Global Journalist | KBIA

Global Journalist

Thursdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Global Journalist is a half-hour weekly discussion of international news by a panel of journalists from around the world. Hosted by Jason McLure, Global Journalist airs at 6:30 P.M. on KBIA.

Check out the video and more at the Global Journalist website.

A crowd carrying a white cross bearing the legend "Colectiv."
Robert Ghement / European Pressphoto Agency

Tol-on-tan! Tol-on-tan!

More satisfying, perhaps, than a Pulitzer Prize was the tribute paid to Catalin Tolontan by a crowd of people chanting his name during a street protest. They were celebrating the Romanian journalist's  role in exposing the oligarchs whose greed killed dozens of people.

It's a scene from one of this year's True/False documentaries about a remarkable act of journalism and civic courage.

In this week's edition of Global Journalist, we meet the movie director and his subject and talk to several Missouri School of Journalism professors about the function and future of investigative journalism.  


Workers in hazmat gear work at a gravesite
Jerome Delay / AP

Two journalists who covered Ebola when victims of an outbreak in Africa came to the United States for treatment six years ago discuss how that experience compares to today's COVID-19 pandemic.

Ebola, which continues to flare in Africa, causes fever and internal bleeding and kills half the people who contract it, according to the World Health Organization.


Makeshift cubicle rooms
Desmond Foo / The Straits Times via EPA

For the second time in two decades, Singapore is grappling with a coronavirus.

One of the hotspots of the SARS outbreak in the early 2000s, the country is putting the lessons it learned then to work as it faces COVID-19, the potentially deadly infection caused by another coronavirus.

Missouri School of Journalism student Aqil Hamzah, quarantined in his hometown, interviewed two veteran newspaper editors about how coverage of the two outbreaks compares. 


Silhouette of a mosquito seen through a microscope
Felipe Dana / AP

At first, it just seemed like an odd story to pursue during a quiet post-Christmas week in the newsroom in 2015. But New York Times reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr.'s interest in what would become the Zika epidemic has made him something of  an expert on viral outbreaks.

After his work on Zika, the virus that ravaged newborns in the tropics, McNeil now finds himself covering the even more deadly coronavirus that is causing COVID-19. In this episode, he gives a reporter's view of the ethics of covering a pandemic while a public health official, the University of Missouri's Lynelle Phillips, offers a different perspective.


Sanitizing gels, wipes, goggles and face masks in passenger car seat.
Carlos Gonzalez / San Francisco Chronicle

Journalists are first responders too.

While many reporters and editors are working from home these days, the women and men who bring you the images of a society in lockdown don't have that luxury.

In a March 20 webinar sponsored by the Reynolds Journalism Institute, three West Coast photojournalists discussed the challenges they are facing and the new precautions they are taking while bringing you the news.

We're airing highlights of that conversation on this edition of Global Journalist.


Long lines of job seekers queuing around booths
Vincent Yu / AP

A new coronavirus emerging out of Asia, striking panic with the suddenness of its onset, the ease of its spread and the virulence of its impact.

Sound familiar?

In 2003, the coronavirus caused SARS, sudden acute respiratory syndrome. This from-the-vault episode of Global Journalist features a conversation with reporters who back then were on the ground at SARS infection hotspots: Beijing, Singapore, Hong Kong and Toronto.

We're re-airing the program now because we think it raises some interesting questions: What stopped the SARS epidemic? And are there lessons we should have learned then that might have spared us some of the pain we're experiencing now? 


Reporters wearing medical masks raise hands to seek recognition at a Beijing press conference.
Wu Hong / European Pressphoto Agency/EFE

During the coronavirus outbreak, Global Journalist is talking to some of the workers on the frontlines. They don't always get the recognition of doctors and nurses, but journalists also are risking — and in some cases — giving their lives to get information to the public.

In this first in a series of podcasts. Missouri School of Journalism students interview a Voice of America reporter how he navigated China's closed society to report on the outbreak.


Terry Anderson waves from a car in a parade
AP Photo/Mark Duncan

While Global Journalist is on hiatus from the KBIA airwaves, a team of student researchers are combing through nearly 20 years of past programs.

This one ran 18 years ago this week.

We thought you might be interested in reflecting on how things have changed since then — and how they have not changed.

In this program, the late Stuart Loory, a veteran correspondent who served as the first Lee Hills Chair in Free Press Studies at the Missouri School of Journalism, interviews a panel of representatives from the Committee to Protect Journalists about international issues of the day and press freedom. Among the guests: Terry Anderson, who was chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press when he was abducted by Hezbollah militants. He spent more than six years in captivity  before his release in 1991. 


World Economic Forum CC 2.0

Two women journalists who launched online start-up publications in their home countries face eerily similar challenges -- not from the business climate but from the political climate.

Global Journalist talks with Supriya Sharma and Maria Ressa about the way the government and business leaders under investigation by their publications are using social media to silence and discredit journalists.


Jim Lehrer laughs at a luncheon table.
Joel Chan/Missourian

Jim Lehrer, pioneering PBS NewsHour anchor and proud Missouri School of Journalism alum, died Thursday at 85. He never lost his sense of humor, decency or the news.

On his last visit to campus, for his October induction into the MU Hall of Fame, he sat down in the studios of the Reynolds Journalism Institute to talk about his storied career, about the future of journalism for Global Journalist.

A full transcript of the conversation with Kathy Kiely, Lee Hills Chair in Free Press Studies, follows: 

Miller Center of Public Affairs/Wikimedia Commons

Missouri School of Journalism alumnus Jim Lehrer talks about his career covering a presidential assassination, two presidential impeachments and 12 presidential debates in an interview at the Reynolds Journalism Institute.

In this program, produced and anchored by Benjamin Brink, Lehrer also recalls his days as a cub reporter with the Columbia Missourian and discusses the challenges now facing journalism and democracy. 


Neil Grabowsky / Montclair Film

Stanley Nelson Jr. came of age as a filmmaker in the 1970s as Hollywood was making 'blacksploitation' films like 'Shaft.'

But as the son of a librarian and a dentist, fictional stories of the ghetto didn't resonate with Nelson - so instead he became a documentary-maker.

More than three decades after his first film appeared on PBS, he looks back on a career that includes documentaries about the Black Panthers, Freedom Riders, Miles Davis, and the murder of civil rights leader Emmet Till.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, the winner of a MacArthur "genius" award and a National Medal in the Humanities sits for an extended interview with guest host Stacey Woelfel.


ICIJ

Marina Walker Guevara has managed two massive global investigations for the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists.

Both the 'Panama Papers' and 'Paradise Papers' investigations of offshore tax havens and money laundering involved a global network of dozens of journalists working in six continents.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, Guevara speaks with host Kathy Kiely about the leaks that revealed how some of the world's most wealthy and powerful people hid money offshore, and how ICIJ meticulously combed through millions of documents to make sense of it all.


After being threatened by the Taliban, filmmaker Hassan Fazili was forced to flee Afghanistan. Like thousands of others, he and his family set out for Europe seeking safety and a stable life.

What follows is a two-year odyssey that Fazili, wife Fatima Hussaini, and their two daughters carefully documented on video with their phones. From negotiating with people smugglers to hiding in abandoned buildings and being beaten by Bulgarian nationalists, the new documentary "Midnight Traveler" highlights the cruelty and capriciousness of the European Union's asylum system – and a family's strength to persevere.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, a look at this remarkable film and an extended interview with producer and writer Emelie Mahdavian.

After debuting at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, the film screened at the 2019 True/False Film Festival and became one of the most widely-lauded documentaries of the year.

 

Note: This program originally aired March 28, 2019

European Pressphoto Agency

Venezuela’s news media has been squeezed by President Nicolás Maduro’s authoritarianism and the country’s ongoing economic crisis.

But Venezuela is not Cuba or North Korea. There are still a number of independent and critical journalists trying to cover news – though their job is far from easy.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we’ll hear more about the struggles of journalists in the country – and what Venezuela’s declining media freedom means for its governance.


AP Photo

Hong Kong’s six-month old protest movement has been one of the biggest international stories of 2019. What began in June as a protest against a bill that would allow for the extradition of criminal suspects to mainland China has turned into a full-blown democracy campaign. 

But it hasn't been an easy story for journalists to cover. Over the past six months journalists have been hit by tear gas, projectiles and pepper spray by the police - and reporters from pro-Beijing news outlets have been attacked by pro-democracy protesters.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Hong Kong's protest movement through the eyes of the journalists on the ground. 


European Pressphoto

Social media influencers have enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. From an industry that was virtually non-existent a decade ago, companies are projected to pay individuals $10 billion globally in 2020 to laud their products in social media posts.

This booming industry has led to a number of different concerns for regulators and for advertisers. The added scrutiny led the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to issue new guidelines for influencers in November.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the rise of the social media influencer industry and how it’s changing advertising.


AP Photo

Japan and South Korea face stark demographic change. Longer life spans and low birth rates in both countries have led to rapidly aging populations. At 126 million, Japan's population is already declining and is forecast to shrink below 100 million in 30 years. South Korea's will begin shrinking in the next decade, but is expected to decline even faster.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the challenges for both countries as they face a future with a shrinking workforce trying to support a rapidly expanding elderly population - and what lessons they hold for the U.S. and other countries. 

Note: This program originally aired May 16, 2019.

National Coalition Against Censorship

From the love poems of Ovid to Michelangelo’s nudes in the Sistine Chapel, art censorship has a long history.

Yet today’s censorship is taking some new forms. As Instagram has become one of the major vehicles for visual art, computer algorithms now play a role in deciding what is acceptable for public consumption. Meanwhile the use of anti-terrorism laws to stifle art expressing political dissent and the rise of populist political movements.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the current growth in censorship and the new ways that artistic freedom is being challenged.


AP Photo

The Catholic Church isn’t alone in facing widespread child sex abuse allegations. Islamic schools internationally are also confronting a history of abuse.

On this week’s show, a look at recent investigations of abuse in Islamic schools in Nigeria and Pakistan – and how families seeking justice for religious leaders who abused their children face many of the same problems as U.S. Catholics.


AP Photo

From Chile to Haiti, massive anti-government protests have spiraled across Latin America in recent weeks.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at what's fueling discontent in Bolivia and Ecuador - and how the local media are being challenged in new ways.


European Pressphoto Agency

Global tourism is a booming industry. But in a growing number of places around the world, the surge in tourism is too much of a good thing.

Venice has been depopulated as year-round residents have fled its historic canals – where they’re now vastly outnumbered by tourists. In the Philippines, the once pristine beaches of the country’s famed Boracay Island were closed for months recently to allow them to recover from the effects of 6 million annual visitors.

In Amsterdam, the crowds are so bad the Dutch tourism board has stopped promoting the city all together – and now encourages people to visit elsewhere.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the spread of this problem – and how tourism sites around the world are trying to adapt.


AP Photo

For more than two months, the Indian government has managed to largely cut off Jammu and Kashmir's 8 million people from the outside world.

Phone and internet links were cut and the local press silenced. The move followed an Aug. 5 decision by India’s Hindu nationalist government to strip the Himalayan region of some of its autonomy.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look inside Kashmir's communications blackout and and the way the current crisis is both escalating tensions with Pakistan and altering the region's politics.  


European Pressphoto Agency

  Picture the most humiliating experience of your life. Now imagine that this awful moment was captured on video by someone else and posted online where anyone could access it just by Googling your name.

This scenario is reality for a growing number of people, and has given rise to the concept of a “Right to Be Forgotten” – the idea that individuals should have some measure of control over personal information or images of them on the internet.

Since 2014, the European Union has given this idea the force of law. Despite controversy over its implementation and concerns it will limit speech, other countries have adopted similar measures - and the debate has even reached the U.S.

  

AP Photo

Forty-four years after Spain pulled its colonial forces out, the people of Western Sahara are still waiting for independence. 

Much of the territory is controlled by Morocco and about half the indigenous Sahrawi languish in refugee camps in neighboring Algeria.

Yet outside the region, there's little news coverage as Morocco has effectively blocked most independent reporting from territory. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the Western Sahara conflict and how it has been shaped by the Moroccan information blockade. 


Travis McMillen/Reynolds Journalism Institute

From the New York Times' reluctance to use the word "lie" or "racist" to describe statements by President Trump to what the news outlet has learned from its coverage of the 2016 election, Executive Editor Dean Baquet speaks candidly about the controversies and achievements of his five-year tenure leading the Times' newsroom.

On a special edition of Global Journalist, Baquet addresses how he hopes to diversify the Times' newsroom, rock-bottom levels of public trust in the media and how the Times' rising subscription sales are enabling new investments in journalism.


Flickr/Creative Commons

Juul and other e-cigarette makers are facing new limits on the sale of their products in the U.S. But internationally, vaping companies are looking to grow.

How governments regulate e-cigarettes varies wildly. In some countries, doctors recommend them as a useful method to quit smoking. In Thailand and other nations, they're banned as a public health menace.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the global climate for e-cigarettes.


AP Photo

South Africa's wealth and stability has drawn millions of migrants from elsewhere in Africa. Yet migration has tested the Rainbow Nation's unity and values.

In recent weeks the country has been the scene of deadly mob attacks against immigrants from other African nations. Earlier this month, twelve people were killed and thousands forced from their homes in a wave of mob violence targeting immigrants.

This kind of violence has happened periodically for more than a decade now - and many of South Africa’s neighbors are angry. After the most recent attacks, Nigeria recalled its ambassador and boycotted an economic meeting in South Africa. Zambia and Madagascar canceled sporting events with South African teams.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at South Africa’s xenophobia problem - and how it relates to rising anti-foreigner sentiment in the U.S. and Europe.


AP Photo

With a mix of new technology and old fashioned snooping, China has built an extraordinary system of mass surveillance to monitor its Uighur minority.

From collecting DNA samples to tracking religious habits and even individual electricity use, China appears to be building a vast security database to control the 13 million Uighurs that live in its western Xinjiang province.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the vast surveillance program that underpins China's "Strike Hard Against Violent Extremism" campaign.  


AP Photo

Once a refuge for foreign journalists fleeing repression at home, the U.S. risks losing that status.

Like other migrants, journalists who come to the U.S. seeking safety are much more likely to wind up in prisons or federal detention centers - sometimes for months - as their immigratiom cases are considered. Their claims are also being heard by immigration courts that are much more likely to deny asylum requests than they were even a few years ago.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the stories of a Cuban journalist and a Mexican journalist who both found themselves locked up in a country they hoped would provide safety. 


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