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#Missouri judge ruled former Gov. Eric Greitens’ use of the disappearing chat app #Confide did not violate the state’s#SunshineLaw because it functions similarly to a telephone. But does it? Also, the status of a Memphis reporter released from #ICEcustody, a candidate’s request a female reporter have a male chaperone on a reporting trip, and Netflix’s decision to re-edit '13 Reasons Why.’ From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

In 1932 and 1933 Joseph Stalin deliberately starved between three and ten million residents of Ukraine – no one knows the number for sure – and he tried to keep it secret.  When a later official Soviet census showed a multi-million person decline in Ukraine’s population, Stalin did the only thing he could do.  He had the top officials of the census executed.

So the pollsters recently fired by President Trump because internal polling showed Trump was behind in several battleground states should consider themselves lucky.  But Trump has a point.  People: IT IS A YEAR AND A HALF UNTIL THE ELECTION.  


Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri judge ruled former Gov. Eric Greitens’ use of the disappearing chat app Confide did not violate the state’s Sunshine Law because it functions similarly to a telephone. But does it?

Migrant children in a Texas border facility have been living in squalor, without access to sanitation supplies such as soap and toothpaste. Reporters' access to the facility, and others like it, has been limited, making reporting on the conditions difficult. Also, why it seemed rape allegations against President Trump were downplayed, an exaggeration of tourist deaths in the Dominican Republic , and Twitter's decision to end geotagging on tweets. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Migrant children in a Texas border facility have been living in squalor, without access to sanitation supplies such as soap and toothpaste. Reporters’ access to the facility, and others like it, has been limited, making reporting on the conditions difficult.

Commentary: History's View of D-Day

Jun 23, 2019

Seventy-five years ago this week my late father, Lt. H. Bruce Smith, went ashore on Omaha Beach.  He was an Army combat engineer and a demolitions expert – a sapper.  The unit he had trained with went ashore on D-Day in the first wave and suffered 80 percent casualties, but because of a training accident my father was hospitalized for three weeks and then attached to a different unit that didn’t arrive in Normandy until late June.

President Trump goes back to the future for the launch of his re-election campaign. He accuses The New York Times of treason and urges his departing press secretary to run for governor of Arkansas. Plus, a discussion of the media’s over-reliance on polls in their campaign coverage. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: it’s KBIA 91.3 FM ’s Views of the News.

Donald Trump officially kicks off his 2020 re-election campaign with a rally in Orlando.  The event comes during a week where the president backtracks on a statement that he might not tell the FBI about offers of dirt on his opponents and his adversarial press secretary announces her resignation.

Trump launches re-election bid

YouTube’s ban on hate speech produces mixed results as Congress puts Big Tech under the microscope. Newspapers want lawmakers to help them compete with Google and Facebook. Seeing (and hearing) is definitely not believing when it comes to the latest examples of deep fakes. And Volkswagen hopes Simon & Garfunkel – plus a new diesel micro-bus – will help you forget about Diesel-gate. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News.

YouTube says it's banning hateful and extremist speech from neo-Nazis, white supremacists and terrorists.  But that's a tough task.  And in the past few days, the social media giant has also taken down videos -- at least temporarily -- from people fighting hate speech by quoting some of the perpetrators.  Is the solution to bad speech really less speech? 

Is the internet broken? Members of the U.S. House of Representatives think so, and will begin investigating potential #antitrust violations among some of America’s tech giants. First up? A hearing on the effects companies like Google and Facebook have had on local #journalism. Also, identifying the man believed to have produced the “drunk Pelosi” video, the first-ever Scripps National Spelling Bee octo-champs, and the end for Apple’s #iTunes. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News.

Is the internet broken? Members of the U.S. House of Representatives think so, and will begin investigating potential anti-trust violations among some of America’s tech giants. First up? A hearing on the effects companies like Google and Facebook have had on local journalism.

It’s game over for Game of Thrones. How did fans respond to the series finale? And, what might that mean for HBO and the future of its streaming service? Also, police accused of going too far to get a reporter to reveal his sources, a presidential pardon for media mogul Conrad Black and a teen from St. Louis scoops the national media. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy HBO

It’s game over for Game of Thrones. How did fans respond to the series finale? And, what might that mean for HBO and the future of its streaming service?

Nearly four years after the traffic stop that led to the arrest, and death, of motorist Sandra Bland, a new cell phone video emerges that tells a story different from the police dash cam video. Why di it take so long to surface? Also, the possibility a Colorado public library could be home to a newsroom, turning a legacy newspaper into a non-profit, and a call to break up Facebook. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via LinkedIn

Nearly four years after the traffic stop that led to the arrest, and death, of motorist Sandra Bland, a new cell phone video emerges that tells a story different from the police dashcam video. Why di it take so long to surface?

Two Reuters journalists jailed in Myanmar for more than 500 days were unexpectedly freed Tuesday in a widespread amnesty. What led to this twist of fate? Also, Facebook bans far-right content producers, Sinclair Broadcast Group buys 21 regional sports networks, and a goof on Game of Thrones gives America a laugh. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Two Reuters journalists jailed in Myanmar for more than 500 days were unexpectedly freed Tuesday in a widespread amnesty. What led to this twist of fate?

An editorial cartoon containing anti-Semitic tropes appeared in Thursday’s international editions of The New York Times. An internal investigation has led to some changes in newsroom policy, but no clear public explanation as to how it wound up in the paper in the first place. Do we deserve one? Also, why Amazon’s doorbell company is hiring a news editor, the global popularity of "Avengers: Endgame” and Jeopardy!’s big winner. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user samchills

An editorial cartoon containing anti-Semitic tropes appeared in Thursday’s international editions of the New York Times. An internal investigation has led to some changes in newsroom policy, but no clear public explanation as to how it wound up in the paper in the first place. Do we deserve one? 

New York Times Opinion via Twitter: “We apologize…

Television #journalists found themselves speechless as #NotreDame burned. We’ll examine the coverage here and abroad. Also, another #PulitzerPrize announcement in the shadow of tragedy, juxtaposing coverage of the measles outbreak with talk of protections for #antivaxxers, and a list of the best journalism movies ever. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Monique Luisi: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

via Wikimedia user Remi Mathis

Television journalists found themselves speechless, trying to describe the pictures on their screens, showing the centuries old cathedral consumed by flames. Two days later, we’ll examine the coverage here and abroad.

Sebastian Martinez / KBIA

Political watch parties can produce moments of high drama, with supporters waiting anxiously for results to come in, and races going down to the wire.

But as KBIA’s Sebastián Martínez Valdivia found out, when a race is uncontested, the watch party can be a little different.

He visited last night’s watch party for Columbia 4th ward councilman Ian Thomas and filed this audio postcard. The postcard features the voices of Brendon Steenbergen, Ian Thomas, Karl Skala, and Leila Gassman. 


It might be the most cringeworthy video to go viral this year. Why did the news staff at WTOL-11 produce a #hypevideo for the Toledo Public Schools? And, how might it compromise the staff’s reporting efforts in the future? Also, Infowars host Alex Jones claims ‘pyschosis,’ changes to the Oscar rules, and reporting on allegations against former vice president Joe Biden. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

Courtesy WTOL

It might be the most cringeworthy video to go viral this year. Why did the news staff at WTOL-TV produce a hype video for the Toledo Public Schools? And, how might it compromise the staff’s reporting efforts in the future?

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Missouri senators have passed legislation to make it harder to impeach top officials less than a year after the former governor resigned while facing potential impeachment.

Senators passed the proposed constitutional amendment 25-8 Thursday.

Gayle King’s interview with R. Kelly has been described as a master class for journalists. This week, an analysis of her questions, her body language, and the discussion the conversation created. Also, Facebook’s pivot to privacy, an Arkansas newspaper publisher sues over anti-BDS pledge, and the internet’s happiest day. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy CBS

Gayle King’s interview with R. Kelly has been described as a master class for journalists. This week, an analysis of her questions, her body language, and the discussion the conversation created.

The screening of ‘The Commons’ during the True/False Film Fest led to a lot of off-screen action as several students featured in the film challenged the filmmakers’ process. Was their work journalism? Or something else? Also, reaction to Leaving Neverland, reporting on a known hoax and why Google Canada is banning political advertising ahead of a federal election in that country.

From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The screening of ‘The Commons’ during the True/False Film Festival led to a lot of off-screen action as several students featured in the film challenged the filmmakers’ process. Was their work journalism? Or something else?

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