Off the Clock | KBIA

Off the Clock

Fridays at 5:20pm

KBIA News brings you a look at the arts and entertainment this week in mid-Missouri.

Taylor Carroll

The Relevant Youth is a student run creative agency disrupting education through innovation. In this edition of Off the Clock, the organization's Diveristy and Inclusion Manager Alycia Washington talks about her first event. Black Alchemy is a celebration of the black creative. And Miriam Akogu, a featured artist, talks about her art being displayed for the first time and what it means to meet other creatives in town. The event featured seven artists and a live performance by local band Loose Loose. 


Gary McClure seemed to have it all with his band American Wrestlers, which channeled frenetic energy of alternative music to a nationwide audience. Yet even with a record deal and critical acclaim, the St. Louis singer/songwriter wasn’t satisfied. With his new project Son of the Pale Youth, McClure is going back to basics. He talked with St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum about his musical evolution.


Sarah Nguyen

Columbia artist Sarah Nguyen has never attended the True/False Film Fest, and her first experience will certainly be a memorable one.

Her installation “Break Into Blossom” will be featured at the 2019 festival. Nguyen, who has lived in Columbia for less than a year, said she feels very honored to be part of the festival.

“This festival has so much weight in my mind,” she said. “I'm just psyched. I can't wait to meet the students and see the parades and, of course, see all of the other art installations and then the films.”

The True/False Film Festival is here and KBIA has been talking with filmmakers and artists.

Aviva Okeson-Haberman spoke with the director of Mike Wallace is Here, a documentary that examines the legacy of the legendary 60 minutes anchor.

Director Avi Belkin says he wanted to examine the life of a man who shaped broadcast news today. 


Onemic is a local open-mic session that gathers once a month at Cafe Berlin Downtown. Drawing people from many facets of life into one room, to listen to the many songs and poems that reveal deeply held secrets and feelings. Reporter, Brandon Eigenman has the story. 


Marquise White

Two Mizzou grads worked together to create and open the only black-owned and millenial-owned business in Columbia. The Greens Co. is a boutique and curation space located at 16 N. Nith St., in downtown Columbia. Co-Owner Marquise White says, "The Greens is the backyard in which our dreams are actualized."

Los Angeles based artist Rikki Wright's photography exhibit "SIS" will be up until March 7, 2019.

For more information follow @thegreensco on Twitter and Instagram.


Molly Dove / KBIA

Down in a side room in the basement of Hickman High School, two juniors, Conor Byrne and Sam Wills, broadcast their radio show called Dad Rock World Tour. They speak into a small laptop computer about the different songs they are about to play and it echoes through the halls with the students as they make their way to lunch.

The 90s, hipster aesthetic of the high school junior’s radio show matches perfect with the old band posters on the walls and the dimly-lit closet the radio studio is essentially in. Every day during lunch, students can come and sit on the worn down couches as a part of the club, Academy of Rock. They can visit with their friends while they eat, talk about their favorite bands and listen to the DJs.


From Shark Tank to Startup Weekends, entrepreneurship is a growing craze in the nation. More than 25 million Americans are starting or running new businesses. The University of Missouri is the latest to encourage innovation on campus. KBIA’s Betsy Smith has more on MU’s new Entrepreneur Quest Pitch Competition. 

Over 100 MU students and faculty members gathered in Monsanto Auditorium Monday morning at the first Entrepreneur Quest Pitch competition. 


One music teacher learns how to chant at the moon. Now she provides the opportunity for others to join her at Stephens Lake Park. Margaret Waddell started chanting more than a decade ago. KBIA’s Aviva Okeson-Haberman caught up with Waddell on a cool fall evening as she led new friends in moon chanting. 


A tipi sat outside the Daniel Boone Regional Library on a mid-September afternoon to teach people some valuable lessons about Native American identity. KBIA’s Betsy Smith has more on how one interdisciplinary artist tested people’s knowledge of what it means to be an Indian today. When it comes to modern representations of native culture, everything might not be what it seems.


Seth Bodine / KBIA

Alex Cunningham, a violinist from St. Louis, is in a trio that will most likely never play at a mainstream festival. Their music is an acquired taste.

Cunningham had no notes to memorize when he played with a trio made up of a saxophone player and a drummer at the dimly-lit Café Berlin last Friday. Their performance is completely improvisational. He said the trio aims to make spur-of-the-moment music. And the result, he said, is chaotic.


The 12th annual Roots N Blues N BBQ Festival featured students from Grant Elementary School.

As a part of the Roots N Blues Foundation, artists from all over the country spend the week in Columbia with students, teaching some history of blues music, writing songs and ending the week here in Flat Branch Park, showing their community what they’ve learned.

KBIA’s Molly Dove had VIP Access with the Grant Elementary Blues Corp to see “what’s going on.”

Lauren Brown

Columbia College hosted a conversation with Ron Stallworth, author of The Black Klansman on Aug 30. The memoir recalls Stallworth, a former African-American detective, and his infiltration of the Ku Klux Klan in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Stallworth spoke with KBIA about his memoir’s film adaptation Blackkklansman. The film was directed by Spike Lee and featured John David Washington as Ron Stallworth. Stallworth also discussed how important the investigation was to him and how he was able to stop violent acts within his hometown.

Scott Shy

Off the Clock – Meet Alice Wells, Missouri Contemporary Ballet’s Newest Member

Columbia’s Missouri Contemporary Ballet celebrated its 12th season last month with its original production Eclipse in Movement. This week, I talked with its newest member, Alice Wells, about the joys and challenges of working as a professional dancer for a small company. She’s 21-years-old and moved away from home at the young age of 14 to start training as a professional.

 

Erin McKinstry: “Could you start by telling me how you got started and interested in dance?”

Bussen Productions

Traditional bluegrass music is a melting pot. It has roots in Appalachian, Celtic and jazz music, and musicologists trace the origins of the banjo back to traditional stringed instruments from West Africa. It’s a genre that’s constantly evolving.

Pat Kay is a bluegrass musician and books shows at the Blue Note, a music venue in Columbia. He said the traditional style has seen a resurgence in recent years.

 


Erin McKinstry / KBIA

Three in 10 Americans now have a tattoo, according to a 2016 Harris Poll survey. But even with so much demand, getting a start as a tattoo artist can be difficult.

Gabe Garcia has owned and operated Iron Tiger Tattoo in Columbia for eight years and Tattoo You for three. He started apprenticing at the age of 18. He said getting your foot in the door takes artistic talent, extensive training, people skills and a little bit of luck.


Hannah Haynes / KBIA

 

Allison Simmons is 13 years old, but she’s been playing video games since she was 7. She meets other gamers online all the time, and she maintains friendships with some of them. But, she said, it’s not so easy to find people her own age that like the game as much as she does.

That’s one of the reasons Allison decided to go to Columbia College’s Girls Who Game event in September. The event was for girls ages 12 to 14 who are interested in gaming and game design. The girls played games in the campus’ “Gaming Hut,” which is also home to the Columbia College eSports team.


Erin McKinstry / KBIA

A couple of decades ago, trash cluttered the banks of the Missouri River.

Tires, alcohol bottles, cigarette butts and plastic interrupted the natural scenery for boaters and proved toxic for wildlife.

But, in recent years, the trash situation has taken a turn for the better. And one mid-Missouri group might have something to do with it.

 


Missouri State Parks

There's a place in the Ozarks where wild horses still roam and where the most adventurous of hikers can wander the wilderness for days.

For those listeners looking for a fall adventure, I took a day trip with my daughter to Missouri’s newest developed state park, Echo Bluff State Park, and brought along a recorder so we could create an audio postcard.


Hunter Gilbert / University of Missouri student

When the University of Missouri left the Big 12 Conference to join the Southeastern Conference, it effectively ended one of the biggest rivalries in college sports.

But, at least one MU club sport is making sure that rivalry lives on.

 


Kristofer Husted / KBIA

Roots N Blues N BBQ celebrated its eleventh anniversary last weekend with headliners like John Prine and Ryan Adams. But the festival wasn’t just about music. 

At this year’s festival, more than 30 different vendors set up shop to sell everything from Midwestern barbecue to handmade jewelry. And countless volunteers and staff members worked behind the scenes to make it happen.

Taylor Coleman was one of those people. She was the craft vendor coordinator this year. Some of the vendors traveled hundreds of miles from other states to sell their merchandise or services at the festival, and it was Coleman’s job to help the vendors in any way she could. 

 


Photo courtesy of Disney, Inc.

I grew up in Mexico City, Mexico. When I was younger, I would watch telenovelas with my friend Fernanda after school. We would both sit on her white, fur rug, our backpacks flung across the room.

For an hour every day, I saw all the women I could be: a ranchera keeping my land safe from a dastardly uncle, a time traveler, a queen. All the possibilities were in front of me.

 

Erin McKinstry / KBIA

It’s a hot day at Cooper’s Landing.

The Missouri River stretches to the right. A bluegrass band and crickets hum in the background. And people are scattered about listening, drinking beer and fanning away the heat. I glance around for Sara Dykman, who’s just arrived from Jefferson City by bike and who’s heading toward Mexico. I don’t see her, but I do see her bicycle.

The bike is bright pink and loaded down with stuff. Suddenly, Sara appears with a Mr. Pibb in hand, catching me in the middle of snapping photos.

Catherine Wheeler

As Dareth Goettemoeller cleaned up her art space at Orr Street Studios, she hugged a doll.

It was a giant, Raggedy-Anne-like doll, with a message over the heart that read, “Hug me.”

She said she made them for patients that just needed a hug.


Erin Schroeder / KBIA

For Regina Ruppert, it’s not easy to separate work and home life. She and her husband, Lee, opened Serenity Valley Winery outside St. Louis in 2006. Since 2011, the winery has been run from their property in Fulton.

“Never in a million years would I have dreamed of this, but the year our daughter graduated...I became an empty nester, turned 50 and had cancer all at the same time," Regina said. "And it wasn't a very good year. And my girlfriends suggested we look into doing this since my husband’s hobby was always winemaking.”

The Museum of Nebraska Art — or MONA — sits on the main drag of the small, central Nebraska town of Kearney. This winter, it has featured work by the state's Latina artists in the first show of its kind.

Alex George / University of Missouri

Alex George is a lawyer by day, and an author by even earlier in the day. The author of six books, including Setting Free the Kites – published by Penguin in February, is also organizing the Unbound Book Festival, in its second year running this April.

The festival will bring acclaimed writer Salman Rushdie, author of such books as Midnight’s Children and The Satanic Verses to Columbia.

George said that as the festival organizer, he was glad to bring someone of Rushdie’s celebrity to Unbound and is excited to see Rushdie in front of an audience.

There’s only one train line left in Concordia, Kansas (population just over 5,000), and it hauls grain. But more than a hundred years ago there were four train lines. Some of them were passenger trains, and in the 1880s, one carried a group of unaccompanied children from New York.

It stopped in nearby Wayne, Kansas, where strangers were waiting to choose the children.

On a bitterly cold afternoon early this winter, Patrick Overton was standing outside the historic Federated Church of Arrow Rock, Missouri, greeting people for the town’s annual folk sing-along. As visitors made their way through the afternoon cold to the warm glow of the church, Overton welcomed old friends, introduced himself to new ones, and joked that it was safe for all to enter because he would not be singing.

Off the Clock - Women Raising Alpacas, Creating Fabric

Mar 23, 2017
Catherine Wheeler / KBIA

Four women own and operate Heartfelt Alpaca Creations in Columbia, Missouri. Three of the women, Mary Licklider, Linda Coats, and Diane Peckham, all brought their alpacas into the business, while Carol Brown is a fiber artists who makes felt sheets. The women started the business about six years ago.

Why alpaca?

Licklider said the best alpaca fiber is as soft as cashmere. Additionally, it's a stronger fiber, but a similar weight.


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