Andrea Y. Henderson | KBIA

Andrea Y. Henderson

Andrea Henderson joined St. Louis Public Radio in March 2019, where she covers race, identity and culture as part of the public radio collaborative Sharing America. Andrea comes to St. Louis Public Radio from NPR, where she reported for the race and culture podcast Code Switch and produced pieces for All Things Considered. Andrea’s passion for storytelling began at a weekly newspaper in her hometown of Houston, Texas, where she covered a wide variety of stories including hurricanes, transportation and Barack Obama’s 2009 Presidential Inauguration. Her art appreciation allowed her to cover arts and culture for the Houston African-American business publication, Empower Magazine. She also covered the arts for Syracuse’s Post-Standard and The Post and Courier in Charleston, South Carolina.

Andrea graduated from the University of Texas at Arlington with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and earned her master’s degree in arts journalism from Syracuse University. For three years, she served on the board of the Houston Alliance of Fashion and Beauty as the media chair, and she is a member of the National Association of Black Journalists. When the proud Houstonian is not chasing a story, she enjoys catching up on her shows, getting lost in museums and swimming in tropical waters.

Follow her journey through St. Louis via Twitter and Instagram at @drebjournalist.

As the 2019-2020 St. Louis Board of Aldermen session commenced on Tuesday, members strolled in with smiles on their faces as they greeted guests and fellow aldermen with hugs and gifts for the newest members.

Family members and guests on the floor and in the chamber gallery cheered as three newly elected and 12 re-elected members, including Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed, were sworn into office. The newest members are Alderwoman Shameem Hubbard, D-26th Ward, Alderman Jesse Todd, D-18th Ward and Alderman Bret Narayan, D-24th Ward. 

The Women’s Group on Race Relations will convene St. Louis faith leaders to discuss how faith can combat racism on Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the Congregation Temple Israel in Creve Coeur.

“There is a saying that Sunday is the most segregated day in St. Louis,” said Evelyn Rice-Peebles, an organizer. “It tends to be very little cross-pollination on Sundays and if we profess to be people of faith, how can we be so unkind based on race.”

Growing up in Pittsburgh, co-founder of the cultural commentary website VerySmartBrothas and the author of the memoir “What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker,” Damon Young is bringing his “living while black” experiences to the Kranzberg Arts Center on Friday.

Young, 40, harbored the idea of writing a book for while. His agent suggested he take his punchy racial, cultural and political explainers and compile them in a more profound but still engaging way.