Steve Kraske | KBIA

Steve Kraske

Steve Kraske is an associate teaching professor of journalism at UMKC, a political columnist for The Kansas City Star and has hosted "Up to Date" since 2002. He worked as the full-time political correspondent for The Star from 1994-2013 covering national, state and local campaigns. He also has covered the statehouses in Topeka and Jefferson City.

Before arriving in Kansas City, he worked at daily newspapers in Iowa and Illinois and at United Press International in Madison, Wis. Kraske is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he received a bachelor's degree in journalism. He was a 1992 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University.

Kraske has won awards for both his print and radio work and has appeared on NPR, CNN and Fox. He's a big fan of "Prairie Home Companion" and Kansas City jazz. His father lives in Stillwater, Minn., not far from the St. Croix River.

Segment 1: A NASA Hall-of-Famer discusses the Apollo 11 mission.

Five decades after witnessing the first man step on the moon, Lynn Bondurant shared his deep knowledge of the monumental mission to explain what it took to fly three men the 238,900 miles to Earth's most notable satellite — and back!

Segment 1: Finding affordable housing in the suburbs can be a challenge.

Gladstone, Missouri, plays host this weekend to a summit aimed at exchanging ideas and solutions to affordable housing problems in first-ring suburbs. Cities around the country are attacking the issue proactively, and some of what they've learned could help ease things in the Kansas City region. 

Segment 1: Kansas City area residents react to the president's Twitter attack

President Trump's tweets telling four Democratic congresswomen to "go back" to their countries of origin sparked outrage. A panel of women of color shared their thoughts on the president's remarks and the message his words send to minorities in this country. 

Segment 1: Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg in town for veterans project

As the second youngest mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and the first openly gay Democratic presidential candidate, Pete Buttigieg has made his way into the news. He discussed how he wants to approach the border crisis, Trump's racist tweets and the Veterans Community Project in Kansas City. 

Segment 1: A "dark store theory" update

The Kansas Board of Tax Appeals handed Johnson County a defeat last month when they ruled the county has overcharged some Walmart stores millions of dollars in property taxes. The decision is based on something called the "dark store theory," and it could put homeowners on the hook for making up the county's lost revenue.

Segment 1: Educators see more vaping in schools, and researchers are beginning to understand how e-cigarettes affect lungs

Segment 1: Busing to desegregate schools: then and now

For some, busing throughout the 1970s, '80s and '90s held a negative connotation. But education professor Erica Frankenberg and reporter Lynn Horsely say it ultimately benefitted students and communities, including Kansas City, Missouri.

Segment 1: Where a new mother lives often affects her ability to find treatment

Postpartum depression affects women of all demographics, but those in rural areas are particularly unable to take advantage of certain treatment options. Kansas City medical professionals reviewed some of the resources available in the region and discussed the challenges of connecting those to the mothers who most need them.

Segment 1: Kris Kobach announces his senate campaign for the 2020 election

Pat Roberts is retiring from his seat in the U.S. Senate, which leaves it open for the 2020 election. Former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach just announced his candidacy which immediately received criticism from some fellow Republicans. Stephen Koranda and Bob Beatty discussed Kobach's strategy and what his chances of winning look like. 

Segment 1: Medical marijuana in Kansas, and the use of hemp in farming

In the first conversation, reporter Nomin Ujyediin broke down why she thinks the path to legalization of medical marijuana in Kansas is a rocky one. Then, reporter Brian Grimmett discussed the industrialization of hemp in Kansas.

Kansas Governor Laura Kelly

Jul 3, 2019

State's chief executive offers insights on her first session in office and her plans for moving Kansas forward

Governor Kelly explained how she is working with Republicans despite pushback from party leaders on everything from Medicaid to the budget. Kelly acknowledged that state prison conditions are a top priority and that she will entertain every alternative to avoid building a new prison "at all cost."

Segment 1: Two years after Kansas prison riots, facilities are still overcrowded and understaffed.

In 2017 riots broke out in Kansas prisons highlighting the understaffed and overcrowded conditions that exist there. State lawmakers said those conditions still exist and even with the steps taken in the latest session to correct them there is still a long way to go.

Segment 1: Jackson County officials respond to skyrocketing property assessment values.

The Jackson County Legislature has asked County Executive Frank White to re-do property assessment this year because of a dramatic spike in values. The county assessor and legislative leaders discussed how to fix the problem, and why the assessments have historically been so low. 

Segment 1: Former U.S. Congressman from Missouri feels Trump administration is 'illegitimate'

Former Republican Tom Coleman, left no doubt about his call for President Trump's impeachent and why he thinks the party should unite against the current administration. 

Segment 1: Now that controversial diversity training has been approved, embattled superintendent is "just ready to move forward on behalf of young people."   

When Lee's Summit R-7 District Superintendent Dennis Carpenter proposed diversity training for the staff, he received backlash from some in the community and among employees. Carpenter spoke on what the months-long dispute could mean for the district's future and what the diversity training is about. 

Segment 1: Investors invited to consider five areas in Kansas City, Missouri, in need of development capital.

The Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce is hosting a summit to introduce potential investors to federally designated "opportunity zones" that are ready for revitalizaton.  Participants explained the plan that focuses on establishing more jobs and more locally-owned businesses in economically disadvantaged communities. 

Segment 1: An overhaul of the public transportation system needs input from residents.  

The Kansas City Area Transportation Authority and RideKC is undertaking a system redesign that would bring more than just new bus routes to the metro. To help meet the current needs of riders, they are surveying residents and commuters to find out what's most important to them in public transit.

Segment 1: An inside look with the people whose job it is to get a candidate elected.

A panel of political operatives revealed the challenges of money, time and resilience in running several of the recent campaigns for Kansas City, Missouri mayor and city council.

Segment 1: Newest Kansas and Missouri lawmakers express frustration with statehouse power structures.

First-term Kansas and Missouri House representatives detailed the challenges they faced as members of the minority party in their respective chambers.

Segment 1: How tariffs are affecting  business, food producers and consumers. 

In May, China issued tariffs on U.S. goods, and just about everyone in the Heartland is feeling the impact. 

Segment 1: Post-election wrap-up with new Kansas City mayor.

Voters selected a new mayor for Kansas City, as well as some new council members. We spoke with mayor-elect Quinton Lucas then analyzed Tuesday's election results. 

Segment 1: USDA research facilities will relocate to Kansas City area.

The headquarters of the Economic Research Service and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture will soon move to Kansas City. We discussed the news with the Kansas City Area Development Council and heard from U.S. Reps. Sharice Davids and Emanuel Cleaver.

Segment 1: Mark Dupree wants to make the Unified Government's justice system more equitable.

Wyandotte County District Attorney Mark Dupree talked with us about the summer expungement program, a new conviction integrity unit and the prosecution of Lamonte McIntyre, and calls from community members to fire Police Chief Terry Ziegler. It all fits into his larger effort to correct past wrongs in his jurisdiction.

Segment 1: An American tradition revived.

In their first iteration, victory gardens provided much needed food for Americans at home and abroad fighting World War I. Now the victory garden concept can be seen in community gardens helping social organizations and food pantries, which often struggle to stock and distribute fresh fruits and vegetables.

Segment 1: Kansas City native reveals how her interest in politics developed.

Sarah McCammon discussed her coverage of abortion including what has occurred in her home state, how she started in public radio and what her Kansas City childhood was like. 

Segment 2, beginning at 25:43: Kansas City mayoral candidate conversations

Segment 1: How conservative ideology could be bad for white Americans' well-being.

Sociologist Jonathan Metzl discussed how rightist policies for health care, guns and racial hierarchies could mean more health problems for whites. 

Segment 1: Candidates for 6th District at-Large discuss plans for Kansas City.

Candidates Andrea Bough and Stacey Johnson-Cosby each offered their approach to financing affordable housing, transparency in Kansas City government and a Tenant Bill of Rights. 

Segment 1: Candidates for 3rd District at-Large discuss plans for Kansas City

Missouri Rep. Brandon Ellington and Rev. Wallace Hartsfield talked about their approach to reduce crime east of Troost, provide access to education and jobs, and downtown tax incentives.  

Segment 1: Why integration is still important in modern society and how students are positivey affected by it. 

Integration was most prevalent in the 1970s and 80s, but professor Rucker Johnson believes it has disappeared in modern society and needs to make a come back. Hear his thoughts on past integration efforts and the current segregation of schools. 

Segment 1: Candidates for the Kansas City's 3rd District debate for Councilman Jermaine Reed's seat.

We asked candidates Melissa Robinson and Joey Thomas their thoughts on affordable housing, development east of Troost and how to improve community policing.

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