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European Pressphoto

Social media influencers have enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. From an industry that was virtually non-existent a decade ago, companies are projected to pay individuals $10 billion globally in 2020 to laud their products in social media posts.

This booming industry has led to a number of different concerns for regulators and for advertisers. The added scrutiny led the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to issue new guidelines for influencers in November.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the rise of the social media influencer industry and how it’s changing advertising.


AP Photo

Japan and South Korea face stark demographic change. Longer life spans and low birth rates in both countries have led to rapidly aging populations. At 126 million, Japan's population is already declining and is forecast to shrink below 100 million in 30 years. South Korea's will begin shrinking in the next decade, but is expected to decline even faster.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the challenges for both countries as they face a future with a shrinking workforce trying to support a rapidly expanding elderly population - and what lessons they hold for the U.S. and other countries. 

Note: This program originally aired May 16, 2019.

National Coalition Against Censorship

From the love poems of Ovid to Michelangelo’s nudes in the Sistine Chapel, art censorship has a long history.

Yet today’s censorship is taking some new forms. As Instagram has become one of the major vehicles for visual art, computer algorithms now play a role in deciding what is acceptable for public consumption. Meanwhile the use of anti-terrorism laws to stifle art expressing political dissent and the rise of populist political movements.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the current growth in censorship and the new ways that artistic freedom is being challenged.


AP Photo

The Catholic Church isn’t alone in facing widespread child sex abuse allegations. Islamic schools internationally are also confronting a history of abuse.

On this week’s show, a look at recent investigations of abuse in Islamic schools in Nigeria and Pakistan – and how families seeking justice for religious leaders who abused their children face many of the same problems as U.S. Catholics.


AP Photo

From Chile to Haiti, massive anti-government protests have spiraled across Latin America in recent weeks.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at what's fueling discontent in Bolivia and Ecuador - and how the local media are being challenged in new ways.


European Pressphoto Agency

Global tourism is a booming industry. But in a growing number of places around the world, the surge in tourism is too much of a good thing.

Venice has been depopulated as year-round residents have fled its historic canals – where they’re now vastly outnumbered by tourists. In the Philippines, the once pristine beaches of the country’s famed Boracay Island were closed for months recently to allow them to recover from the effects of 6 million annual visitors.

In Amsterdam, the crowds are so bad the Dutch tourism board has stopped promoting the city all together – and now encourages people to visit elsewhere.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the spread of this problem – and how tourism sites around the world are trying to adapt.


AP Photo

For more than two months, the Indian government has managed to largely cut off Jammu and Kashmir's 8 million people from the outside world.

Phone and internet links were cut and the local press silenced. The move followed an Aug. 5 decision by India’s Hindu nationalist government to strip the Himalayan region of some of its autonomy.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look inside Kashmir's communications blackout and and the way the current crisis is both escalating tensions with Pakistan and altering the region's politics.  


European Pressphoto Agency

  Picture the most humiliating experience of your life. Now imagine that this awful moment was captured on video by someone else and posted online where anyone could access it just by Googling your name.

This scenario is reality for a growing number of people, and has given rise to the concept of a “Right to Be Forgotten” – the idea that individuals should have some measure of control over personal information or images of them on the internet.

Since 2014, the European Union has given this idea the force of law. Despite controversy over its implementation and concerns it will limit speech, other countries have adopted similar measures - and the debate has even reached the U.S.

  

AP Photo

Forty-four years after Spain pulled its colonial forces out, the people of Western Sahara are still waiting for independence. 

Much of the territory is controlled by Morocco and about half the indigenous Sahrawi languish in refugee camps in neighboring Algeria.

Yet outside the region, there's little news coverage as Morocco has effectively blocked most independent reporting from territory. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the Western Sahara conflict and how it has been shaped by the Moroccan information blockade. 


Travis McMillen/Reynolds Journalism Institute

From the New York Times' reluctance to use the word "lie" or "racist" to describe statements by President Trump to what the news outlet has learned from its coverage of the 2016 election, Executive Editor Dean Baquet speaks candidly about the controversies and achievements of his five-year tenure leading the Times' newsroom.

On a special edition of Global Journalist, Baquet addresses how he hopes to diversify the Times' newsroom, rock-bottom levels of public trust in the media and how the Times' rising subscription sales are enabling new investments in journalism.


Flickr/Creative Commons

Juul and other e-cigarette makers are facing new limits on the sale of their products in the U.S. But internationally, vaping companies are looking to grow.

How governments regulate e-cigarettes varies wildly. In some countries, doctors recommend them as a useful method to quit smoking. In Thailand and other nations, they're banned as a public health menace.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the global climate for e-cigarettes.


AP Photo

With a mix of new technology and old fashioned snooping, China has built an extraordinary system of mass surveillance to monitor its Uighur minority.

From collecting DNA samples to tracking religious habits and even individual electricity use, China appears to be building a vast security database to control the 13 million Uighurs that live in its western Xinjiang province.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the vast surveillance program that underpins China's "Strike Hard Against Violent Extremism" campaign.  


AP Photo

Once a refuge for foreign journalists fleeing repression at home, the U.S. risks losing that status.

Like other migrants, journalists who come to the U.S. seeking safety are much more likely to wind up in prisons or federal detention centers - sometimes for months - as their immigratiom cases are considered. Their claims are also being heard by immigration courts that are much more likely to deny asylum requests than they were even a few years ago.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the stories of a Cuban journalist and a Mexican journalist who both found themselves locked up in a country they hoped would provide safety. 


European Pressphoto

At this year’s Academy Awards a film called “Period. End of Sentence” won the Oscar for best short documentary. The movie focused on menstruation taboos in India and highlighted the story of a group of poor women who banded together to manufacture inexpensive menstrual pads. 

The success of the film gave new visibility to what’s often referred to as “period poverty.”

On this edition of Global Journalist: a discussion about period poverty and some of the ways that stigma about the issue affects women from India to Kenya to the United States.


AP

The global food supply faces a new threat: climate change.

Extreme weather like the massive floods that hit the Midwest during planting season and the severe drought in Somalia this year are becoming more and more frequent.

Even as farmers face new challenges from climate change, they’re also part of the problem. Agriculture generates about a quarter of manmade greenhouse gas emissions.

On this edition of Global Journalist - a look at the relationship between agriculture and climate change, with views from Brazil, Guatemala, Honduras and the U.S.


Forbidden Stories

Covering the environment is a surprisingly dangerous beat for journalists around the world. Over the last decade, as many as 29 reporters have been killed for their work on environmental stories.

 On this edition of Global Journalist, the story of an Indian journalist burned to death for reporting on illegal mining and a Guatemalan journalist forced into hiding for covering pollution protests.  Plus: how a group of international investigators are trying to follow environmental stories too dangerous for the local press to report. 


Travis McMillen

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how the news gets reported in some very different parts of the world.

We’ll talk to a journalist from Ghana about how politicians are undermining the credibility of the news media in the West African democracy.

In addition, as tensions between India and Pakistan are again spiking, we'll meet a Muslim journalist who describes the challenges of working in a country where Hindu nationalist sentiment continues to rise.

Finally, we'll speak to a journalist for a Hong Kong-based news organization about the challenges of reporting from Beijing.


Courtesy

On this special edition of Global Journalist, an extended interview with award-winning foreign correspondent and author Peter Hessler.

In 1996, the U.S. Peace Corps sent the Columbia, Mo. native to a city in central China to teach English at a teacher's college. During that period, few Westerners had spent much time in the city, and Hessler's experiences became fodder for his widely acclaimed 2001 memoir, "River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze."

Hessler later returned to China and spent seven years as a correspondent for the New Yorker, becoming one of the most well-known foreign journalists in the country. Hessler went on to publish three other books, win a MacArthur "genius" grant, and eventually moved his family to Egypt to continue reporting for the New Yorker.


AP Photo

  Everybody with a cell phone is a publisher these days. Maybe it's time we learn to be reporters.

The downside of the internet is that it has given propagandists and peddlers of disinformation easy access to a worldwide audience. No country is immune from the problem.

On this edition of Global Journalist hosted by Kathy Kiely, a look at efforts at efforts to fight disinformation, counter Russian propaganda and learn how some organizations are working to increase news literacy around the world. 

 


Photo: FilmMoment/Jesse van Venrooij

In the first of a two-part series on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, Global Journalist examines the issue in the Netherlands – the first country to legalize euthanasia.

Over the past decade the number of Dutch choosing to have a doctor end their lives voluntarily has climbed to nearly 7,000 per year, or about 4 percent of all deaths in the country. This includes physically-healthy people with dementia and psychological disorders that haven’t responded to treatment.  As the numbers have grown, so too has criticism of the process by which it’s carried out.


AP Photo

The Soviet Union's nuclear program was once one of the largest in the world. But from Chernobyl to the empire's former atomic bomb site in Kazakhstan, the legacy of that effort still affects tens of thousands of people in the former Soviet republics of Kazakhstan, Belarus and Ukraine.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we learn about the Semipalatinsk test site in the Central Asian nation of Kazakhstan, where more than 400 nuclear weapons were tested and where local people now graze their animals near thermonuclear bomb craters.

We also examine the lasting impacts on Ukraine and neighboring Belarus of the 1986 meltdown of Chernobyl's reactor No. 4.


AP Photo

Thousands of children have been used as soldiers in at least 18 countries around the world in the past two years.

For the children who survive, the trauma of war can have long-lasting impacts.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we’re going to hear about how two aid groups are trying to address this issue in South Sudan and Uganda. We'll also hear from two ex-child soldiers about how the trauma of fighting in wars shaped their lives.

This program first aired Nov. 29, 2018.

AP Photo

When Sudan's dictator of 30 years was ousted in April following months of protests, many were hopeful that the African nation might transition towards democracy.

Yet less than three months after Omar al-Bashir's arrest, the country's military turned its guns on the protesters and a general linked to the genocide in Darfur is ascendant.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we look at the political crisis in Sudan and the prospects for a transition to civilian government.


AP Photo

Local newspapers have been eviscerated over the last 15 years as social media and the internet have destroyed their business model. Yet all is not doom and gloom.

In the third part of our series on the global crisis in local news with the Index on Censorship, a look at new business models to support local journalism as well as how robot reporters might yet save their human counterparts.

We'll also get a look at efforts to keep "deep fake" videos from going viral on the internet and further distorting our public conversation.


AP Photo

Local and regional newspapers have dwindled all across the U.S. as print advertising revenues have shrunk.

But the U.S. isn't alone - there is a local news crisis all around the globe. In the second part of our series on the decline in local news with our partners at the Index on Censorship, a look at the problem in India, Poland and Argentina.

In these countries, traditional local news outlets face a host of problems: from populist governments to WhatsApp groups.


AP Photo

All around the world, the local news organizations that report on municipal and regional governments are in decline. 

In the first installment of a special series with the Index on Censorship magazine, a look at news deserts in the U.S., silent zones in Mexico and a poll measuring the confidence of British journalists in their ability to hold the powerful to account. We'll also get a closer view at what the disappearance of local journalists means for democracy and accountability in government.


The success of CNN spawned many 24-hour news networks - many started by governments hoping to shape global public opinion to their advantage.

That group includes China's state-owned English-language CGTN, which broadcasts to 30 million homes in the U.S.

As you might expect from a news channel owned by China’s government - it’s not the place to turn if you want news about top Communist officials enriching themselves or reporting on China’s widespread violations of human rights.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, an extended look at the challenges and opportunities for CGTN as it tries to grow its U.S. audience. Joining the program is Mike Walter, a top news anchor at the channel and host of CGTN's "Full Frame."


Courtesy

Having a child renewed filmmaker Nanfu Wang's interest in China's one-child policy. In effect from 1979 to 2016, the restrictions on family size halted China's explosive population growth but have left the country with a rapidly aging population. 

From forced sterilizations and abortions to fines and propaganda campaigns, Wang examines how the policy was enforced in her new documentary, "One-Child Nation." The film won the grand jury prize at the Sundance Film Festival and recently screened at the True/False Film Festival in Missouri. 

On this special edition of Global Journalist, an in depth discussion between Wang and guest host Joshua Kranzberg about the film and the human legacy of a population control measure unmatched in history.


AP Photo

Japan and South Korea face stark demographic change. Longer life spans and low birth rates in both countries have led to rapidly aging populations.

At 126 million, Japan's population is already declining and is forecast to shrink below 100 million in 30 years.

South Korea's will begin shrinking in the next decade, but is expected to decline even faster.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the challenges for both countries as they face a future with a shrinking workforce trying to support a rapidly expanding elderly population - and what lessons they hold for the U.S. and other countries.


AP Photo

It’s sometimes called “brown envelope” journalism. This is the practice of journalists taking money or gifts from companies, politicians, or even international charities to give them favorable coverage.

Payola has long been a problem in journalism in countries all around the world. Today it’s particularly a problem in developing nations, where journalists are sometimes paid just a few dollars a day with the understanding that they can supplement their income by taking money from those they write about.

But payola isn’t unique to the developing world. It remains an issue for journalists in the U.S. and other wealthy democratic nations - especially those who do business journalism or work that involves reviewing products and services.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how the payola system operates both for journalists in Africa and those in U.S. business news.


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