Suzanne Hogan | KBIA

Suzanne Hogan

Suzanne Hogan graduated from the College of Santa Fe in New Mexico, with a degrees in Political Science and Documentary Studies. Her interests include Latin American politics, immigration and storytelling in a variety of mediums including photography, film/video and writing. 

After college, Suzanne moved back to her hometown, Kansas City and was the Producer for The Walt Bodine Show for about two years. Now she serves as a part-time announcer, producer, and contributing reporter, filling in around the station wherever she can. Suzanne is also a founding member of the 816 Bicycle Collective, a recycle a bicycle program in Kansas City.

In her spare time, Suzanne  plays bass in a punk rock band, enjoys spontaneous traveling, and riding her bicycle all around town.

In this episode of KCUR's new podcast, A People's History of Kansas City, host Suzanne Hogan and Matthew Long-Middleton tell the story of the pugnacious Kansas sheriff and attorney general Vern Miller, whose antics seemed to be a throwback to the Wild West era but left a surprising legacy.

Jim The Wonder Dog

Mar 19, 2020

The real life story of an amazingly intelligent dog who captured people's imagination in Depression-era Missouri.

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | Stitcher

Leila's Hair Museum

Mar 12, 2020

A cosmetologist becomes obsessed with the Victorian tradition of hair art, and amasses the world's largest collection in Independence, Missouri. Each of these art pieces is woven with human hair, often in memory of loved ones and friends. Leila's Hair Museum has revived the art and launched a 21st century tradition of hair jewelry.

The story of the pugnacious Kansas sheriff and attorney general Vern Miller, whose antics seemed to be a throwback to the Wild West era but left a surprising legacy.

The oldest continuously-operating Latino services center in the United States is right here in Kansas City. 101 years ago, the Guadalupe Center was established to "Americanize" Mexicans who had moved here to work on the railroads. But over the course of a century, Latinos transformed the organization, and Kansas City.

Many early, unique dialects of German are preserved in communities in small towns in Missouri and Kansas. But they're endangered. Meet a handful of linguistic diehards in Cole Camp, Missouri, and hear about their valiant efforts to save their immigrant history. 

The prestigious, historically black high school in Kansas City is becoming more integrated. Hear how Lincoln's alumni, students and faculty are trying to make sure the school's legacy as an incubator for black excellence is not forgotten.

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play

Listen to this episode of A People's History Of Kansas City, a new podcast from KCUR 89.3. For more stories like this one, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, SpotifyGoogle Play or Stitcher.

In the center of downtown Kansas City, Kansas, between the public library and government buildings just off Minnesota Avenue, sits a two-acre cemetery.

The sign reads "Huron Indian Cemetery," but it’s also known as the Wyandot National Burying Ground and has long been a sacred place for members of the Wyandot Nation.

Three sisters barricaded themselves in a Wyandot cemetery in downtown Kansas City, Kansas, in the early 1900s, in order to save it from destruction. Hear how the Wyandot came to settle in Kansas, and how one of those sisters, Lyda Conley, took the battle over the cemetery all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Your soundtrack for getting ready for Super Bowl LIV could start with tight end Travis Kelce's pick, "(You Gotta) Fight For Your Right (To Party!)" by the Beastie Boys, which he sang (or, rather, screamed) at fans after Kansas City's win in the AFC Championship game.

Or the stadium rock anthem and Queen classic, "We Are The Champions."

But it might be a little early for that...

Segment 1: Local lawyer finds a niche in space law

Space is an exciting new frontier, challenging humanity to advance in math, science, and engineering. But what about law? We hear from a Kansas City lawyer who has made a name for himself in dealing with the ownership of objects originating from space.

  • Chris McHugh, lawyer

Segment 2, beginning at 15:35: Mark Twain's love letter to American cuisine

Segment 1: How to run.

It's finally spring and that means sunshine, flowers and people jogging outside. We visit with a local coach to find out how to get "in the zone" about running.

Segment 2, beginning at 12:40: How floods shaped Kansas City.

Segment 1: Are you using your phone to read this? Us too.

A cell phone today is basically just as important as our wallet and keys; we do not want to leave the house without it. But is this reliance actually an addiction? We talk with parents and smartphone users about why phones are so addictive and how they are affecting our moods, motivations, and parenting.

Segment 1: The debate over free pre-kindergarten. 

At face value, the idea of universal preschool sounds great. And that's exactly what Kansas City Mayor Sly James is trying to accomplish with his proposal calling for a sales tax to fund it. But he's facing quite a bit of opposition, notably from the local school districts. Mayor James joins us to lay out his plan, and then school superintendent Dan Clemens explains his concerns with the proposal.

Segment 1: Fallout from a snowstorm. 

From a missing snow-person to more serious issues like coping with school closures from one district to another, Kansas Citians have stories about this crazy snowfall. Plus, KCP&L explains why some people's power comes on faster than others after widespread outages.

Segment 1: Local lawyer finds a niche in space law.

Space is an exciting new frontier challenging humanity to advance in math, science, and engineering. But what is it mean for advances in the law. Who owns space? We hear from a Kansas City lawyer who has made a name for himself in dealing with the ownership of objects originating from space.

  • Chris McHugh, lawyer

Segment 2, beginning at 15:25: Instagram stars of Kansas City.

Segment 1: Mark Twain's love letter to American cuisine.

Samuel Clemens, AKA Mark Twain, was an avid writer and traveler. He was also a champion of America's regional foods. While homesick in Europe, he wrote an extensive list of the foods he missed, like prairie hen and peach cobbler. On this episode, we speak with the author who's been following in Twain's culinary footsteps, first for a book in 2011, and now for a podcast.

Hosted by Gina Kaufmann, KCUR's Central Standard explored more than 500 topics and invited more than 700 people to share their expertise and stories on the daily talk show in 2018.

With so many conversations, there's no way to convey the breadth and depth of topics we covered. But in the spirit of year-end reflection, we decided to highlight some of our favorite dicsussions.

Segment 1: Comedy is comedy for kids and adults.

Mo Willems has written for Sesame Street and has authored many children's books with iconic characters such as Pigeon and Knuffle Bunny. We talk with him about the many emotions and lessons depicted in his books. His most recent exhibit, The Pigeon Comes to Topeka!, is on display until January 4th.

Segment 1: Jabari Asim on race in America.

"We Can't Breathe" is a collection of essays exploring how the legacy of racism fits into the stories we tell about our past. On this episode, author and St. Louis native Jabari Asim discusses storytelling in his St. Louis neighborhood, the complexity of the founding fathers, and why racism doesn't surprise him.

For some, genetic testing can provide answers to lifelong questions. But DNA also raises unique ethical conundrums when it comes to privacy and discrimination. On this episode, we dive into the personal stories and moral curiosities about DNA.

Guests:

Segment 1: Kansas City poet wins International Latino Book Award

A local poet has won two major awards this year, for her work in both English and Spanish. On this episode, we speak with Xánath Caraza about poetry as a way to break silence, the best way to produce a lot of art, and the women that have had significant influence on her life. 

Of the 40 million people who died in World War I, only 441 were from around Kansas City. With so few casualties from this area, how did the national museum and memorial for this war end up here?

Mike Vietti, the museum's marketing director, hears this question a lot.

"This really was, in many respects, a crowdsourced National Museum and Memorial," Vietti says.

To understand why Kansas City was up to that challenge requires remembering what the city was like a hundred years ago.

1918 in Kansas City

Segment 1: How to remember war.

How World War 1 was a pivotal moment in how we memorialize wars, with Kansas City's Liberty Memorial playing a key role.

Segment 1: A Kansas City musician's self-proclaimed 'nerdy rap.'

Kadesh Flow is a trombonist with The Phantastics. He released "Room Service," a solo hip-hop album, which he recorded in a hotel room during a gamer convention. Hear more of his story, from leaving his job at Cerner to pursue music to being part of the Nerdy People of Color Collective.

In her new album, "Dirty Computer," Janelle Monáe reveals more of herself than ever before. And, in recent weeks, she has been sharing more of her story, from her background in Kansas City, Kansas, to her sexuality. A look at the music, life and persona of Janelle Monáe ... and what her story means to Kansas Citians.

Segment 1: It's never too late to travel back home, even when you're 90 years old.

We visit with a Kansas City filmmaker and actress about a locally-made movie exploring themes of aging, memories and wanderlust.

Bob Jones Shoes has been a staple in downtown Kansas City since 1960. When the retailer announced it was closing its doors in August, many shoe aficionados in Kansas City were aghast.

They've flocked to the final days of the footwear mecca to find that last perfect "fit," take advantage of the going-out-of-business sale and pay their respects to what has become a local icon.

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