Veronica Mohesky | KBIA

Veronica Mohesky

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45th District Missouri House Representative Kip Kendrick is forgoing his final term in office.

He ran unopposed for his seat in this year’s election.

“This is one of the more difficult decisions I've had to make. I've truly enjoyed every minute of being the representative,” Kendrick said.

Kendrick served for six years.

Kendrick said he is leaving to join State Senator-elect Greg Razer of Kansas City, Mo. as his Chief of Staff.

Razer is a Democrat for Missouri Senate District 7. He also served in the Missouri House with Kendrick for four years.

The Columbia Public School Board voted Monday night to move all schools online until at least January.

The Board voted to have middle schools and high schools remain online until January 19. They’ll return to a four-day week when they come back.

It also voted to have elementary schools, which were previously in-person, will go online starting Nov. 16 until January 11. All motions passed 6-1.

Several community members came to speak to the board before the decision.

We at KBIA have found strength in our community during the COVID crisis. In our series, “Where You’re At,” we’re talking to our family and friends to see how their coping during the pandemic. Here is Veronica Mohesky’s interview with Chess Grand Master and member of the MU chess team, Chris Repka. Chris is in his second year at MU as an international student from Slovakia.

So, Chris, how have you been doing since the pandemic started?

Well, the pandemic has been hard for all of us and I haven't been able to go home. And twice I've tried, twice, it failed. And I didn't get to. I go to the airport, but they didn't let me through the gate because my flight got canceled and that that part sucked. But I think I was really lucky to already know a lot of people here and I have a pretty good life here. So, I missed my family. But I think there are people that have it much worse. 

So COVID-19 has affected your family, but how has it affected chess? Have you played an in-person game since March?

No, not at all. All of my games were online, which is not the same. It's not the same feeling you also… there's little things that you miss, like when you're crashing your opponent then you see the distress on your opponent’s face or, or even like, yeah, simple things like that. And I also have to say that the pandemic kinda helped chess in some regard because a lot of people started watching online chess. We have record numbers of viewers all the time. I guess people are just so bored. They started watching chess.

Can you explain your background in chess?

Both of my parents were chess players. And they taught me chess. So basically, my first tournament was at the age of nine, we just kind of played for like the best chess players. And most of them start at the age of five, which is kind of surprising. And I remembered that my mom never wanted me to play chess because she saw that chess is hard and painful and you don't get that much reward because there's not as much money in it as in, let's say other sports. But after I started that, achieving some results, I think she started to be happy. But she was she never coached me which was which is kind of funny because she was six times second in the World Championships. So, she's a really good chess player.

How long has it been since you've seen your family or your mom?

It's been I've seen them on the winter break in January. And but it was only for a week. And since then I didn't come home. I know your grandpa passed away this over the summer.

Was that hard on you not being able to get home?

Yeah, definitely. I was supposed to get home before he passed, but they canceled my flight. And then I knew that I wouldn't make it because he basically passed away two days after the flight was canceled. So that that was kind of tough, but I was talking to him on the phone and I'm happy I got to say goodbye at least that way.

What's your support system here?

Coming here, I didn't know anyone. And I was lucky to have really good relationships within the team immediately. So, I wasn't here totally alone. I had some international chess players around me that I felt comfortable with. And Missouri is a really good place for people because people are really friendly, and it was easy for me to make new friends. I would say the transition went smoothly and I was kind of proud of that that I managed to come to a new environment and adjust.

Early voting, from mail-in to absentee, skyrocketed in Missouri this year.

In 2016, 282,150 Missourians voted by absentee ballot. This year, as of October 29, 723,058 Missourians have already submitted their absentee ballots to local election authorities.

According to the Missouri Secretary of State website, 60,377 mail-In ballots and 733,389 absentee ballots were requested in 2020. About 60% more Missourians are voting by absentee this year.

Early voting, from mail-in to absentee, skyrocketed in Missouri this year.

In 2016, 282,150 Missourians voted by absentee ballot.

This year, as of October 29, 723,058 Missourians have already submitted their absentee ballots to local election authorities.

According to the Missouri Secretary of State website, 60,377 mail-In ballots and 733,389 absentee ballots were requested in 2020. About 60% more Missourians are voting by absentee this year.

The majority of hunters in the US are men. Kelly Ott of Madison, Missouri wants to change that, by helping more women learn to hunt, fish and hike. KBIA’s Veronica Mohesky followed Ott on a recent hunt to learn about Women of the Outdoors, the organization she leads.

Derek Landes, left, wears glasses and a yellow plaid shirt. Cale Mitchell, right, wears clear-framed glasses and a yellow plaid shirt.
Veronica Mohesky / KBIA

Derek Landes and Cale Mitchell both work at Spectrum Health Care here in Columbia. Derek is a prevention educator and health services coordinator and Cale is the executive director.

They spoke about antibiotic resistant STIs and what simple steps people can take to keep themselves and their partners safe. These STIs have not been found in Missouri, but have been seen in some areas around the United States. 

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Derek Landes, left, wears glasses and a yellow plaid shirt. Cale Mitchell, right, wears clear-framed glasses and a yellow plaid shirt.
Veronica Mohesky / KBIA

Derek Landes and Cale Mitchell both work at Spectrum Health Care here in Columbia. Derek is a prevention educator and health services coordinator and Cale is the executive director.

They spoke about the rise of STIs in Columbia and how people can work to reduce those numbers.

Regional headlines from the KBIA newsroom including:

Veronica Mohesky

New MU head football Coach Eliah Drinkwitz said his first “M-I-Z” to fans, media members and university leaders Tuesday. Drinkwitz appeared at a press conference in the newly constructed south end zone at Memorial Stadium in Columbia.

“For me this is an opportunity of a lifetime,” Drinkwitz said. “And opportunities of a lifetime must be seized within the lifetime of an opportunity.”

Drinkwitz comes to MU after leading Appalachian State to a 12-1 record and a Sun Belt Conference Championship.

Veronica Mohesky / KBIA

The accessibility of porn on the internet has allowed kids of all ages to be introduced to sex. KBIA's Veronica Mohesky spoke with Derek Landes and Cale Mitchell of Spectrum Health Care about some of the common misconceptions about porn, and how it might not be the best option for sex education. 


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Denicia Dwarica, left, wears a gray blouse and has long, dark hair. Elizabeth Malm-Buatsi, right, wears a black turtleneck covered in gold flowers.
Veronica Mohesky / KBIA

Denicia Dwarica is a urogynecologist and Elizabeth Malm-Buatsi is a pediatric urologist at the University of Missouri’s Women’s and Children’s hospital.

They spoke about some of the common myths and misconceptions about urinary tract infections, or UTIs, during November – which happens to be Bladder Health Month.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Regional headlines from the KBIA newsroom including:

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom including:

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

Lily Kraxberger, left, wears a bright striped T-shirt. Dr. Jennifer Su, right, has on a sleeveless black top.
Veronica Mohesky / KBIA

KBIA's Veronica Mohesky sat down with OB/GYN Jennifer Su to discuss how she intertwines her faith into her work. Su is based out of Jefferson City and owns her own practicw. Hear their full conversation about online birth control and accessibility on Missouri Health Talks here

Regional headlines from the KBIA Newsroom including:

Regional headlines from the KBIA Newsroom, including: