Matthew Long-Middleton | KBIA

Matthew Long-Middleton

Matthew has been involved in media since 2003. While hosting a show on his college radio station, he quickly realized the influence, intimacy and joys of radio. Rising up through the ranks, he became co-station manager of WKCO in 2006.

Matthew soon after graduated cum laude from Kenyon College. After a brief stint as a short-order cook in exotic Gambier, Ohio he joined Murray Street Productions as the marketing manager. At Murray Street he also conducted interviews, produced podcasts, wrote scripts for Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio, and made the office computers hum.

In addition to working at Murray Street, Matthew has done freelance radio production and his work has been featured on Chicago Public Radio’s local news program Eight Forty-Eight. He has also worked as a marketing assistant at WBGO in Newark, NJ, where he helped to grow audience through placing advertisements, managing the station social media, improving the website, building email campaigns and doing in person promotion at jazz events throughout New York and New Jersey.

Matthew now enjoys the thrills of producing KCUR's daily talk show Central Standard. When he's not producing you can typically find him biking, reading, cooking or exploring Kansas City.

Segment 1: How a 1990s movie on DVD saved the life of a queer Kansas teen.

Savannah Rodgers is making a documentary about her obsession, as a 12-year-old, with the movie Chasing Amy.

KCUR is part of StoryCorps' One Small Step initiative to bring together people of differing political opinions for real conversations. This is one we've chosen to highlight.

Joanna Berkebile and Stacey Todd have lived very different lives. Berkebile intentionally set down roots in Kansas City, working as a realtor. She's also active in the city's arts scene and has found a strong sense of community there.

"I'm not super politically active, but I'm active in my community," Berkebile saidto Todd. "[But I'm] not afraid to speak my mind wherever I am. That has ripples and reverberations around me."

It was days after the 2016 election when Joseph Weidknecht, a Trump supporter sporting a sign that read “Proud to Be Deplorable” and a “Make America Great Again” cap showed up at a march protesting the election of Donald Trump in Austin, Texas.

Amina Amdeen, a Muslim student at the University of Texas, was one of the marchers who came to the peaceful rally that day before part of the protest broke into violence.

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Matt and Abby Anderson had only been dating a few months when the accident happened. Abby was just 18 when she lost control of her car on the way to school and slammed into a semi.

"When you woke up and gained consciousness, what was your first concern?" Matt asked her.

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

When Deany and Corbin Goode got a chance to sit down at the StoryCorps Mobile Tour in Kansas City, Corbin got down to business with his questions — and some of them were tough.

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Stephanie Nowotarski is a lot of things at once. She's a postdoctoral scientist working on electron microscopy at the Stowers Institute in Kansas City. She's an artist working in a wide variety of media. 

She also experiences auditory-tactile synesthesia — When she hears some sounds or music, she sometimes also experiences them as touches.

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

John Mendoza graduated from Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas, in 1967, excited to take on a job at NASA as an aerospace engineer. 

"I always wanted to be a figher pilot because of movies and space programs, outer space movies," John told his daughter, Valerie M. Mendoza.

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Joseph and Elaine Chow first met as teenagers in the 1950s. In those days, it was rare for any young adult to have a car. So the fact that Joseph had one immediately stood out.

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Samantha Ruggles came out as a transgender woman long after her grandparents and parents had passed away.

"If they were still alive, how would that conversation have gone? Your coming out?" her friend Darin Challacombe asked.

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Note: This post contains racial slurs and descriptions of violence. 

Rebecca Liberty and Necia Gamby call themselves "sister friends" because their bond is so tight. But the women came from very different environments growing up.

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

"What was it like being the only woman in most of your classes?" Michelle Bertuglia-Haley asked her mother, Lynn Bertuglia.

In the 1970s, it was uncommon for engineering programs in U.S. colleges to accept women. But the University of Kansas did, so Bertuglia decided to give it a shot.

Segment 1: A Kansas City musician's self-proclaimed 'nerdy rap.'

Kadesh Flow is a trombonist with The Phantastics. He released "Room Service," a solo hip-hop album, which he recorded in a hotel room during a gamer convention. Hear more of his story, from leaving his job at Cerner to pursue music to being part of the Nerdy People of Color Collective.

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Chris and Gina Moore have spent almost five years trying to conceive a child.

"I have so much control in our everyday lives, like how we take care of the house or how we take care of our dog," Gina said. "But everything to do with fertility or trying to conceive I had absolutely no control of."

In her new album, "Dirty Computer," Janelle Monáe reveals more of herself than ever before. And, in recent weeks, she has been sharing more of her story, from her background in Kansas City, Kansas, to her sexuality. A look at the music, life and persona of Janelle Monáe ... and what her story means to Kansas Citians.

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

For muralists Phil Shafer, aka Sike Style, and JT Daniels, making bold, colorful murals throughout Kansas City is more than just painting outdoors.

Mariana Hildreth felt like she had done everything right when she decided to come to the United States from Mexico: She had a degree, years of professional experience and worked through legal channels to get a work permit.

She felt privileged.

"'I'm just going to conquer the world, I'm going to move there and I'm going to make it work,'" Hildreth thought before she moved. "But when I came here, nothing that I thought I was mattered."

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Ashley Raines' childhood wasn't easy.

"I wouldn't classify it as entirely ugly or unfortunate or anything, but it was a struggle," Raines told his wife Vanessa Aricco.

Is there a correlation between the way we relate to objects and the way we treat our relationships with people? A KU researcher has found that when we treat everything else as expendable … we may unwittingly treat human beings that way, too.

Guests:

StoryCorps' MobileBooth is in Kansas City until September to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Alex Martinez and Miguel Morales may be more than 20 years apart in age, but their experiences in the United States as Latinx children speak to the unique challenges they have faced here.