Missouri Honor Medals | KBIA

Missouri Honor Medals

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On this special edition of Global Journalist, an extended interview with award-winning foreign correspondent and author Peter Hessler.

In 1996, the U.S. Peace Corps sent the Columbia, Mo. native to a city in central China to teach English at a teacher's college. During that period, few Westerners had spent much time in the city, and Hessler's experiences became fodder for his widely acclaimed 2001 memoir, "River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze."

Hessler later returned to China and spent seven years as a correspondent for the New Yorker, becoming one of the most well-known foreign journalists in the country. Hessler went on to publish three other books, win a MacArthur "genius" grant, and eventually moved his family to Egypt to continue reporting for the New Yorker.


On this week's show, a look at the life of a pioneering female journalist. Fortuna Calvo-Roth was born in 1934 to a Jewish family in Paris, but was raised in Lima, Peru. There she fell in love with the news business during World War II - and came to admire American newspapers like the New York Times and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

So she left Peru and came to the Missouri School of Journalism in the 1950s, where she managed to graduate with honors at just age 19. Despite facing discrimination, she went on to a distinguished career as a correspondent for a number of major Latin American newspapers and later as news executive for the Brazilian publishing group Vision Inc.

Yet journalism was just one chapter of her career - she went on to enjoy success as a theatrical producer, a publisher and as the co-founder of an audiobook label.


On this special edition of Global Journalist, we take a step back from international news to hear from Leonard Pitts Jr., a Pulitzer-winning syndicated columnist for the Miami Herald.

Pitts is well-known liberal critiques of the Trump administration as well as his columns covering race, gay rights, religion and other cultural issues. His column on Sept. 12, 2001 called “We’ll Go Forward From This Moment,” is particularly well-known for directly addressing the perpetrators of the Sept. 11 attacks. In addition to the Pulitzer, Pitts has won numerous journalism awards from groups like the National Association of Black Journalists and the Society for Professional Journalists - and most recently a 2017 honor medal from the Missouri School of Journalism.


On this special edition of Global Journalist, host Jason McLure speaks with two distinguished journalists about their road to success.

MaryAnne Golon, the director of photography of the Washington Post, describes the chaotic days covering the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks and her career working for Time magazine and the Post.

In addition, writer Margaret Engel talks about becoming a playwright, television producer and author after a career in newspaper journalism. Both women are 2017 winners of the Missouri Honor Medal for their service to journalism.


Rich Clarkson

Rich Clarkson is one of the founding fathers of modern sports photojournalism. Born in 1932, Clarkson's early photos of Wilt Chamberlain playing basketball at the University of Kansas in the 1950s were published in a new magazine called Sports Illustrated.

That launched a career that included photographing 60 NCAA men's basketball championships, nine Olympics and many, many other sports events.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, Clarkson talks about how photojournalism has changed over the decades and the stories behind some of the most memorable sports photos of our time.

At the time it seemed certain to fail.

When two Washington Post reporters left the legendary paper to launch a start-up political website and free newspaper with publisher Robert Allbritton in 2007, many in the nation's capital were dismissive.

Nearly a decade later, the tables are turned and the news site Politico is firmly entrenched not just in Washington but as a national news outlet. 

On this special edition of Global Journalist, CBS News' White House correspondent Bill Plante examines the changes to the news business and the biggest stories of his 52-year career.

 Plante, a 2015 recipient of the Missouri Honor Medal and numerous other journalism awards, has covered every presidential campaign since 1968.