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Donald Trump

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson says it's premature be discussing the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump before hearings are conducted, calling it "a lot of political hype."

Parson said Friday during the Missouri Press Association Meeting in Kansas City that the training he received while serving in the Army was that the commander in chief is the military's highest-ranking officerHe says that, "to a certain degree, whether you like the president or not, is not as important as the fact that he is the president."

The president’s latest attack on the press get louder, as calls for more detail surrounding the call with the Ukrainian president identify. How does his finger pointing erode the public’s trust in news reporting?

Courtesy New York Times

It’s been 400 years since the first slave ship landed on shores of what would become the United States of America. This week, a look at how the New York Times Magazine commemorated the moment, and the lasting impact it could have on the reframing of American history.

Subscriptions soar following a Baltimore Sun editorial in response to President Trump’s attack on the livability of the city. Are Americans voting with their dollars?

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri judge ruled former Gov. Eric Greitens’ use of the disappearing chat app Confide did not violate the state’s Sunshine Law because it functions similarly to a telephone. But does it?

Migrant children in a Texas border facility have been living in squalor, without access to sanitation supplies such as soap and toothpaste. Reporters’ access to the facility, and others like it, has been limited, making reporting on the conditions difficult.

Courtesy HBO

It’s game over for Game of Thrones. How did fans respond to the series finale? And, what might that mean for HBO and the future of its streaming service?

via Flickr user samchills

An editorial cartoon containing anti-Semitic tropes appeared in Thursday’s international editions of the New York Times. An internal investigation has led to some changes in newsroom policy, but no clear public explanation as to how it wound up in the paper in the first place. Do we deserve one? 

New York Times Opinion via Twitter: “We apologize…

The screening of ‘The Commons’ during the True/False Film Festival led to a lot of off-screen action as several students featured in the film challenged the filmmakers’ process. Was their work journalism? Or something else?

Families earning $60,000 or less are experiencing the greatest impact from state officials’ confusion over how to calculate income tax withholdings.

Joel Walters, director of the state Department of Revenue, said during Wednesday’s hearing that based on almost 1 million returns that the department has processed, “the average refund is down about $78, and the average tax due is up about $65.”

Returns claiming a tax refund have gone down by around 68,000 compared to the amount last year, Walters said.

VCU Capital News Service

A tip from a “concerned citizen” has created a controversy around the governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, Ralph Northam.

Tom Brokaw has apologized for his comments about Hispanics and assimilation made on Meet the Press on Sunday. But that apology has raised more questions than answers.

Viral videos often make news, but what happens when they don’t tell the whole story? What can we learn from what happened on the National Mall this weekend between a high school student and Native American elder?

Mitch Legan / KBIA

Bird Scooters has been making news in Columbia for months. Now, its making headlines around the world for its claim of a copyright violation by a tech news website. Was it a fair claim?

CNN has filed a federal lawsuit against President Donald Trump and several aides, fighting to have White House Correspondent Jim Acosta’s press credential reinstated. How have other reporters fared in the past, suing the president for access?

The Views of the News team returns tomorrow at 6 p.m. Join Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry for a complete look at the coverage of today's election, from a local, state and national level. 

Details are slowly starting to emerge about what might have happened to journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside the Saudi embassy in Istanbul. How aggressively is the Trump administration really pressing for answers? And, how are news organizations changing their approach to working in Saudi Arabia.

Hatice Cengiz, New York Times: “My fiancé Jamal Khashoggi was a lonely patriot

via Flickr user Michael Mueller

If we don’t make some changes soon, we’re heading for ‘climate catastrophe.” That’s the message from a report from the United Nations this week. The headlines are hyperbolic, the reporting is there, but will it make people care?

Kavanaugh accuser Christine Blasey Ford
Fox News

Thursday is shaping up to potentially be the biggest news day of the year. In Washington, Judge Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein meets face-to-face with President Donald Trump following a New York Times exclusive.

Claire McCaskill
studio08denver / Flickr

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump will urge the defeat of Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill during a campaign rally next week in her Missouri home state.

Trump's campaign says he will rally supporters Sept. 13 in Cape Girardeau and urge them to replace McCaskill with Republican Josh Hawley, the state attorney general who has Trump's endorsement. Trump won Missouri by 18 percentage points in 2016. McCaskill is a top target for Republicans seeking to expand the party's slim 51-49 edge in the U.S. Senate.

The tributes and remembrances of Sen. John McCain continue to flow. His relationship with the media wasn’t always friendly, but it was one of cooperation and mutual respect. We’ll remember him on this week’s program.

Mary Papenfuss, Huffington Post: “NBC cuts to awkward ‘Talent’ scene after solemn McCain report

Why did a Florida judge came down hard on the South Florida Sun Sentinel for publishing information it published about the Parkland school shooter that it obtained legally?

Courtesy Simon & Shuster

Who is unhinged? It’s the title of Omarosa Manigault-Newman’s new book and it’s got just about everyone – including the president – talking. We’ll talk about how the hype built up through the week and why it’s not really selling.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

President Trump is home from Helsinki and hearing the reaction to his joint news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin, and backing off some of Monday’s statements.

David Beard, Poynter: “Trump visit ‘exhausting’ British press corps

Brian Stelter, CNN: “Trump ratchets up ‘fake news’ rally cry overseas during UK visit

Maybe it’s time to retire the White House Correspondents’ Dinner? Michelle Wolf’s 15-minute act has many in our profession questioning the mission and purpose of the annual gala, and whether it’s time to put an end to it.

via Flickr Brian Solis

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared before Congress to answer questions about users’ privacy on the social media platform. At least one senator inquired as to why users don’t seem clear on how their data is collected and used. Could it lead to regulation?

via Flickr user www.quotecatalog.com

Who’s really at fault? Cambridge Analytica, Facebook, or the millions of users around the globe who relied on a social platform to keep their data safe and protected? As Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is called before lawmakers in the U.S. and the U.K. to answer to data breaches affecting more than 50 million users, it’s a fair question to ask. When the product is free, are you the product?

Grounds of Gateway Arch Get a New Name

Feb 26, 2018

The grounds of the Gateway Arch in St. Louis will now be officially known as The Gateway Arch National Park.

President Donald Trump on Thursday signed a bill that renamed the former Jefferson National Expansion Memorial.

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