Global Journalist | KBIA

Global Journalist

Thursdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Global Journalist is a half-hour weekly discussion of international news by a panel of journalists from around the world. Hosted by Jason McLure, Global Journalist airs at 6:30 P.M. on KBIA.

Check out the video and more at the Global Journalist website.

A protest march down a city street led by a group of people carrying a large banner reading "Justicia para Regina Martinez"
Felix Marquez / AP

Once cut-throat competitors, journalists are now more frequently working together — often across borders — to investigate social problems that authorities either can't or won't tackle. 

All too often, these stories involve the murders of reporters. 

Global Journalist talked to founders of several ambitious collaborative journalism efforts about what got them started and how they keep going.


A man gesturing on a stage in front of a blue, black an white screen
Eric Risberg / AP

Last week, the Federal Trade Commission and 48 attorneys general accused Facebook of violating antitrust laws and illegally stifling competition by buying its rivals. It was the latest development in the debate surrounding the power and influence of Big Tech.

Facebook has been wielding its immense power in other ways for years and, wittingly or unwittingly, damaging other institutions along the way. 

Photo of a building entrance with a brass sign reading "Voice of America" next to it
Andrew Harnik / AP

Over the summer, at the insistence of President Trump, the Senate confirmed Michael Pack as the new director of U.S. Agency for Government Media.

Since then, the venerable Voice of America and its sister broadcast outlets have been plunged into chaos.

MU Journalism School students talked to two former VOA directors, a reporter fired by Pack and a lawyer for the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press about the chaos enveloping what has been one of the nation's most effective vectors for "soft power."


Scores of red colored candles burning before kneeling people at an evening memorial service
Robert Ghement / European Pressphoto

Just before the COVID pandemic sent the world into lockdown last spring, visitors to Columbia's  True/False film festival got a sneak preview of a remarkable film about journalism.

Global Journalist: Making media accessible

Nov 18, 2020
Photo of an interpreter for the deaf signing behind a man speaking at a podium during a press conference.
Wilfredo Lee / AP

Modern media offers accessible information to a worldwide audience, but barriers still remain. Thirty years after the Americans with Disabilities Act became law, inconsistent captioning, improper ASL interpretation, and obtuse design hinder many from receiving critical news.

Moreover many who could provide valuable perspectives on what it's like to be "differently abled" are blocked from producing that journalism by newsrooms' failure to build accessibility into the process.

In this episode, journalists look at what it will take to fix the problem — and why it matters. We thank the interpreters who assisted us in our interviews with some of the journalists. Theirs are some of the voices you will hear on this podcast. For a transcript of the program, click here.


A black and white photo of two soldiers reading the Stars and Stripes newspaper in Vietnam in 1
Godfrey / AP

Founded on Nov. 9, 1861 in Bloomfield, Mo. by troops under the command of Civil War Gen. Ulysses Grant, the military newspaper Stars and Stripes has followed U.S. troops into battle for more than a century and a half.

But lately, government budget cutters have been threatening the future of  a news outlet that has been a morale booster and watchdog for soldiers.

Veterans talk about why they think the Defense Department should continue funding a paper that sometimes criticizes it.


Presidential ballot showing the names of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris and Donald Trump and Michael Pence
Ted Warren / AP

Americans aren't the only ones awaiting the results of this year's U.S. presidential election with intense interest.

Missouri School of Journalism students in Professor Beverly Horvit's International Reporting class interviewed journalists from all over the world about who people in their countries like in the 2020 campaign and why.

The reporters know the U.S. well: They've all spent time here as Alfred Friendly or Hubert Humphrey fellows. 

Japanese women marching with "Unity through Equality" banner
Shizuo Kambayashi / Associated Press

Three years ago this month, stories about movie producer Harvey Weinstein's predatory behavior prompted a tidal wave of revelations about sexual harassment in the workplace and the birth of the #MeToo movement.

The newsrooms that reported on the phenomenon were not immune from revelations of gender inequality, and turned inward to examine diversity and inclusion in their own newsrooms.


Reporter recording under a blanket
Courtesy Aqil Hamzah

Students in a Missouri School of Journalism multimedia class taught by Professors Kat Lucchesi and Major King started their spring semester thinking they were going to do a series of podcasts about a faraway pandemic.

Then it hit home, scattering the team across the country — and, in one case, beyond — and depriving them of access to the equipment they'd normally use to create their programs.

While interviewing professional journalists about how they keep their cool in the face of crisis, the reporters and producers of this story got a test of their own resilience. 


A crowd carrying a white cross bearing the legend "Colectiv."
Robert Ghement / European Pressphoto Agency

Tol-on-tan! Tol-on-tan!

More satisfying, perhaps, than a Pulitzer Prize was the tribute paid to Catalin Tolontan by a crowd of people chanting his name during a street protest. They were celebrating the Romanian journalist's  role in exposing the oligarchs whose greed killed dozens of people.

It's a scene from one of this year's True/False documentaries about a remarkable act of journalism and civic courage.

In this week's edition of Global Journalist, we meet the movie director and his subject and talk to several Missouri School of Journalism professors about the function and future of investigative journalism.  


Workers in hazmat gear work at a gravesite
Jerome Delay / AP

Two journalists who covered Ebola when victims of an outbreak in Africa came to the United States for treatment six years ago discuss how that experience compares to today's COVID-19 pandemic.

Ebola, which continues to flare in Africa, causes fever and internal bleeding and kills half the people who contract it, according to the World Health Organization.


Makeshift cubicle rooms
Desmond Foo / The Straits Times via EPA

For the second time in two decades, Singapore is grappling with a coronavirus.

One of the hotspots of the SARS outbreak in the early 2000s, the country is putting the lessons it learned then to work as it faces COVID-19, the potentially deadly infection caused by another coronavirus.

Missouri School of Journalism student Aqil Hamzah, quarantined in his hometown, interviewed two veteran newspaper editors about how coverage of the two outbreaks compares. 


Silhouette of a mosquito seen through a microscope
Felipe Dana / AP

At first, it just seemed like an odd story to pursue during a quiet post-Christmas week in the newsroom in 2015. But New York Times reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr.'s interest in what would become the Zika epidemic has made him something of  an expert on viral outbreaks.

After his work on Zika, the virus that ravaged newborns in the tropics, McNeil now finds himself covering the even more deadly coronavirus that is causing COVID-19. In this episode, he gives a reporter's view of the ethics of covering a pandemic while a public health official, the University of Missouri's Lynelle Phillips, offers a different perspective.


Sanitizing gels, wipes, goggles and face masks in passenger car seat.
Carlos Gonzalez / San Francisco Chronicle

Journalists are first responders too.

While many reporters and editors are working from home these days, the women and men who bring you the images of a society in lockdown don't have that luxury.

In a March 20 webinar sponsored by the Reynolds Journalism Institute, three West Coast photojournalists discussed the challenges they are facing and the new precautions they are taking while bringing you the news.

We're airing highlights of that conversation on this edition of Global Journalist.


Long lines of job seekers queuing around booths
Vincent Yu / AP

A new coronavirus emerging out of Asia, striking panic with the suddenness of its onset, the ease of its spread and the virulence of its impact.

Sound familiar?

In 2003, the coronavirus caused SARS, sudden acute respiratory syndrome. This from-the-vault episode of Global Journalist features a conversation with reporters who back then were on the ground at SARS infection hotspots: Beijing, Singapore, Hong Kong and Toronto.

We're re-airing the program now because we think it raises some interesting questions: What stopped the SARS epidemic? And are there lessons we should have learned then that might have spared us some of the pain we're experiencing now? 


Reporters wearing medical masks raise hands to seek recognition at a Beijing press conference.
Wu Hong / European Pressphoto Agency/EFE

During the coronavirus outbreak, Global Journalist is talking to some of the workers on the frontlines. They don't always get the recognition of doctors and nurses, but journalists also are risking — and in some cases — giving their lives to get information to the public.

In this first in a series of podcasts. Missouri School of Journalism students interview a Voice of America reporter how he navigated China's closed society to report on the outbreak.


Terry Anderson waves from a car in a parade
AP Photo/Mark Duncan

While Global Journalist is on hiatus from the KBIA airwaves, a team of student researchers are combing through nearly 20 years of past programs.

This one ran 18 years ago this week.

We thought you might be interested in reflecting on how things have changed since then — and how they have not changed.

In this program, the late Stuart Loory, a veteran correspondent who served as the first Lee Hills Chair in Free Press Studies at the Missouri School of Journalism, interviews a panel of representatives from the Committee to Protect Journalists about international issues of the day and press freedom. Among the guests: Terry Anderson, who was chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press when he was abducted by Hezbollah militants. He spent more than six years in captivity  before his release in 1991. 


World Economic Forum CC 2.0

Two women journalists who launched online start-up publications in their home countries face eerily similar challenges -- not from the business climate but from the political climate.

Global Journalist talks with Supriya Sharma and Maria Ressa about the way the government and business leaders under investigation by their publications are using social media to silence and discredit journalists.


Jim Lehrer laughs at a luncheon table.
Joel Chan/Missourian

Jim Lehrer, pioneering PBS NewsHour anchor and proud Missouri School of Journalism alum, died Thursday at 85. He never lost his sense of humor, decency or the news.

On his last visit to campus, for his October induction into the MU Hall of Fame, he sat down in the studios of the Reynolds Journalism Institute to talk about his storied career, about the future of journalism for Global Journalist.

A full transcript of the conversation with Kathy Kiely, Lee Hills Chair in Free Press Studies, follows: 

Miller Center of Public Affairs/Wikimedia Commons

Missouri School of Journalism alumnus Jim Lehrer talks about his career covering a presidential assassination, two presidential impeachments and 12 presidential debates in an interview at the Reynolds Journalism Institute.

In this program, produced and anchored by Benjamin Brink, Lehrer also recalls his days as a cub reporter with the Columbia Missourian and discusses the challenges now facing journalism and democracy. 


Neil Grabowsky / Montclair Film

Stanley Nelson Jr. came of age as a filmmaker in the 1970s as Hollywood was making 'blacksploitation' films like 'Shaft.'

But as the son of a librarian and a dentist, fictional stories of the ghetto didn't resonate with Nelson - so instead he became a documentary-maker.

More than three decades after his first film appeared on PBS, he looks back on a career that includes documentaries about the Black Panthers, Freedom Riders, Miles Davis, and the murder of civil rights leader Emmet Till.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, the winner of a MacArthur "genius" award and a National Medal in the Humanities sits for an extended interview with guest host Stacey Woelfel.


ICIJ

Marina Walker Guevara has managed two massive global investigations for the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists.

Both the 'Panama Papers' and 'Paradise Papers' investigations of offshore tax havens and money laundering involved a global network of dozens of journalists working in six continents.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, Guevara speaks with host Kathy Kiely about the leaks that revealed how some of the world's most wealthy and powerful people hid money offshore, and how ICIJ meticulously combed through millions of documents to make sense of it all.


After being threatened by the Taliban, filmmaker Hassan Fazili was forced to flee Afghanistan. Like thousands of others, he and his family set out for Europe seeking safety and a stable life.

What follows is a two-year odyssey that Fazili, wife Fatima Hussaini, and their two daughters carefully documented on video with their phones. From negotiating with people smugglers to hiding in abandoned buildings and being beaten by Bulgarian nationalists, the new documentary "Midnight Traveler" highlights the cruelty and capriciousness of the European Union's asylum system – and a family's strength to persevere.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, a look at this remarkable film and an extended interview with producer and writer Emelie Mahdavian.

After debuting at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, the film screened at the 2019 True/False Film Festival and became one of the most widely-lauded documentaries of the year.

 

Note: This program originally aired March 28, 2019

European Pressphoto Agency

Venezuela’s news media has been squeezed by President Nicolás Maduro’s authoritarianism and the country’s ongoing economic crisis.

But Venezuela is not Cuba or North Korea. There are still a number of independent and critical journalists trying to cover news – though their job is far from easy.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we’ll hear more about the struggles of journalists in the country – and what Venezuela’s declining media freedom means for its governance.


AP Photo

Hong Kong’s six-month old protest movement has been one of the biggest international stories of 2019. What began in June as a protest against a bill that would allow for the extradition of criminal suspects to mainland China has turned into a full-blown democracy campaign. 

But it hasn't been an easy story for journalists to cover. Over the past six months journalists have been hit by tear gas, projectiles and pepper spray by the police - and reporters from pro-Beijing news outlets have been attacked by pro-democracy protesters.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Hong Kong's protest movement through the eyes of the journalists on the ground. 


European Pressphoto

Social media influencers have enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. From an industry that was virtually non-existent a decade ago, companies are projected to pay individuals $10 billion globally in 2020 to laud their products in social media posts.

This booming industry has led to a number of different concerns for regulators and for advertisers. The added scrutiny led the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to issue new guidelines for influencers in November.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the rise of the social media influencer industry and how it’s changing advertising.


AP Photo

Japan and South Korea face stark demographic change. Longer life spans and low birth rates in both countries have led to rapidly aging populations. At 126 million, Japan's population is already declining and is forecast to shrink below 100 million in 30 years. South Korea's will begin shrinking in the next decade, but is expected to decline even faster.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the challenges for both countries as they face a future with a shrinking workforce trying to support a rapidly expanding elderly population - and what lessons they hold for the U.S. and other countries. 

Note: This program originally aired May 16, 2019.

National Coalition Against Censorship

From the love poems of Ovid to Michelangelo’s nudes in the Sistine Chapel, art censorship has a long history.

Yet today’s censorship is taking some new forms. As Instagram has become one of the major vehicles for visual art, computer algorithms now play a role in deciding what is acceptable for public consumption. Meanwhile the use of anti-terrorism laws to stifle art expressing political dissent and the rise of populist political movements.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the current growth in censorship and the new ways that artistic freedom is being challenged.


AP Photo

The Catholic Church isn’t alone in facing widespread child sex abuse allegations. Islamic schools internationally are also confronting a history of abuse.

On this week’s show, a look at recent investigations of abuse in Islamic schools in Nigeria and Pakistan – and how families seeking justice for religious leaders who abused their children face many of the same problems as U.S. Catholics.


AP Photo

From Chile to Haiti, massive anti-government protests have spiraled across Latin America in recent weeks.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at what's fueling discontent in Bolivia and Ecuador - and how the local media are being challenged in new ways.


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