Noah Taborda | KBIA

Noah Taborda

Noah Taborda is a Sports Broadcasting Journalism major who hopped on the short flight from Chicago to hone his trade at the University of Missouri. He hopes to cover a meaningful moment or two in his future career.


At the corner of St. John and Askew in Kansas City’s Historic Northeast is a nondescript red brick and stone building that almost blends with the surrounding neighborhood. The exterior stands in contrast to  lively Spanish language movies being screened inside. 

Yosmel Serrano opened the movie theater, La Selva De Los Relojes (or the Jungle of Clocks), to help a Latino community embrace its cultural voice and heritage.

"I know English, but I love Spanish, and I don't want to lose my Spanish and I don't want to lose my art," he says. "So the first thing to be proud of yourself and to be able to integrate into another community is to learn more about yourself."

Segment 1: Why former college athletes care that future college athletes might financially benefit from their name and image.

Many think statements by the NCAA are a step forward since student athletes bring in millions for their respective universities, but others say it's not enough of a step.

Segment 1: Why a group of Bolivians in Kansas City demonstrated in the streets.

In response to news that the president of Bolivia had stepped down, a group met outside Union Station in solidarity with friends and family involved in much riskier demonstrations back in Bolivia. Their message was not about one candidate versus another, but the democratic process itself.   

Segment 1: Kansas City voters revert Martin Luther King Boulevard back to its previous name, Paseo.

The morning after  Martin Luther King's name was voted off of a major boulevard, we analyze what the controversy and its outcome mean for Kansas City communities. Plus, how this all looks through a national lens.

Segment 1: The financial stress of college causes some students to struggle.

For college students who don't come from financial means, it can be difficult to survive on a college campus. We hear about how they try to stay afloat while also staying on top of classes.

Segment 1: The woman who coined 'white fragility' unpacks the meaning of the term.

Robin DiAngelo first started noticing what she now calls 'white fragility' about twenty years ago, when she worked alongside people of color as a diversity trainer. The resulting research culminated in a book that's been a New York Times Bestseller for more than a year. It's also elicited death threats.

Segment 1: The host of The Splendid Table stops by on a Kansas City visit.

Francis Lam is the son of immigrants, the father of a toddler, and a rising star in the food world. Hear his take on how something as simple as food ties into complex, multi-layered personal stories, in his life and in our culture.

  • Francis Lam, host, The Splendid Table

Segment 2: Bob Dylan may not be forever young, but a lot of his fans are.

Segment 1: A famous crossword puzzle creator makes Kansas City his home.

David Steinberg has been making crossword puzzles since he was 12, and getting them published in the New York Times since he was 14. He's just moved to Kansas City. In this conversation, he talks about sleeping on Will Shortz's couch, and other career milestones.

Segment 1: A Kansas City avocado toast tutorial.

Avocado toast is very popular. We get explanations, tips and recommendations from a local fan, who also happens to be a nutrition expert.

Segment 2: A search for great neighborhood coffee shops.

Segment 1: An artist makes us look more closely at the disposable still life piling up on the kitchen table.

When Yoonmi Nam looks at the takeout containers, junk mail and plastic bags that accumulate around her, she sees a still life. Translating these objects into ceramics and putting them on a pedestal, she gives weight and permanence to the things that briefly populate our lives before getting tossed aside.

Segment 1: A Kansas City dance performance is a transatlantic collaboration.

Krystle Warren and Brad Cox have been musical collaborators for years, continuing to make music together across an ocean. As Warren prepares to head from Paris to Kansas City for an October performance, the two discuss their shared history and their craft.

Segment 1: A mass shooting on Central Avenue leaves a community grief-stricken.

Our reporter describes the weekend's shocking news from Wyandotte County, and a community leader asks Kansas Citians to understand what happened as an isolated incident that struck a growing, hard-working, tight-knit neighborhood.

Segment 1: New reseach on how climate change coverage varies from country to country.

A KU journalism professor is at the forefront of research into how climate change stories are framed by journalists based on where on the globe they are working. The greatest divide occurs along the lines of relative wealth and economic development.

Seventy large portraits in the courtyard of the National World War I Museum and Memorial put visitors face-to-face with Holocaust survivors.

Country Music

Sep 27, 2019

Ken Burns' Country Music series inspires interviews with Kansas City musicians about what country music means to them.

Segment 1: Generational differences in responding to climate change are complex.

Last week's climate strikes in Kansas City were organized by a young Kansas Citian who left the film industry and moved halfway across the country to take on this fight. His story represents a differing sense of urgency around climate change, but more than that, too. 

Americans spend an average of 90,000 hours at work in a lifetime. So what we do at work isn't separate from life. It is life. At a recent event hosted by Central Standard, people gathered to tell true stories from life on the job. We're sharing a few of those stories with you here.

Segment 1: A new documentary explores the life of abstract expressionist painter Albert Bloch.

Albert Bloch lived the final decades of his life in Lawrence, Kansas. But at the height of his career, he was a member of a band of artists that helped create modernism in Europe.

The University of Missouri is hosting a campuswide open house this Saturday, April 13, offering a behind-the-scenes look at the MU community. This is the first ever Show Me Mizzou Day and will have events that range from academics to athletics.

In total, there are more than 100 activities which will begin at 10 a.m. and wrap up at 2 p.m. These events include “Saturday Morning Science,” a special presentation from Nobel Laureate and MU professor emeritus George Smith, tours of various academic facilities and a peak into the Ellis Library rare books vault.

Noah Taborda

Since breaking into mainstream media, eSports has fought for its space in athletics. Faced with conflicts for a spot in the Olympics and against misconceptions from the public, eSports is finding an audience in a new generation.

Now, universities across the country, including the University of Missouri, are taking the first steps toward potentially bringing eSports closer to legitimacy. KBIA’s Noah Taborda has the story.


Travis McMillen | Janet Saidi / RJI | KBIA

Tuesday is election day and voters across mid-Missouri are deciding on school board, mayoral and city council races. One of the most important races on the Boone County ballot is the Columbia mayoral race, with two experienced politicans vying for the job.

Mayor Brian Treece  is seeking a second term and has served as Columbia's mayor since 2016. Before his election as mayor Treece worked on historic preservation efforts in the city and chaired the Downtown Leadership Council.

Noah Taborda / KBIA

Recruits and their families gathered from around the country on Wednesday as part of the first Mizzou Esports recruitment cycle. The University announced in December the creation of an esports program, which would center around the game Overwatch. Now recruits are getting the chance to meet potential teammates.

Arabella McIntire is a freshman and was the first commit back in December. She said she expects the chemistry the team builds now will help them be more cohesive during competitions.

“I’m just looking forward to getting to know everybody and play together and build a really good program and a really good team, where we play on each other’s good aspects, and we build each other up and we’re better because of each other.”

Columns and Jesse Hall
Adam Procter / Flickr

The University of Missouri will be establishing a National Center for Rural Mental Health, the university announced today. The center will be funded by a $10 million grant from the US Department of Education.

The center will benefit rural schools in Missouri, Virginia and Montana. Staff and researchers hope to help at least 110 rural schools across those states by creating a database of information and provide a training system to support the mental health needs of their students.

Wendy Reinke is a professor in the Department of Psychology and the lead investigator on the grant. She says one important step is applying gathered information and applying it to rural schools.

“These rural schools are unique in so many ways and I think figuring out sort of what we know works now in some of our suburban school districts and how we can map them, onto the challenges faced by rural schools, that have unique circumstances, is an important next step.”

Meiying Wu

The City of Columbia released a city manager search survey Wednesday in an effort to increase community input. In the survey, citizens will have an opportunity to voice their opinion on what qualities they would like to see in their next community leader.

The survey will help focus City Council’s search for former City Manager Mike Matthes’ replacement.

Margrace Buckler is Columbia’s Human Resources Director. She said the survey gives citizens to pinpoint what professional experience the city will look for.

According to the Arbor Day Foundation, Columbia’s urban trees are the best maintained in the country in 2019. Columbia Water & Light was named 2019 Tree Line USA in honor of the City’s exemplary work in proper urban tree care, the city announced today. Tree Line USA recognizes utilities that are exemplary in practices that deliver safe electricity while maintaining urban trees. Trees that aren’t trimmed can result in ‘blinks’ in electric service or power outages, according to Columbia Water & Light.

Morgan Long is the electric services superintendent. He says the honor shows the cities dedication to providing a safe environment.

“It’s a good feeling to know that were making a difference and to recognize a utility that operates on a moderate scale, such as us, can promote good customer service and safe electricity at the same time.”

Some of you might be interested to know that this coming Saturday is the 666th day of the Trump presidency.

How did your party and candidate and ballot issue do last week? I feel the same way: Could have been worse, could have been better.

If you are a Republican you like picking up seats in the U.S. Senate, with Missouri being a big contributor to that. You don’t like losing the U.S. House, especially by more than the average number of seats after a presidential election.

Noah Taborda / KBIA

Voters in Missouri 47th House district have a choice to make - Representative Chuck Basye, a Republican, faces a challenge from Democrat Adrian Plank. While Basye and Plank agreed on what the core issues are, they are on the opposite side of the spectrum when it comes to solutions.

Both candidates sat down with KBIA’s Noah Taborda to discuss the issues on their minds, particularly “Right To Work” policies and their impact on Missourians in the 47th district.

In Missouri’s 44th District State House seat, encompassing parts of Boone and Randolph counties, Republican Representative Cheri Toalson Reisch faces a challenge from Democrat Maren Jones. The candidates are self-proclaimed polar opposites in policy and priorities.

As part of KBIA’s series of Candidate Conversations, KBIA’s Noah Taborda sat down with the candidates. Representative Reisch told KBIA she identifies as a conservative Christian who as a State Representative believes it’s important to represent all constituents, whatever their political affiliations.

Those of us with October birthdays always get two gifts. One is that we often get gorgeous weather. The other is that each of us has a personal police radio code. Police codes, which are law enforcement shorthand for various incidents or situations, start with the number ten; so does our birth month.

  

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