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medical marijuana

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ST. LOUIS — Missouri supporters of medical marijuana will have their say in the November election. The only question: Do they cast a yes vote once, twice or three times?

Thanks to successful petition drives for three competing proposals, all three are on the ballot. Two would amend the Missouri Constitution; the other would simply change state law.

What happens if more than one passes? That's where things get sticky.

Minimum Wage, Medical Pot Among Missouri Ballot Proposals

May 7, 2018

Several groups have submitted signatures for proposed ballot measures on a minimum wage hike, limits on lobbyist gifts to lawmakers and medical marijuana in time for the Sunday deadline to get initiative petitions on the Nov. 6 ballot.

The Secretary of State's Office still needs to check the number of signatures for each proposal, and then local election authorities must verify signatures. The process takes weeks to determine whether measures received enough voter signatures to get on the ballot.

Here's a round-up of the proposed ballot measures:

MINIMUM WAGE

Missourians Testify in Support of Medical Marijuana

Feb 7, 2018

Twelve people testified on behalf of a bill Tuesday morning that would allow terminally ill patients to use medical marijuana.

Under current Missouri law, anyone with a terminal illness may use non-traditional medicines, products or devices after exploring all FDA approved treatment options. This is due to the state’s Right to Try law, which passed in 2014.

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A judge says a proposal to allow medical marijuana in Missouri won't go to voters this year.

 

Cole County Circuit Judge Daniel Green ruled Wednesday that the initiative petitions lacked enough valid signatures to qualify for the Nov. 8 ballot.

 

Secretary of State Jason Kander previously said the measure fell about 2,200 signatures short after local election authorities threw out thousands of signatures. Issues included registered voters who signed petitions for the wrong county.

marijuana
LancerenoK / Flickr

A judge says a proposal to allow medical marijuana in Missouri won't go to voters this year.

Cole County Circuit Judge Daniel Green ruled Wednesday that the initiative petitions lacked enough valid signatures to qualify for the Nov. 8 ballot.

Secretary of State Jason Kander previously said the measure fell about 2,200 signatures short after local election authorities threw out thousands of signatures. Issues included registered voters who signed petitions for the wrong county.

OpenFile Vancouver / Flickr

Missouri lawmakers took steps this year to address the growing number of drug overdoses, but health care advocates say more work remains.

Marijuana
lancerok / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - A proposal to legalize medical marijuana has again failed in the Missouri House.

Lawmakers voted down the measure today, 85-71. The legislation would have allowed doctors to recommend marijuana for patients suffering from debilitating illnesses, such as AIDS or epilepsy.

The proposal also would have created a licensing regime for commercial marijuana growers and retailers.

House lawmakers killed a similar measure in April after scaling it back to only cover hospice patients.

KBIA/file photo

Proponents of initiatives aimed at sales taxes, cigarette taxes and medical marijuana submitted petitions Sunday in hopes of getting their proposals on Missouri's November ballot.

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LancerenoK / Flickr

The Missouri House has rejected a proposal to legalize medical marijuana.

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lancerok / Flickr

Legislation that would legalize medical marijuana cultivation with tight restrictions on who could use the drug has won initial approval in the Missouri House.

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LancerenoK / Flickr

Medical marijuana advocates want voters to consider the issue in November.

Flickr

A candidate for Missouri lieutenant governor says he's launching a campaign to legalize medical marijuana in the state.

The Kansas City Star reports Brad Bradshaw, a Democrat, said Tuesday that he's submitted a medical marijuana initiative petition to the state Secretary of State's office for review. If the petition is approved and garners enough signatures, Missouri voters would decide next year whether the state constitution should be amended to allow the sale of marijuana for medical reasons.