Abdel Fatah al-Sisi | KBIA

Abdel Fatah al-Sisi

European Pressphoto

On the surface, Ghana and Egypt couldn't be more different places when it comes free expression. Ghana ranks higher than the U.S. and U.K. by some measures of press freedom, while Egypt's government is now among the most repressive in the world. 

Yet Ghana's reputation for tolerance and press freedom has been challenged by the recent killing of Ahmed Hussein-Suale, an investigative journalist who worked on a high-profile probe of corruption in professional soccer.

Meanwhile, in Egypt journalists are facing renewed persecution by a government that brands dissenters as terrorists and leads the world in prosecuting reporters and bloggers for "fake news." 

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at challenges to press freedom in Ghana and Egypt. 


Wikimedia Commons/Kremlin.ru

Egypt will hold a presidential election at the end of this month. But there’s little drama about who will actually win.

President Abdel-Fatah el-Sissi, who led a 2013 coup against the country’s first democratically-elected leader, is expected to be handily re-elected.

That’s because el-Sissi’s government has arrested or intimidated all viable potential opponents. The president’s only opponent is virtually unknown – and was actually an outspoken supporter of el-Sissi until just hours before the candidate registration deadline. Yet despite a wave of repression, there are signs of divisions in the security forces that buttress el-Sissi's rule.

On this edition of Global Journalist a look at Egypt’s staged election, and what it may mean for its future and its status as a key U.S. ally in the Middle East.