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tobacco

Health Department Hires Tobacco Enforcement Officer

Dec 6, 2019
Anti-tobacco sticker at MU
Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

With a new tobacco enforcement officer on the streets, those who sell tobacco and vaping products to minors are now under tighter scrutiny.

The Columbia/Boone County Public Health & Human Services Department hired its first tobacco enforcement and education officer, Public Health Promotion Supervisor Michelle Shikles confirmed Thursday.

Julie Sears, who was hired this week, will conduct compliance checks in Columbia, ensuring that local businesses are not selling tobacco or vaping products to anyone under the age of 21, in line with city ordinances.

Flickr/Creative Commons

Juul and other e-cigarette makers are facing new limits on the sale of their products in the U.S. But internationally, vaping companies are looking to grow.

How governments regulate e-cigarettes varies wildly. In some countries, doctors recommend them as a useful method to quit smoking. In Thailand and other nations, they're banned as a public health menace.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the global climate for e-cigarettes.


Schnuck Markets Inc., one of the Midwest’s largest grocery store chains, will stop selling cigarettes, chewing tobacco and other tobacco products as of Jan. 1.

Suburban St. Louis-based Schnucks announced the move Thursday. Schnucks is the largest grocer in the St. Louis area and operates 115 stores overall in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin and Iowa. The privately held company already does not sell e-cigarettes or vaping products.

Sudipto Sarkar / flickr

Kansas City Council members are expected to approve an ordinance prohibiting stores from selling tobacco products or e-cigarettes to anyone under 21.

File photo / KBIA

 

Attorney General Chris Koster says a new court ruling should allow Missouri to avoid most of a $70 million penalty for its lackluster enforcement of a legal settlement with tobacco companies.

St. Louis Circuit Judge Jimmie Edwards ruled Friday that an arbitration panel wrongly calculated the amount of settlement payments Missouri should lose for failing to diligently enforce the settlement terms in 2003.

A previous decision by arbitration panel had reduced Missouri's $130 million payment this year by about $70 million.

KBIA/file photo

The Missouri House and Senate have each passed bills that would prevent people younger than 18 from purchasing electronic cigarettes.

Sudipto Sarkar / flickr

A Missouri Senate panel has endorsed legislation that seeks to recoup money from a settlement with tobacco companies.

Under the settlement, Missouri expected to get $130 million this year. But it will likely get less than half because of an arbitrator's ruling that state officials failed to diligently enforce the settlement a decade ago.

Sudipto Sarkar / flickr

Missouri had expected to receive about $130 million this April under an annual settlement payment from tobacco companies.

Katie Hiler / KBIA

Some of Missouri’s strongest anti-tobacco advocates just happen to be under 18 years old. More than one hundred students from across the state arrived in Jefferson City Thursday for an anti-tobacco advocacy and education event at the capitol organized by the Tobacco Free Missouri Youth Advocacy Board. The students delivered over two thousand signatures of support along with pinwheels to represent their desire for clean air to House of Representatives Majority Leader John Diehl.

Sudipto Sarkar / flickr

The state of Missouri faces the loss of nearly $70 million this year in tobacco settlement payments due to a unique pricing advantage enjoyed by some cigarette companies.

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Missouri's first female chancellor is Cheryl B. Schrader
  • House passes budget caps
  • Missouri tries to tax cigarettes
  • Medicinal cannabis activists arrested

 

 

Newscast for January 19, 2012

Jan 19, 2012

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Missouri gets 'F' for tobacco control policies, in new report from American Lung Association
  • FDA challenging the use of antibiotics in animals

  • MO chief justice wants to shrink prison

 

Smoking in the LGBT community

Jan 4, 2012
Willem van de Poll / flikr

Missouri has one of the highest smoking rates in the nation -- at 21 percent, it's double the rate in states like Utah and California. But some segments of the population smoke even more. In this week's Health & Wealth update, I talk with MU researchers who have found that the smoking rate among lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Missourians is much higher than in the population at large.