Artificial Intelligence | KBIA

Artificial Intelligence

"Adversarial artificial intelligence is a field of study which looks at how do you trick these algorithms. One of the things that a lot of people don't understand about this new science of machine learning is that the way these machines learn is we give them lots of examples. We train them." -- SCOTT CHRISTIANSON, MU assistant teaching professor January 31, 2020

Creepy or helpful? That's the question we raise during our discussion about technology's way of storing information about its user with AI enthusiast and University of Missouri assistant professor SCOTT CHRISTIANSON. November 13, 2019

"There are lots of ways that these new breakthroughs in artificial intelligence are being put to good use in medicine - specifically in radiology and in pathology - because they're very good at recognizing patterns," SCOTT CHRISTIANSON on why our conversation today is about advances in AI in the field of medicine. August 22, 2019

AP Photo

Local newspapers have been eviscerated over the last 15 years as social media and the internet have destroyed their business model. Yet all is not doom and gloom.

In the third part of our series on the global crisis in local news with the Index on Censorship, a look at new business models to support local journalism as well as how robot reporters might yet save their human counterparts.

We'll also get a look at efforts to keep "deep fake" videos from going viral on the internet and further distorting our public conversation.


University of Missouri assistant professor SCOTT CHRISTIANSON puts an app designed to assist those with visual impairments to the test using yours truly, our floor director and some wrinkled up dollar bills. May 22, 2019

Never mind tomorrow, machine-learning artificial intelligence is happening now! University of Missouri professor SCOTT CHRISTIANSON tells us just how much it's "creeping into our lives." February 4, 2019

U.S. Dept. of Defense

Advances in technology have transformed modern armies.

But as robotics and artificial intelligence progress, so do the chances that militaries will be able to develop ‘killer robots’ to fight future wars.

In military jargon, these are known as autonomous weapons systems that may not only navigate and find targets without a human ‘pilot’ but also make the decision to use lethal force on their own.

This has spurred a lively ethical debate about whether and when computers may be entrusted with the decision to take a human life.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss the development of ‘killer robots’ and the debate about their use.