Abortion | KBIA

Abortion

Official Says No Prosecutions for Women Seeking Abortions

Aug 19, 2019

A top Missouri prosecutor on Friday said he doesn't think any counterpart "in their right mind" would prosecute pregnant women under a new law that bans abortions at or after eight weeks of pregnancy.

Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys President Tim Lohmar, the St. Charles County prosecutor, said the organization reviewed the law as it was being drafted.

Donald Trump officially kicks off his 2020 re-election campaign with a rally in Orlando.  The event comes during a week where the president backtracks on a statement that he might not tell the FBI about offers of dirt on his opponents and his adversarial press secretary announces her resignation.

Trump launches re-election bid

Paul Sableman / CC BY 2.0

Missouri health officials said Friday an ongoing investigation into reported abortion complications is the reason they’ve withheld a license for the last clinic performing abortions in the state.

The Department of Health and Senior Services says it’s still seeking answers from the clinic about why patients were unaware that they remained pregnant after what the officials described as "failed surgical abortions."

In a statement, Planned Parenthood accused state officials of fearmongering, and maintained it has “bent over backwards to cooperate with [the department].”

Courtesy

Having a child renewed filmmaker Nanfu Wang's interest in China's one-child policy. In effect from 1979 to 2016, the restrictions on family size halted China's explosive population growth but have left the country with a rapidly aging population. 

From forced sterilizations and abortions to fines and propaganda campaigns, Wang examines how the policy was enforced in her new documentary, "One-Child Nation." The film won the grand jury prize at the Sundance Film Festival and recently screened at the True/False Film Festival in Missouri. 

On this special edition of Global Journalist, an in depth discussion between Wang and guest host Joshua Kranzberg about the film and the human legacy of a population control measure unmatched in history.


AP Photo

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at eugenics laws and forcible sterilization in both Japan and the U.S. – two countries with a surprisingly recent legacy of sterilizing people against their will.

In Japan, a postwar eugenics law in force until 1996 cleared the way for the government to sterilize 25,000 people deemed unfit to reproduce. In the U.S., 32 states passed laws allowing authorities to sterilize people without their consent - and as many as 60,000 people were forcibly sterilized, some as late as the 1970s.

Hundreds of the victims of these policies are still alive, and in many cases are still waiting for apologies and compensation from the governments that took away their ability to reproduce.


Yann Forget/Wikimedia Commons

In the next decade, India may pass China to become the world’s most populous country.

But there’s something odd about India’s population. 

At its last census in 2011, India had 36 million more men than women. As the population grows, the World Bank predicts there will be 51 million more men by 2031.

This is due in part to the widespread practice of sex-selective abortion and the gender-based neglect of young girls leading to higher mortality rates. In some cases, 'infanticide' of newborn girls is still practiced. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss what some activists call a 'gendercide' against women.


The Missouri House has given initial approval to a bill requiring both custodial parents to receive notice when a minor is seeking an abortion.

The legislation endorsed Wednesday would expand Missouri's current law that requires the written consent of one parent or guardian before girls younger than 18 can have abortions.

The Missouri Supreme Court is considering whether some of the state's abortion restrictions violate the religious beliefs of a woman who is part of the Satanic Temple.

Yann Forget/Wikimedia Commons

In the next decade, India may pass China to become the world’s most populous country.

But there’s something odd about India’s population. 

At its last census in 2011, India had 36 million more men than women. As the population grows, the World Bank predicts there will be 51 million more men by 2031.

This is due in part to the widespread practice of sex-selective abortion and the gender-based neglect of young girls leading to higher mortality rates. In some cases, 'infanticide' of newborn girls is still practiced. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss what some activists call a 'gendercide' against women.


Updated 7:15 p.m. July 24 with Senate reconvening — The Missouri General Assembly’s special session dealing with new abortion restrictions resumed Monday, though senators declined to take immediate action on Sen. Andrew Koenig’s bill. Several Republican senators were absent, which meant there weren’t enough votes to kill a Democratic filibuster.

When it goes into its second special session Monday, the Missouri General Assembly will focus on a frequent — and arguably, favorite — target: local control.

On issues ranging from gun rights to anti-discrimination regulations, Republican leaders have made it clear that they believe there should be a consistent law across Missouri. That’s why since 2007, they’ve approved bills to bar communities from enacting stricter gun laws, overturned Kansas City’s higher minimum wage (there’s an action pending against St. Louis’ higher wage, too), and tossed out Columbia’s plastic bag ban.

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Some St. Louis Catholics are suing the city over an ordinance that protects women against workplace discrimination based on whether they've had an abortion, used contraceptives or are pregnant.

The federal lawsuit was filed Monday on behalf of a group of Roman Catholic grade schools; a home for pregnant women; and a private company whose owner is Catholic. It seeks to stop the city from enforcing the ordinance, which opponents say makes St. Louis a sanctuary city for abortion.

The Archdiocese of St. Louis and the city are in a legal showdown over new provisions in St. Louis' anti-discrimination law regarding women's reproductive decisions. The archdiocese's schools and a private company, O'Brien Industrial Holdings, on Monday in federal court filed a lawsuit challenging a St. Louis ordinance that they say adds abortion rights supporters to a protected class, while discriminating those who are against abortions.

File Photo / KBIA

The Missouri House has passed stricter requirements for tracking fetal tissue after abortions.

The bill passed Monday with a 117-40 vote. It now moves to the Senate.

The proposal prohibits anyone from donating fetal tissue from an abortion to scientific research and sets stricter standards for pathologists to record and track fetal tissue after an abortion procedure.

AP Photo

President-elect Donald Trump has suggested that he’ll nominate U.S. Supreme Court justices that would overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark case that ended many abortion restrictions in the U.S.

If he succeeds, some states might have laws like that in the Republic of Ireland - which has the most restrictive abortion laws of any industrialized democracy.

Under the Eighth Amendment to Ireland's constitution, abortion is illegal in the heavily Catholic country in all cases except when the life of the woman is at risk. Both the woman or the doctor performing the abortion can face up to 14 years in prison if convicted.

But polls show the constitutional amendment underpinning the ban has lost popular support, raising pressure on Ireland's government to hold a referendum on the issue. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the effort to repeal Ireland's constitutional ban on abortion.


Missouri’s two Planned Parenthood affiliates on Wednesday morning sued to overturn the state’s highly restrictive abortion laws, a move expected since the U.S. Supreme Court struck down similar laws in Texas in June. 

The lawsuit, filed in federal court in Jefferson City, sets up a showdown over state statutes that were enacted in the wake of the Supreme Court’s landmark Roe v. Wade decision, which held that the right to an abortion in the early stages of pregnancy is rooted in the Constitution.

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Kristin Metcalf-Wilson said the activist in her couldn’t help leading cheers of “What do we want? Access. When do we want it? Always.” with those gathered Monday at Glenn’s Café to celebrate the Supreme Court’s decision in the case Whole Woman’s Health et al. v. Hellerstedt.

WallyG / FLICKR

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling is calling into question whether some Missouri abortion regulations will stand.

  Supreme Court judges ruled 5-3 Monday that some Texas regulations are medically unnecessary and unconstitutionally limit women's abortion rights.

Missouri has similar laws requiring abortion doctors to have privileges at nearby hospitals and clinics to meet hospital-like standards for outpatient surgery.

Spokeswoman Nanci Gonder said Missouri's attorney general is reviewing the ruling.

missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

Measures on union fees and changes to abortion policy are pending in the final week of Missouri's 2016 legislative session.

Missouri Capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

 The Missouri House has passed a controversial "personhood" measure opponents say could ban abortion, including in cases of rape and incest.

Missouri Capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A proposed state constitutional amendment that would virtually outlaw abortion in Missouri is one step closer to being debated by the full State House.  

j.stephenconn / flickr

Republican Missouri lawmakers are pushing measures opponents say will ban abortions, as well as fetal-tissue donation from those procedures.

Missouri Capitol
File Photo / KBIA

 Minors who want an abortion in Missouri would need to tell both their parents under a bill that has passed the House.

David Shane / Flickr

The Missouri House has given initial approval to a bill that would tighten the requirements for a minor to get an abortion.

The Planned Parenthood clinic in Columbia has stopped performing medically-induced abortions. The Columbia Tribune reports that the clinic ceased offering the abortions Monday. 

A Columbia Planned Parenthood facility likely will lose the ability to perform medication-induced abortions.

Dan Verbeck / KBIA

Missouri's Democratic attorney general says an investigation by his office found no evidence that Planned Parenthood in St. Louis is selling fetal tissue from abortions.

Chris Koster's report released Monday said a review of more than 300 abortions performed in June found that all tissue had been properly incinerated.

Koster launched an investigation following state and national outrage, primarily by Republicans, about undercover videos released by anti-abortion activists. The videos show Planned Parenthood officials discussing the transfer of fetal tissue to researchers.

Pages