Somalia

AP Photo

The United Nations says that the world is facing the worst food crisis since World War II. Two of the hardest hit countries are in East Africa. In South Sudan, the UN has made its first formal famine declaration in six years.

Meanwhile drought and conflict in nearby Somalia are leading to comparisons with that country's 2011 famine, where 250,000 people died. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the challenges to heading off mass starvation in two of the world's poorest countries.


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Until recently, Ethiopia has been hailed as an African success story. After a decade of strong economic growth, the country has begun to shed its image as a famine-struck wasteland.

But repression by Ethiopia’s authoritarian government has sparked demonstrations that have led to the deaths of hundreds of protesters this year.

The movement gained worldwide attention at the Rio Olympics when the country’s silver medal-winning marathon runner Feyisa Lilesa crossed his wrists above his head at the finish line in a symbol of the protest movement.

(EPA)

Picture a city of about 300,000 people - something the size of Tampa, Fla. or Riverside, Calif.

Now picture all of those people in this city being told it’s being closed down and they have to move.

That’s what the Kenyan government in East Africa is trying to do with the 340,000 people who live in Dadaab, the world’s largest refugee camp. Built 24 years ago by the U.N. to house people fleeing Somalia's civil war, many of the people living there today have never set foot in Somalia and don't want to go back. 


AP

 

For much of its population, Somalia is a difficult and dangerous place to live.

It’s particularly true for reporters. Practicing journalism in a failed state means facing threats from any number of militia groups.

That includes Islamist radicals from al-Shabaab as well as from armed groups loyal to Somalia’s internationally-backed government in Mogadishu. At least 59 Somali journalists have been killed since 1992-the year after the fall of dictator Siad Barre threw the country into chaos.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the state of journalism in Somalia.


Magali Girardin / EPA

Eritrea is sometimes described as "the North Korea of Africa." And it's a deserved title.

Courtesy photo

You see them on the battlefields patrolling the front lines and risking their lives.

But they are not soldiers, at least not in the traditional sense. They’re war correspondents. These brave men and women travel to the most dangerous parts of the globe, all for the story.

For many journalists, covering one war is enough. But there’s a small group of reporters and photographers who have made it their career to jump from one war to another.