Andrea Tudhope | KBIA

Andrea Tudhope

Andrea Tudhope is a freelance reporter for KCUR, and an associate producer for Central StandardShe covers everything from sexual assault and homicide, to domestic violence and race relations. In 2012, Andrea spent a year editing, conducting interviews and analyzing data for the Colorado Springs Gazette series "Other Than Honorable," which exposed widespread mistreatment of wounded combat veterans. The series, written by investigative reporter Dave Philipps, won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 2014. Since graduating from Colorado College in 2013 with a degree in Comparative Literature and Philosophy, her work has appeared in The Huffington Post and The Colorado IndependentShe is currently working on a book based on field research and interviews she conducted in Dublin, Ireland in 2012.

When Christine Taylor-Butler opened her property tax assessment Friday, she was shocked to see the value of her Hyde Park home had been raised by $250,000, which is up around 70 percent.

"If someone writes me a check for $600,000, I will sell right now," Taylor-Butler laughed.

But, she said, her home, which she describes as a rehab house, is nowhere near worth that kind of money. 

Taylor-Butler isn't the only Jackson County homeowner with sticker shock.

New apartments and townhomes are coming to downtown Kansas City, Kansas, next summer.

The $11 million project from the Prairie Fire Development Group and Community Housing of Wyandotte County will bring about 50 units, ranging in price from $500 a month to $1,100 a month, to Washington Boulevard near the 7th Street Trafficway. 

Robert Baynham has been the pastor at the nearby Metropolitan Baptist Church for 37 years. He said the Boulevard Lofts will be the first new housing development he's seen in downtown or northeast Kansas City, Kansas.

Nearly 100 criminal defense attorneys signed an open letter to Sheriff Darryl Forté and other Jackson County officials Thursday, stating that the new security protocol is "unreasonable and unnecessary" and denies them meaningful access to their clients.

But a new policy announced Thursday is meant to accommodate the women who've complained that underwire bras are setting off the metal detector, and that they can't visit their clients unless they take off the bra or leave and return later with a new bra

This story has been updated and clarified with quotes from Presiding Judge David Byrn from the court transcript.

New security measures at the Jackson County Detention Center are causing some controversy after female attorneys complained they are required to remove their underwire bras in order to enter. 

In a tweet Monday, Jackson County Sheriff Darryl Forté called this "misinformation," saying that "no one was asked to take off underwire bras."

The head of the state public defender's office in Kansas City testified Thursday that public defenders labor under excessive caseloads and are unable to fulfill their ethical obligations to their clients. 

During a nearly 12-hour-long proceeding in Jackson County Circuit Court, Ruth Petsch, who oversees the biggest public defender office in Missouri, occasionally broke down in tears as she discussed the pressures her attorneys face because of what she described as unmanageable caseloads.  

Bob Shin, who you might know as Bob Wasabi, is known around town for serving up some of the freshest fish in Kansas City, Missouri, at his small sushi restaurant on 39th Street.

But, his daughter Tanya Shin says he has another nickname.

Segment 1: Bob Wasabi Sushi, poke, and food bowls.  

Reporter Andrea Tudhope gives us a look into one of the first poke bowls to hit menus in Kansas City. Then, a food journalist tells us about the rise of the poke bowl, as well as other popular bowl-based dishes.

After the Lee's Summit School Board rejected a racial equity training proposal Thursday night, Superintendent Dennis Carpenter interrupted the board meeting and told the board to review his contract and “find a leader you can trust.”

“Every piece that I’ve put forward in this district to try and ensure greater equity, it was met with opposition,” Carpenter said. “If you don’t believe that of all inequities in the district, the greatest one isn’t racial, I don’t know what rock you’re living under … Folks, we’ve got work to do.”

Violent crime is down in Kansas City, Kansas, due in part to a 60-day crime-fighting initiative. 

Federal, state and local law enforcement, including Kansas City, Kansas, Police and the Kansas Highway Patrol, partnered to target drug and "gang" activity in March and April. Through this effort — dubbed "Operation Lateral Storm" — they carried out 219 arrests and cleared nearly 600 warrants, officials said. From nearly 800 traffic stops, they seized 38 weapons, 37 pounds of narcotics and about $17,000.

Lime scooters are out, at least for now, but two new providers will soon deploy their dockless fleets in Kansas City, Missouri.

City officials launched a year-long pilot program Thursday, which will gauge how electric bicycles and scooters fit into Kansas City's public transportation system and regulations. 

After decades in prison for a 1996 double murder in Kansas City, Missouri, he says he didn't commit, Ricky Kidd said he has a new hope.

"For the first time in 23 years, I feel like I had my day in court," he told KCUR over the phone from Crossroads Correctional Facility in Cameron, Missouri.

His renewed hope comes after a recent, long-awaited hearing for a civil lawsuit against the state, which claims that Kidd's custody is illegal because his conviction was illegally obtained.

When Viyolla Matok came out of her C-section at Research Hospital back in January, she heard something no new parent wants to hear. 

"They told me I couldn't take her home," Matok said.

Updated 3:47 p.m. April 26 — Kansas City Chiefs coach Andy Reid said Friday that it's his understanding an investigation into how wide receiver Tyreek Hill's child was injured has been reopened.

But the Johnson County District Attorney's office had no comment and Hill's lawyers said "we cannot confirm that." Reid did not take any questions about his statement. 

Late at night in February 2017, Samuel Gillis Jr. drove his SUV to Hope City, a community center at East 24th and Quincy that feeds the homeless and provides services for drug addicts.

Gillis was drunk, so he doesn’t remember what happened next. But according to Kansas City, Missouri, police, Gillis got out of his SUV and punched a man who worked there three times, breaking his nose badly enough to require two surgeries.

Kansas City Mayor Sly James' term is rapidly coming to an end. 

At his final State of the City address Tuesday night, James reflected on his tenure, but spent most of the 40-minute speech campaigning for a sales tax to pay for universal pre-K.

"If we screw it up, we're the ones liable," James said. "You know what's far more regressive than a 3/8-cent sales tax? Poverty and crime. Winding up in jail and not being able to dig your way out because you don't have the skill set or money. It's time for a change."

Flooding continues along the Missouri River after last week's "bomb cyclone" and ongoing snowmelt, posing a challenge for small towns like Elwood, Kansas. 

Bobby Hall is a city supervisor in Elwood, a small town of around 1,200 people just across the river from St. Joseph, Missouri. With the river at 27 feet Wednesday, and expected to crest at 29 feet Thursday, officials are predicting potentially 5 feet of water for homes and businesses nearby.

At the end of Friday prayer, dozens of worshippers at Masjidu Nuur Islamic Community Center in Kansas City, Missouri, said an extra one. They prayed for Allah to take the victims of the New Zealand shooting to paradise. 

Updated 5:30 p.m. March 16 to correct headline, characterization of investigation  Kansas City wide receiver Tyreek Hill is involved in an investigation into an alleged assault on a juvenile at his home. 

About five years ago, Ruskin Heights in South Kansas City was the third most violent neighborhood in Jackson County.

But a new approach to tackling crime changed that, and it has a little something to do with how COMBAT, the county’s Community Backed Anti-Drug Sales Tax is becoming an anti-crime sales tax.

Wes Parham never imagined he could be an author.

“The idea that I would write a book is not something I ever thought as a kid or a teenager, because I wasn’t exposed to authors,” says Parham, who grew up around 76th and Troost in Kansas City, Missouri, and went to Lincoln Preparatory Academy.

Last year, Parham published his first book. And last weekend, at the Black Authors Network Book Fair & Art Show at the W.E.B. DuBois Learning Center, he shared it with the community.

It's still about a year out, but there's a new grocery store coming to downtown Kansas City, Kansas, and Katherine Carttar, director of economic development for the Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kansas, said it's long overdue.

This story has been updated to include statements from Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley and Rep. Sam Graves.

For the most part, the reactions of Kansas' and Missouri's congressional delegation to President Donald Trump's emergency declaration Friday fell along party lines.

On Tuesday night, 15-year-old An'Janique Wright was shot and killed outside of Central Academy of Excellence during a basketball game. Two women have been charged with her murder.

Though Wright was not a student at Central, her killing hit hard — especially because this week marks one year after 17 teenagers were killed in a mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School  in Parkland, Florida.

Kansas City, Kansas Police Department has turned a 128-year-old church into a community gym for kids.

St. Mary's Church is home to the city's first Police Athletic League. Mayor David Alvey recognized it at the grand opening Thursday night, but the program has been up and running for a few weeks. 

Every weeknight from 5-9 p.m., the doors of the church at 5th and Ann Avenue are open to the public.

Executive Director Matt Tomasic spent 23 years with the police department in Kansas City, Missouri, but he has lived in Kansas City, Kansas, his whole life.

The Jackson County Courthouse will remain closed until February 19.

County Executive Frank White announced the decision Thursday at the Independence, Missouri, branch of the courthouse. Many services and court hearings have been temporarily transferred to Independence after two water lines broke in less than a week at the downtown Kansas City location. 

"This will allow our team to continue to work without interruption. The damage to the courthouse is extensive," White said.

A new $20 million scholarship program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City will help around 800 students over the next decade. 

Bloch Family Scholarships will bring two new scholarships to UMKC, and expand the existing Henry W. Bloch Scholars program, which aims to serve students from urban neighborhoods who may not be considered for scholarships due to past academic performance.

Brian Ramirez is one of those scholars at UMKC. He said he was a good student in high school but always struggled with standardized testing.

A global transportation and supply chain management company is shuttering its Edgerton, Kansas, location, putting 136 people out of work. 

XPO Logistics operates on about 11 acres of the 1,700-acre Logistics Park, a rail intermodal and warehouse district that has been a boon for the Edgerton economy. The district also hosts corporate giants like Amazon, UPS and a terminal of the BNSF railway.

Taylor Hirth said she was in good spirits Thursday after a Jackson County judge sentenced her rapist to 30 years in prison.

William Luth, 26, of Blue Springs, Missouri, pleaded guilty Thursday for breaking into Hirth’s apartment in February 2016 and raping her in front of her then two-year-old daughter.

Hirth reported the incident, had a rape kit done and turned in DNA evidence to Independence police, but she has criticized how the department handled the case.

Luth is serving a 41-year prison sentence for raping a Johnson County sheriff's deputy later that year.

New data from the Washington Post suggests the Kansas City area is missing out on $10 million a week from government contracts as the shutdown stretches on. That’s in addition to the thousands of federal workers not getting paid. Those missed paychecks for contractors and employees alike have placed a heavy burden on both budgets and families.

In a strongly-worded email to the school board, the Lee's Summit teachers union urged the board not to extend Superintendent Dennis Carpenter's contract.

In the email, the Lee's Summit chapter of the National Education Association (LS NEA) said Carpenter shouldn't have pushed for diversity training during a contentious boundary change process.

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