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Education

Hickman High School
Meiying Wu / KBIA

The Columba Public School Board voted 6 -1 Monday night to begin the school year entirely online – a change from the intended in-person/hybrid plan introduced just a few weeks ago.


UM System Announces Budget Cut Across All 4 Campuses

Apr 14, 2020

The University of Missouri System could see up to 15% in budget cuts as part of the system's response to the financial toll of COVID-19, system officials announced Tuesday morning.

The budget cuts could lead to layoffs, unpaid leaves, restructuring, strict cost containment and other measures, according to a message from chancellors of the four UM campuses. Options will be evaluated at each individual campus. Some decisions must be made by April 30 as the system works to complete a fiscal year 2021 budget by June 7.

Sharon McCutcheon/Unsplash

Columbia Public Schools announced a new learning plan that includes eliminating letter grades and designating days of the week for certain subjects and forms of communication.

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

The University of Missouri System will be out $36.5 million for the rest of the current fiscal year as part of a series of spending cuts Governor Mike Parson announced Wednesday. In a statement, UM System President Mun Choi said, "we must all work together to get past this crisis."

MU Chancellor Cartwright Interviews to Lead University of Central Florida

Mar 18, 2020
Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

MU Chancellor Alexander Cartwright was interviewed by the University of Central Florida on Wednesday in the search for its next president.

Cartwright, not previously named as a candidate by the university, was revealed as part of the search Wednesday morning and was one of three candidates interviewed by UCF's committee.

Kassidy Arena / KBIA

 

A blonde teenager balanced a stack of papers in his hand as he spoke with his Honors Humanities professor. He had something to announce to the class.

His name is Greg Pierson and he is running for City Council.

In order to officially announce his candidacy, Pierson needed at least 50 signatures on his petition. To earn even more signatures, he also carried with him a stack of voter registration forms since only Missouri voters’ signatures on the petition would be valid.

Meiying Wu / KBIA

To read more about High School 2.0, visit our media partner the Columbia Missourian.

COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT

Kassidy Arena / KBIA

 

MU senior Daniel Serres and junior Vanessa Ramírez walked into a room with 15 other student entrepreneurs. Each team had their own business idea and vied for the opportunity to win up to $30,000 in start-up funds after pitching their idea to a panel of judges. The 15 businesses had been chosen from a pool of 50 applicants.

“Every room we walk in, we’re constantly thinking like, how we can collaborate with people,” Ramírez said. “So we see competition, but at the same time, we also see potential relationships.”

 

Shaashawn Dial has worn a lot of hats. She’s a poet. A former host of an R&B radio station. A former head of equity and affirmative action in a state capitol. A business owner. 

But perhaps the most important role is a mentor. She’s helped people leave abusive relationships, adults get their GEDs and undergraduate students navigate college life. 

And now Dial is the first director of diversity, equity and inclusion at Stephen's College.

“I am about women making decisions for themselves mentally, physically, spiritually, economically,” Dial said.

Pickard Hall, Fixture of MU's Historic Quad, To Be Demolished

Nov 14, 2019
Pickard Hall on a sunny day at the University of Missouri
Photo Provided / University of Missouri News Bureau

MU officials announced on Thursday their decision to demolish Pickard Hall following a decade of thwarted attempts to clean up the building's radioactive contamination.

Work to raze the building will begin as soon as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approves MU's plan, submitted last week, university officials told the Missourian in an interview prior to their announcement. They estimate the demolition will cost $12 million and take two years to complete.

Kassidy Arena / KBIA

 

Centro Latino Offers Haven to Latino Community

Oct 28, 2019
Dorothy Scales / Centro Latino de Salud

 

Complete Transcript:

 

Host Introduction: Welcome to Exam on KBIA, where we talk all about education and academic issues all across Missouri. I'm Kassidy Arena and this week, KBIA's Xcaret Nunez went to Centro Latino, a place that provides resources to Columbia's immigrant population.

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

The #metoo movement shed light on people in power taking advantage of those working for them, but in many homes across mid-Missouri, the power imbalance is right there…in people’s marriages, dating relationships and other partnerships with people. Mary Beck is looking to change that.

She is the director of the Family Violence Clinic where she oversees law students who represent survivors of domestic violence. These students help survivors with a litigation plan, economic plan and safety plan.

Kassidy Arena / KBIA

  Dr. James Wells, professor of Classics at DePauw University in Indiana visited the MU campus to talk about the importance of translation in modern day.

Wells himself wasn’t aware of the classics until well into his own undergraduate studies. He first went to school to study science.

“A D in Biology and a little note on my first calculus test, which read, I suggest you perhaps drop this course and try again in the future sort of tanked my career as a scientist,” Wells said.

Kassidy Arena / KBIA

  

Thrive Coffee and Creamery has the aesthetic of any Instagram-able business on the outside: tiffany blue adornments, flowers on the counter, homemade ice creams. But the similarities end there. Thrive is a 100 percent nonprofit corporation with the goal of giving every dollar earned back to the community.

Jane Mather-Glass / KBIA

Kristin Bowen is the leader of Columbia’s local Moms Demand Action group. Moms Demand Action is a locally-funded group that focuses on gun safety with chapters across the United States.

Bowen started the Columbia organization in 2015 because she said the issue of gun violence, like many parents, affected her emotionally.

Kassidy Arena / KBIA

Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat have more in common than just social outreach—they harm young girls’ self-perceived body image.

Studies show the more adolescent females see unrealistic body types and filters, the more likely they will suffer from low self-esteem or poor self-confidence.

Toronto, Canada’s York University Professor of Psychology Jennifer Mills and Ph.D. student Jacqueline Hogue recently released their study which found “actively engaging with attractive peers’ social media causes worsened body image in young adult women.”


 

After being approved at the Columbia City Council meeting April 15, certain schools can now have more than six chickens on their property. The amendment was proposed to enhance STEAM programming.

Aside from an annual 10-day project in elementary school classrooms, no public schools in Columbia raise chickens.

But starting this fall, Jefferson and Fairview Elementary School will be the first two to raise them long-term. Fairview is transitioning to become a place-based school, which emphasizes a focus on the school's surrounding environment over places only accessible in textbooks or technology.

KBIA's Charlie Clarke and Columbia Missourian reporter Hannah Hoffmeister went around to some of the district's schools to see how chickens are currently used in schools and how they'll be implemented in the future.

Kassidy Arena / KBIA

All-Star Performance Institute in Columbia, Missouri trains athletes from the age of three or four all the way up to their teen years.

The athletes there, commonly known as cheerleaders, don’t fulfill the traditional idea of pom-pom-wielding boosters on the sides of sports games, rather they compete in their own sport.

Competitive cheer is a sport that requires athletes to combine gymnastics and dance abilities. The major stunts in the routines require “bases” to throw “flyers” ten or 15 feet in the air and catch them before the hit the spring-loaded floor.


Meiying Wu / KBIA

Columbia School Board election winners Della Streaty-Wilhoit and Blake Willoughby were sworn into their positions on the board Monday night, after a handful of months campaigning and one victorious night celebrating.

Streaty-Wilhoit and Willoughby are replacing retiring members James Whitt and Jan Mees, who stepped down from their positions Monday. Whitt and Mees both acknowledged they experienced a learning curve when first placed on the board and had some advice for the incoming members.


Columbia Board of Education election winners Della Streaty-Wilhoit and Blake Willoughby were sworn into their positions on the board Monday night, after a handful of months campaigning and one victorious night celebrating.

Streaty-Wilhoit and Willoughby are replacing retiring members James Whitt and Jan Mees, who stepped down from their positions Monday. Whitt and Mees both acknowledged they experienced a learning curve when first placed on the board and had some advice for the incoming members.

Stephanie Carlo

Stephanie Carlo followed her dream of being in the fashion world by assisting designer Gustavo Arango in Puerto Rico. While working under his wing, Carlo’s friend recommended her for a teaching position at Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri. Carlo spoke briefly to the recruiter and decided to follow a new passion of hers: teaching.

Carlo packed her bags and left her entire family on the island to teach fashion design and product development, among other courses, at the all-womens college. Her weekdays consist of teaching back-to-back classes and meetings, but her work isn’t limited to Monday through Friday. On weekends, Carlo helps her students with their collections on her own time.


Exam - Columbia School Board Candidate Wrap-Up

Apr 1, 2019
Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

April 2nd is General Municipal Election Day and many mid-Missourians will head to the polls to vote for city council members, school board members, mayors and some areas like Southern Boone, Cole County and Fayette will vote on a few different proposals.

Here on Exam, we have spoke with the three candidates running for Columbia Public School's Board of Education: Della Streaty-Wilhoit, Blake Willoughby and Jay Atkins. On today’s episode, we are going to recap those conversations.


Columbia School Board candidates Q&A: Academic disparities

Mar 21, 2019

The Missourian submitted a list of 10 standardized questions to the three candidates for Columbia School Board.

The candidates' answers will be published in a series. Here are their answers to the following question from Missourian readers:

Gaps in academic achievement among different groups of students, particularly between black and white students, persist in the district. What do you think explains those disparities? What would you propose to address them?


Columbia School Board candidates Q&A: Attendance zones

Mar 21, 2019

The Missourian submitted a list of 10 standardized questions to the three candidates for Columbia School Board.

The candidates' answers will be published in a series. Here are their answers to the following question from Missourian readers:

The recent change in school attendance zones, effective for the fall 2020 school year, showed again how hard it is to balance the socioeconomic status of students from school to school. How can the board and the district improve that going forward?


Three candidates - Blake Willoughby, Jay Atkins and Della Streaty-Wilhoit - are running for two open seats on the Columbia Board of Education on April 2. KBIA spoke with three Columbia Missourian reporters, each of who has been covering a candidate.

Seth Bodine / KBIA

Columbia Board of Education candidate Jay Atkins said if he could imagine a perfect school district, it would be one that had 100 percent literacy at the third-grade level.

For Atkins, who has three children in the Columbia Public Schools and a fourth that will soon enter, literacy is on the top of his campaign agenda. He said he decided to run because he wanted to be more involved and make sure schools are under proper stewardship.


Sidney Steele / KBIA

Blake Willoughby is the youngest candidate for the Columbia Board of Education, by a sizeable margin. While some might see this as negative, Willoughby sees this as one of his greatest advantages.

“I bring a fresh perspective of being a young, community engaged, artist-educator,” Willoughby said. “I am the closest in age to understanding what our kids are navigating when they graduate high school and become life-ready.”


Kassidy Arena / KBIA

Ardella Streaty-Wilhoit, or more commonly known as Della, is passionate about educating youth. She describes herself as a family woman first and candidate for the Columbia Public School’s Board of Education second.

“I got up one morning, and I just simply told my husband, you know, I think I will file for school board,” Streaty-Wilhoit said. Her shoulders shook as she laughed about the out-of-the-blue assertion.

Streaty-Wilhoit grew up in a household of 12. Her parents instilled in her and her siblings that education is wealth, and there are no shortcuts. Streaty-Wilhoit took this advice seriously. She earned her PhD in Food and Natural Resources at MU at 50 years old.


Wade Sisler / NASA

MU graduate student Marlee Baldridge did not major in science, she does not have any scientific background nor did she ever participate in lab work. Baldridge, though, spent her fall as an intern for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

Even with a lack of professional science training, Baldridge’s main job as a NASA communicator was to take the science the scientists researched and translate it for the general public to understand.

“Goddard helped build the James Webb space telescope which is said to launch in the 2020s and it is the most powerful telescope we’ve ever built,” Baldridge said. “It can see so far, it can see light so old, it’s near the beginnings of the universe. So we describe it not just as a telescope to people, we describe it as a time machine because it’s going to let us understand how the universe actually formed.”


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