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Juul and other e-cigarette makers are facing new limits on the sale of their products in the U.S. But internationally, vaping companies are looking to grow.

How governments regulate e-cigarettes varies wildly. In some countries, doctors recommend them as a useful method to quit smoking. In Thailand and other nations, they're banned as a public health menace.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the global climate for e-cigarettes.


AP Photo

There are now nearly twice as many Christians in the Global South as there are in Europe and North America. As Christianity's center of gravity has shifted - so too is the flow of missionaries.

Thousands of Christians from places like Brazil, Nigeria and South Korea - where Christianity was first brought by European and North American missionaries - are now traveling to Europe and North America seeking to convert the natives.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a discussion about the growing phenomenon of "reverse missionaries."


AP Photo

All around the world, the local news organizations that report on municipal and regional governments are in decline. 

In the first installment of a special series with the Index on Censorship magazine, a look at news deserts in the U.S., silent zones in Mexico and a poll measuring the confidence of British journalists in their ability to hold the powerful to account. We'll also get a closer view at what the disappearance of local journalists means for democracy and accountability in government.


There are now nearly twice as many Christians in the Global South as there are in Europe and North America. As Christianity's center of gravity has shifted - so too is the flow of missionaries.

Thousands of Christians from places like Brazil, Nigeria and South Korea - where Christianity was first brought by European and North American missionaries - are now traveling to Europe and North America seeking to convert the natives.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a discussion about the growing phenomenon of "reverse missionaries."


AP Photo

Since France banned women from wearing veils that covered the face in public in 2011, a growing number of European nations have passed similar restrictions.

Belgium, Bulgaria and Austria have passed similar so-called "burqa bans," while Germany, Switzerland, Norway and other countries are considering such legislation.

The laws have sparked a public debate about religious freedom, feminism and xenophobia. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how Europe's courts, legislators and public are grappling with the debate about the meaning of Islamic dress in Western societies.


Emergency Response Centre International (Courtesy)

Back in 2015, the immigration crisis in Europe was in headlines all over the world. Since then the numbers of people crossing the by sea to the continent has declined from more than 1 million annually to just 126,000 through early September of this year, according to the U.N.'s migration agency. 

But many problems remain unresolved. Not least for the tens of thousands of migrants who arrived in Europe over the past few years and still find themselves in legal limbo. On this edition of Global Journalist, we look at Europe's tortured efforts to address the problem, and get an up close view at conditions for migrants in France and Greece. 


AP Photo

President-elect Donald Trump has suggested that he’ll nominate U.S. Supreme Court justices that would overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark case that ended many abortion restrictions in the U.S.

If he succeeds, some states might have laws like that in the Republic of Ireland - which has the most restrictive abortion laws of any industrialized democracy.

Under the Eighth Amendment to Ireland's constitution, abortion is illegal in the heavily Catholic country in all cases except when the life of the woman is at risk. Both the woman or the doctor performing the abortion can face up to 14 years in prison if convicted.

But polls show the constitutional amendment underpinning the ban has lost popular support, raising pressure on Ireland's government to hold a referendum on the issue. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the effort to repeal Ireland's constitutional ban on abortion.


AP

In June, the United Kingdom will vote on whether it will remain part of the European Union.

For those who want out, the so-called “Brexit” would allow the U.K. to better control immigration and free it from onerous EU regulations. But opponents say it would devastate the the U.K. economy, with accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers saying it would cost the the country 142 billion dollars and almost one million jobs in the next four years.  

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the potential benefits and drawbacks of the UK leaving the EU, as well as what happens if the referendum fails.


AP

For months now, the world has watched as more than a million refugees and migrants from countries like Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan have risked their lives to try and find safe haven in Europe.

But this influx has created enormous tensions in the European Union about how many newcomers to accept and which countries should take them. Governments in Sweden and Germany have each taken in hundreds of thousands of refugees and migrants–and taken criticism both from other European states and their own people.

So, who foots the bill for settling the hundreds of thousands of immigrants? And if no one, where will these people go?


European Pressphoto Agency

After the recent attacks in Copenhagen and France involving terrorists targeting Jewish people, Global Journalist looks at whether this is indicative of a broad rise in anti-Semitism in the region.

We examine recent incidents in France, the Netherlands and Denmark and discuss the threat from Islamic extremists and far-right and far-left political groups.

Rex Features via AP Images

In September, voters in Scotland will participate in a unique referendum. They will decide whether or not Scotland should secede from the United Kingdom and become its own, independent country. Supporters of the referendum, led by advocacy group Yes Scotland, say that Scotland should have greater control over what goes on within its borders, like how its tax revenues are spent and how its economic policies are crafted.