Seth Bodine | KBIA

Seth Bodine

Zhihan Huang/Missouri Business Alert

In the visitors room of the Women’s Eastern Reception, Diagnostic & Correctional Center in Vandalia, nine women stand dressed in bright blue caps and gowns. They’re the first to graduate from ASPIRE MO, a program designed to teach inmates the entrepreneurial skills to start a business once they leave prison.

The 20-week program teaches them various skills like market projections, advertising and feasibility studies. By the end of the course, they make a comprehensive business plan.

Ethan Weston/Missourian

What was supposed to be an average day on the farm changed Doug Boswell’s life.

On a cold November day in 2017, Boswell was feeding his cows in Stockton, and he left the gate open. When he returned to feed them, he realized three of the cows had escaped.

He managed to corral two of them back with his tractor, but one was still loose. So, he got on the nearby all-terrain vehicle and chased the cow. But then, his ATV flipped.

He tried to move, but he couldn’t.

“I just couldn’t believe I was paralyzed,” he said.

 

Seth Bodine / KBIA

After the destructive tornado that ran through Jefferson City last week, organizations like the Red Cross have set up resource centers to help those affected. 

Seth Bodine / KBIA

Missouri has one of the oldest trditional arts apprecticeship programs in the United States. And every year, the Missouri Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program sponsors eight master artists and their apprentices - for teaching, sustaining and promoting a tranditional art form - here in Missouri. 

KBIA's Seth Bodine caught up with one of this year's master-apprentice duos to find out about a classical Indian dance being practiced here in the middle of Misouri: Bharatanatyam. 

Seth Bodine/KBIA

Every week in the basement of her home in Columbia, Smrita Dorairajan teaches a dance lesson to her apprentice, Charunetha Murugesan.

 

The dance is called Bharatanatyam. Dating back 3,000 years, it’s one of the oldest classical Indian dance forms. It originated in ancient Hindu temples, where women called Devadasis would practice the dance to dedicate themselves to god. The dance made its way from the temple to the stage, and Dorairajan says many women in India learn the dance today.

 

Seth Bodine / KBIA

In Marthasville, Missouri, the fire department is made up entirely of volunteers. Between its three stations, the department is responsible for covering 168 square miles including surrounding towns like Treloar and Hopewell.

Volunteer fire departments are common in rural communities. In fact, The National Fire Protection Association estimates that 65 percent of the nation’s fire departments are made up of volunteers.

Seth Bodine/KBIA

After months working to comply with state regulators, the only pig museum in the United States is open again for business. As KBIA’s Seth Bodine reports, the museum's owner dedicated herself to agricultural education after some unexpected life events.

Seth Bodine / KBIA

Columbia Board of Education candidate Jay Atkins said if he could imagine a perfect school district, it would be one that had 100 percent literacy at the third-grade level.

For Atkins, who has three children in the Columbia Public Schools and a fourth that will soon enter, literacy is on the top of his campaign agenda. He said he decided to run because he wanted to be more involved and make sure schools are under proper stewardship.


Regional headlines from the KBIA newsroom, including: 

Regional headlines from the KBIA newsroom, including: 

Columbia interim police chief Geoff Jones is seeking to assemble a work group to examine the Vehicle Stop Report Data released by the Missouri Attorney General’s Office. Jones spoke to Columbia City Council Monday night about the effort and about the recent changes he’s made to the police department.

The working group would examine the racial disparities found in the Vehicle Stop Report Data released by the Missouri Attorney General’s Office. The group would examine the data, find gaps and ultimately provide suggestions to Jones for the police department to improve its service.

Don Love, the co-chair of the Empower Missouri Human Rights Task Force, told the council during public comment that the group could help address race disparity in traffic stops found in the 2018 city survey and Vehicle Stop Report. 

Regional headlines from the KBIA newsroom, including: 

Meiying Wu / KBIA

Columbia City Council members showed unanimous support of a house bill that would ban conversion therapy during their meeting on Monday.

The vote was to support Missouri House Bill 516, which would prohibit mental health professionals from practicing conversation therapy with anyone under the age of 18. Boone County State Representative Martha Stevens co-sponsored the bill. Mayor Brian Treece requested the council to prepare the resolution on Feb. 4. 

Meiying Wu / KBIA

Columbia City Council members showed unanimous support of a house bill that would ban conversion therapy during their meeting on Monday.

The vote was to support Missouri House Bill 516, which would prohibit mental health professionals from practicing conversation therapy with anyone under the age of 18. Boone County State Representative Martha Stevens co-sponsored the bill. Mayor Brian Treece requested the council to prepare the resolution on Feb. 4. 

Columbia City Council members showed unanimous support of a house bill that would ban conversion therapy during their meeting on Monday.

The vote was to support Missouri House Bill 516, which would prohibit mental health professionals from practicing conversation therapy with anyone under the age of 18. Boone County State Representative Martha Stevens co-sponsored the bill. Mayor Brian Treece requested the council to prepare the resolution on Feb. 4. 

Courtesy of Art Smith

Talking Horse Production’s newest play might be considered challenging. That’s because it tackles hard subjects: race, implicit bias and prejudice.

 

The play, titled “White People,” is a series of monologues from three ordinary Americans. Talking Horse describes it as a “candid, brutally honest meditation on race and language in our culture.” The play is written by Tony award-winning playwright J.T. Rogers, who is originally from Columbia. His play “Oslo” is currently being performed at the Repertory Theatre in St. Louis.

Meiying Wu / KBIA

The Columbia Board of Education is scheduled to vote on a revised version of an attendance area boundaries map Monday. The latest maps were prompted by a new middle school set to open in 2020 and to avoid future overcrowding.

 

A consulting firm created four map options. The school board asked the firm to further study the “Option 2” map and make adjustments based on community feedback.

The board is also considering a plan to grandfather students currently enrolled to remain at their current schools.

Regional headlines from the KBIA newsroom including: 

Cameron Kirby / Unsplash

Columbia exceeded its renewable energy goals in 2018, and has plans to continue meeting its goals as the requirements increase over the years.

According to a report released by Columbia Water and Light, the city provided 15.65 percent of electric energy from renewable sources in 2018.