spurring other changes. Thailand and the Philippines have closed beaches as warming waters threaten coral. In other parts of the region, people are moving out of places where drought and natural disasters have made farming increasingly risky. Some argue that the changing climate is even fueling militancy. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how climate change is shaping life in one of the world's most vulnerable regions.


AP Photo

For many, witch trials may seem like a relic of early colonial America.  But in fact witch-hunting is still a feature of rural life today in many some of the world.

One place where it's prevalent is India. On average, an Indian woman is killed every other day after being accused of witchcraft, according to government statistics. Many are tortured or publicly-humiliated before being burned, stabbed or beaten to death.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the practice of witch-hunts in India, and why the phenomenon isn't merely an outgrowth of superstition. 

European Press Agency

The imbalance between the supply of organs for transplant and the demand for them can be staggering.

There are about 75,000 people active on the U.S. waiting list for kidneys, livers and other transplantable organs. On average, 20 of them die each day.

And globally, the situation is much worse.

The international shortage of transplantable organs has lead to a booming underground industry known as the "Red Market,” where people illegally buy and sell human body parts to the highest bidder.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how the donor shortage has fueled a lucrative underground market, and how efforts to stifle it are shaping international policy.

James Cridland/Creative Commons via Flickr

Overpopulation has been debated since British economist Thomas Malthus famously warned in 1798 that humans could reproduce far faster than they could increase their food supply.

But since Malthus's time, world population has grown from 800 million to 7.5 billion today. Yet worries about overpopulation are back. In part that's because lots more people are on the way, complicating efforts to deal with problems like climate change and water scarcity.

The UN forecasts that in the near future the world will add about 83 million people annually. By 2100, world population will grow to 11.2 billion.

On this edition of Global Journalist: a look at the growth of human population and the debate about its risks.


Yann Forget/Wikimedia Commons

In the next decade, India may pass China to become the world’s most populous country.

But there’s something odd about India’s population. 

At its last census in 2011, India had 36 million more men than women. As the population grows, the World Bank predicts there will be 51 million more men by 2031.

This is due in part to the widespread practice of sex-selective abortion and the gender-based neglect of young girls leading to higher mortality rates. In some cases, 'infanticide' of newborn girls is still practiced. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss what some activists call a 'gendercide' against women.


Mark Danielson/Creative Commons via Flickr

Recently an international cricket match in the Indian city of Delhi had to be temporarily halted in the middle of the game for an unusual reason. The cause: air pollution levels so high that a top player for India's opponent, Sri Lanka, began vomiting on the field. 

India has had pollution problems for years, but recently it has gotten significantly worse. Smog was so bad in New Delhi last month the government ordered thousands of schools closed and banned trucks from the road for a week. 

But India’s problem goes far beyond New Delhi. According to the World Health Organization, the country has 13 of the world’s 25 most polluted cities. And in 2015, the British medical journal The Lancet reported that 1.1 million Indians died prematurely from diseases caused by air pollution.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we take an in-depth look at India's pollution crisis. 


Crystal Davis/World Resources Institute / Flickr

Overpopulation has been debated since British economist Thomas Malthus famously warned in 1798 that humans could reproduce far faster than they could increase their food supply.

But since Malthus's time, world population has grown from 800 million to 7.5 billion today. Yet worries about overpopulation are back. In part that's because lots more people are on the way, complicating efforts to deal with problems like climate change and water scarcity.

The UN forecasts that in the near future the world will add about 83 million people annually. By 2100, world population will grow to 11.2 billion.

On this edition of Global Journalist: a look at the growth of human population and the debate about its risks.


AP Photo

 Just two years ago, once-isolated Myanmar seemed firmly on a new course.

Longtime opposition leader and Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy won a sweeping victory in elections that year, a milestone in moving the southeast Asian nation towards democracy and away from decades of military rule.

Now both Myanmar's progress and Suu Kyi's reputation look starkly different as the nation's security forces carry out a massive offensive against the nation's Rohingya Muslim minority in its southwestern Rakhine state. More than a half million Rohingya refugees have fled to neighboring Bangladesh in a matter of weeks after what one top U.N. official has called a "textbook example of ethnic cleansing."

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Myanmar's long history of discrimination against the Rohingya and Suu Kyi's role in the current crisis.


AP Photo

Sherpa guides and porters do much of the work of getting foreign hikers up Mt. Everest. But despite doing an incredibly dangerous job in a lucrative industry, they receive just a small fraction of the money $300 million annually generated by Everest expeditions.

On this edition, filmmaker Jennifer Peedom talks to Global Journalist about 'Sherpa,' her documentary about tensions on Mt. Everest.


AP Photo

About 5,000 women are killed each year in so-called "honor" killings around the world.

These are crimes in which the victims, who are almost always female, are killed by family members - usually men - for bringing what they see as dishonor on the family.

Pakistan and India have the highest rates of "honor" killings in the world. But a new law in Pakistan has made such killings illegal - and raised hopes that the government will address gender violence more effectively.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the history of these killings and some recent high-profile cases that have renewed efforts to end the practice.  


Travis McMillen / RJI

At first glance, media in Pakistan and the Ukraine have little in common.

But in both the South Asian nation and the former Soviet republic, independent private news outlets are relatively new and face a host of challenges both from government restrictions and outside actors. They're also among the most dangerous countries in the world for journalists.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, we interview journalists from prominent media outlets in each country who are visiting the U.S. on fellowships from the University of Missouri-based Alfred Friendly Press Partners.


AP

The Paris agreement on reducing greenhouse gas emissions has led to new hope that the worst effects of climate change may be avoided.

On this edition of Global Journalist, our guests analyze the climate agreement and discuss the prospects for keeping Earth's temperature from rising by 2 degrees Celsius, the point at which dramatic changes to the Earth are inescapable.


Bikas Das / AP

Journalists and bloggers in Bangladesh are finding themselves increasingly under fire. Last year, a group that calls itself “Defenders of Islam” published a “hit list” of more than 80 writers.

Then in the first six months of 2015, three of those named were hacked to death in separate knife attacks. The latest was in May, when four masked men attacked blogger Ananta Bijoy Das with machetes while he was heading to work.

india-vote
Altaf Qadri / AP Photo

India — the world's biggest democracy — just concluded the largest general election in history. Over 537 million votes were cast over the past month, and voters decided to elect a new government. The opposition Bharatiya Janata Party, led by Narendra Modi, won the most votes overall, capturing 31 percent of the vote. The Indian Congress Party, led by Rahul Gandhi, came in a distant second, garnering just over 19 percent of the vote. Based on the results, the BJP picked up a total of 282 seats in the lower house of Parliament, the Lok Sahba.

Rafiq Maqbool / Associated Press

The sexual assault of a young woman on a New Delhi bus last December sparked widespread debate about the safety of women in India. The attack killed a 23-year-old aspiring physical therapist, and led to  nationwide protests.

Anupam Nath / AP Images

India’s northeast state of Assam is suffering through its worst communal violence in more than a decade.

More than 160 million women were never born as a result of sex-selective abortion. That's more than the entire female population of the United States.