Andrea Tudhope | KBIA

Andrea Tudhope

Andrea Tudhope is a freelance reporter for KCUR, and an associate producer for Central StandardShe covers everything from sexual assault and homicide, to domestic violence and race relations. In 2012, Andrea spent a year editing, conducting interviews and analyzing data for the Colorado Springs Gazette series "Other Than Honorable," which exposed widespread mistreatment of wounded combat veterans. The series, written by investigative reporter Dave Philipps, won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 2014. Since graduating from Colorado College in 2013 with a degree in Comparative Literature and Philosophy, her work has appeared in The Huffington Post and The Colorado IndependentShe is currently working on a book based on field research and interviews she conducted in Dublin, Ireland in 2012.

Growing up in Northeast Kansas City, Kansas, LaNya Meade, 14, remembers her mom saying she didn’t want LaNya to get stuck here.

“And so I always thought like, okay, I need to work my hardest and be the best so that I could make it out,” she says.

It’s a familiar refrain for many teens in the area around Quindaro Boulevard. But it’s a refrain many residents, young and old, are hoping to change.

Mattie Rhodes, a nonprofit that provides mental health and other services to Kansas City's immigrant communities, apologized earlier this month for inviting Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents to a community meeting in August.

“After receiving feedback from both staff and the public, we know we made a mistake by asking an ICE spokesperson to be a part of the meeting of community organization leaders. At the very least we should have announced ICE would be there,” the organization said in a statement on Oct. 1.

A journey along Quindaro Boulevard in northeast Kansas City, Kansas, takes us through history, demographic shifts, religion, and plans for economic development. Visit a black-owned bookstore in the 1960s, an integrated church and hear about one of the country's first black police chiefs. Plus, teens grapple with whether they have to leave the area to succeed.

This show is a culmination of months of reporting along Quindaro Boulevard as part of KCUR's Here to Listen initiative

Voters in Wyandotte County will decide on Nov. 5 whether they want to see a change of hands on the Unified Government Board of Commissioners. 

In this election, voters will select commissioners, representatives for the Board of Public Utilities and board members of USD 500 Kansas City, Kansas, public schools. Early voting starts Saturday.

Kansas City officials are concerned by ongoing issues at the city's temporary jail, including six escapes, a death, an assault and now, an attempted suicide — but there seems to be some disagreement over who is at fault.

Mayor Quinton Lucas said he's been "incredibly underwhelmed" by Heartland Center for Behavioral Change, where the city moved municipal inmates in June after ending its contract to house inmates in the Jackson County jail.

A former high-ranking official of the Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kansas, was sentenced Wednesday for misdemeanor battery against a female employee. 

Former General Services Director Tib Laughlin faces 12 months of probation, and must attend anger management classes and continued mental health counseling.

Updated 7:25 p.m. Oct. 7 — One suspect remained at large Monday evening, while another was in custody, in the killing of four people and the wounding of five others in a shooting at a Kansas City, Kansas, bar over the weekend.

Police have identified the four men who were killed at Tequila KC as Martin Rodriguez-Gonzales, 58; Alfredo Calderon, 29; Ebar Meza-Aguirre, 29, and Francisco Anaya-Garcia, 34.

Underwire bras may still be setting off the metal detectors at the Jackson County jail, but the standoff over the issue, nicknamed “bra-gate,” has ended — at least for attorneys.

When Katie Currid and her husband Tyler Jackson returned from four years in Vicenza, Italy, they came with two new babies in tow — one, their son Fox, and the other, though not a real baby per se, the bones of a new business venture.

A Prosecco truck. Like a food truck for bubbles. A way to deliver the bubs any time of day, in true European fashion.

Just over a year after he sued KSHB 41 Action News for race discrimination and retaliation, sports anchor Dee Jackson was let go with no notice.

Jackson said he was out covering a Chiefs practice on Sept. 4 when he got a call to come back to the station, where he was told his contract would not be renewed and that it was his last day. 

"That was a real punch to the gut," he told KCUR.

“The world didn’t deserve her,” La’Kenya Bausby said Friday, of her late sister Daizsa Bausby, who was sexually abused and murdered by her father in 2016.

A Jackson County judge sentenced Jerry Bausby Friday to two consecutive terms of life in prison for second-degree murder and first-degree sodomy. He was concurrently sentenced to 11 years for incest and sexual abuse.

Updated at 9 p.m.

Dozens of college and high school students gathered on the University of Missouri-Kansas City campus on Friday morning to demand action against climate change. On Friday evening, hundreds more reinforced that message at Mill Creek Park near the Country Club Plaza.

The student protest, organized by the local branch of the Sunrise Movement, was one of hundreds of similar events around the world. Many participants were inspired by Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old environmental activist from Sweden who has become a global celebrity in a movement against climate change.

A month after a Missouri judge found Ricky Kidd innocent of a 1996 double murder and released him from prison after 23 years, Kidd's case has officially been dismissed.

Changing Your Mind (R)

Sep 10, 2019

As the 2020 presidential primaries heat up, and issues like gun control and climate change continue to polarize us, we revive a timely-as-ever conversation about the obstacles that prevent us from changing our minds, even when faced with evidence that contradicts our position.

In 1996, Ricky Kidd was imprisoned for a double murder in Kansas City, Missouri, he didn't commit.

Now, after 23 years behind bars, Kidd is free.

He was released Thursday from the Western Missouri Correctional Center in Cameron, Missouri, one day after a DeKalb County judge determined his original trial was unfair, and further, that the evidence was "clear and convincing" Kidd was innocent.

After Ricky Kidd spent decades in prison for a 1996 double murder in Kansas City, Missouri, he says he didn't commit, a DeKalb County judge has found Kidd innocent and ordered that he be freed from prison unless prosecutors pursue a new trial within 30 days.

The ruling comes a few months after Kidd was finally granted a hearing for a civil lawsuit against the state, which claimed that Kidd's custody is illegal because his conviction was illegally obtained.

His lawyers told KCUR in May this was Kidd's last chance at freedom.

Just over a week after her old boss was convicted of battery against her, Maddie Waldeck is suing the Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kansas, where they both worked.

Waldeck, who no longer works for the UG, told KCUR the two years she worked with Dennis "Tib" Laughlin were the "most stressful and heartbreaking of her professional life."

The lawsuit says Laughlin, who was a high-ranking official of the UG, engaged in "a pattern and practice of gender discrimination, harassment and retaliation."

Since Kansas City, Missouri, transferred its inmates from the Jackson County jail to the Heartland Center for Behavioral Change in late June, one inmate has died and two have escaped.

An inmate was found dead Tuesday at the facility at 15th and Campbell, according to police. They have not disclosed the inmate's identity or provided other details. The incident is under police investigation.

Another inmate escaped from the facility overnight Tuesday.

A high-ranking official of the Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kansas, has resigned after a jury on Tuesday found him guilty of misdemeanor battery against a female employee.

Dennis “Tib” Laughlin was director of General Services and worked for the UG for 21 years. According to the UG, he submitted his resignation in writing after the verdict was handed down Tuesday afternoon.

A Wyandotte County jury found a high-ranking official of the Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kansas, guilty of misdemeanor battery against a female employee Tuesday.

Maddie Waldeck, a former Unified Government employee, said on May 1 last year that she was having a "light-hearted" conversation with colleagues after work when her boss, Dennis "Tib" Laughlin, grabbed her by the shirt and pushed her against a wall.

A now-former Kansas City police officer has been charged with involuntary manslaughter in the vehicle crash that killed a Shawnee Mission senior on I-435 near Arrowhead Stadium last fall.

Terrence Watkins was off-duty when he crashed a Police Athletic League van into a car that was caught in slow traffic near Arrowhead Stadium on Oct. 21, 2018, killing 17-year-old Chandan Rajanna and injuring two other passengers.

Monday evening, three years after the killing of Southwest high school senior Daizsa Bausby, a Jackson County jury found her father guilty of her murder. 

In March 2016, Daizsa, 18, was found dead in a South Kansas City motel room. Her body also had multiple scrapes to the forehead, neck, lips and nose, and was "improperly dressed" as though she someone else had put clothes on the body, according to the medical examiner. That medical examiner also performed a sexual assault forensic exam, or "rape kit."

After her underwire bra set off the metal detector at the Jackson County Detention Center one morning, jail employee Charlotte Hardin removed it and sent it through the X-ray machine. Four weeks ago, she was put on leave after being told she wasn’t allowed to place undergarments in the X-ray machine.

The veteran employee of the jail has not been given a return date.

More than 100 people converged on U.S. senators’ offices Tuesday in Overland Park and Kansas City, Missouri, as part of a nationwide demonstration to protest the treatment of immigrants being detained at the U.S.-Mexico border. 

Now that it’s July, Wyandotte High School senior Tahj Harris said he hears gunshots every day.

“I’m used to it,” he said. “I don’t think much about it.”

For many teens in the northeastern corner of Kansas City, Kansas, violence feels normal.

It all started in August 2016.

Natasha Hays, a young mother of three, was killed in her sleep in a drive-by shooting in Northeast Kansas City, Kansas.

Days later, another drive-by took the life of 15-year-old Brannae Browne. Hays’ teenage son, Michael Adams Jr., was charged with first-degree murder, though a jury later found him not guilty.

What followed was a string of killings that left four teenagers dead in less than a year — one that doesn’t seem to be over yet.

After his son was born last February, Marcus Washington and his partner lost custody pretty quickly. The mother struggled with substance abuse. Washington said he tried to help her through it so they could get their son back, but she didn't want to get better. 

"We had to separate. My kid came first," he said. 

Seven months later, Washington won full custody of Marcus Washington Jr. 

"Trans rights are human rights." 

That was the rallying cry as Kansas City's first trans pride march kicked off late Saturday afternoon at Hamburger Mary's on Broadway. 

It was a colorful crowd of more than 100 people, many toting the pink, white and blue transgender flag and signs that read "I'm Here, I'm Queer" and "Black Trans Lives Matter."

"I am impressed and blown away by each and every person who showed up today," said march organizer Faith Matthews.

The Food and Drug Administration this week extended the public comment period on CBD oil by two weeks. The public now has until July 16 to share input as the FDA considers how to to regulate the fast-growing industry.

CBD, or cannabidiol, is an oil extracted from hemp flowers. Unlike marijuana, it contains very little THC — no more than 0.3 percent according to federal regulations — which means ingesting hemp CBD won't get you high.

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