Charlie Clarke | KBIA

Charlie Clarke

In 2003, Pat Roberts got a call from her cousin. She told Roberts, who lived in New York, that she should read a series published by a newspaper in Columbia, Missouri. 

The paper had just printed a decades-old family secret — one that neither of them knew.

"Legacy of a Lynching," which ran in the Columbia Missourian in May of that year, told the story of a black man's murder at the hands of a white mob 80 years before. It went something like this:

On April 20, 1923, a 14-year-old white girl was attacked on the MKT Railroad tracks near MU. The girl identified a black man named James T. Scott as her attacker, and he was charged with attempted rape.

But his case never went to trial. Instead, a white mob broke into his jail cell, dragged him through the streets and hung him from the Stewart Road bridge. No members of the mob were ever convicted of a crime.

Scott was killed on April 29, 1923. 

 

After being approved at the Columbia City Council meeting April 15, certain schools can now have more than six chickens on their property. The amendment was proposed to enhance STEAM programming.

Aside from an annual 10-day project in elementary school classrooms, no public schools in Columbia raise chickens.

But starting this fall, Jefferson and Fairview Elementary School will be the first two to raise them long-term. Fairview is transitioning to become a place-based school, which emphasizes a focus on the school's surrounding environment over places only accessible in textbooks or technology.

KBIA's Charlie Clarke and Columbia Missourian reporter Hannah Hoffmeister went around to some of the district's schools to see how chickens are currently used in schools and how they'll be implemented in the future.

Meiying Wu / KBIA

Columbia School Board election winners Della Streaty-Wilhoit and Blake Willoughby were sworn into their positions on the board Monday night, after a handful of months campaigning and one victorious night celebrating.

Streaty-Wilhoit and Willoughby are replacing retiring members James Whitt and Jan Mees, who stepped down from their positions Monday. Whitt and Mees both acknowledged they experienced a learning curve when first placed on the board and had some advice for the incoming members.


Columbia Board of Education election winners Della Streaty-Wilhoit and Blake Willoughby were sworn into their positions on the board Monday night, after a handful of months campaigning and one victorious night celebrating.

Streaty-Wilhoit and Willoughby are replacing retiring members James Whitt and Jan Mees, who stepped down from their positions Monday. Whitt and Mees both acknowledged they experienced a learning curve when first placed on the board and had some advice for the incoming members.

Three candidates - Blake Willoughby, Jay Atkins and Della Streaty-Wilhoit - are running for two open seats on the Columbia Board of Education on April 2. KBIA spoke with three Columbia Missourian reporters, each of who has been covering a candidate.

Columbia School Board candidates Blake Willoughby and Della Streaty-Wilhoit won the endorsement of the Columbia Missouri National Education Association (CMNEA), which represents teachers in the Columbia Public School District.

CMNEA announced in a news release Wednesday evening that it endorsed the two over the third candidate, Jay Atkins, in a race for two open seats on the board.

Willoughby, 24, is a doctoral student at MU studying theater and performance studies and is working toward a black studies graduate minor and a higher education administration certificate. 

Meiying Wu / KBIA

The Columbia School Board approved a revised version of an attendance area map and a transfer policy Monday night.

The map, known as “option two,” drew concern from a handful of public commenters who said the map had inequity issues. In this version, students eligible for free or reduced lunches rises to 55 percent at Battle High School and lowers to 18 percent at Rock Bridge High School.

Q & A: Columbia Public Schools Making Way Through Redistricting Process

Feb 4, 2019

The Columbia School Board will have its next meeting on Feb. 11, and it plans on focusing heavily on the current redistricting process. KBIA’s Charlie Clarke spoke with Columbia Missourian reporter Hannah Hoffmeister, who has been covering redistricting in Columbia Public Schools since last fall.


Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) has been in limbo since President Donald Trump decided to end of the program in September of 2017. Protests and rallies have taken place across major cities ever since, and federal judges have blocked the move to terminate DACA.

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: 


Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including


As winter weather lingers in mid-Missouri, the group Sustain Mizzou visited Rock Bridge State Park. Jake Krell, the group’s outreach vice president, led a tour of the park to visitors. Krell served as a tour guide over the summer for the non-profit Friends of Rock Bridge. On the tour, Krell took the group through overlooks and into the cave. The group avoided certain areas of the park because of the spreading white-nose syndrome, a deadly disease that affects North American bats that's been problematic in Missouri. Members walked through snow, on water, in the daylight and the darkness of the cave in this audio postcard.

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: