pbs | KBIA

pbs

Jim Lehrer laughs at a luncheon table.
Joel Chan/Missourian

Jim Lehrer, pioneering PBS NewsHour anchor and proud Missouri School of Journalism alum, died Thursday at 85. He never lost his sense of humor, decency or the news.

On his last visit to campus, for his October induction into the MU Hall of Fame, he sat down in the studios of the Reynolds Journalism Institute to talk about his storied career, about the future of journalism for Global Journalist.

A full transcript of the conversation with Kathy Kiely, Lee Hills Chair in Free Press Studies, follows: 

Miller Center of Public Affairs/Wikimedia Commons

Missouri School of Journalism alumnus Jim Lehrer talks about his career covering a presidential assassination, two presidential impeachments and 12 presidential debates in an interview at the Reynolds Journalism Institute.

In this program, produced and anchored by Benjamin Brink, Lehrer also recalls his days as a cub reporter with the Columbia Missourian and discusses the challenges now facing journalism and democracy. 


Three very different stories illustrate the common -- and deepening -- fault line that news, sports, entertainment media and higher education are trying desperately to straddle.   Every word, every video clip, every invited speaker, every programming decision is viewed through the hyper-partisan lens of pro-Trump and anti-Trump activists.  On this week's episode of Views of the News we discuss Sean Spicer, Chelsea Manning and ESPN's Jemele Hill.  Plus a look at the new Ken Burns documentary on the Vietnam War.  

Inviting Spicer to the Emmys

Big Bird, the towering yellow bird with confetti feathers from Sesame Street, will eternally be 6 years old, but his character is nearly 50. The man behind Big Bird, Caroll Spinney, is 81 — and has no plans to step out of the suit any time soon.

"I see no reason to quit," Spinney tells NPR's Scott Simon. "I can't imagine walking away from being Big Bird. I mean, that's an awfully good job, and there's not too many of them. So, I just want to keep doing it until I can't do it anymore."