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journalism

Travis McMillen/Reynolds Journalism Institute

From the New York Times' reluctance to use the word "lie" or "racist" to describe statements by President Trump to what the news outlet has learned from its coverage of the 2016 election, Executive Editor Dean Baquet speaks candidly about the controversies and achievements of his five-year tenure leading the Times' newsroom.

On a special edition of Global Journalist, Baquet addresses how he hopes to diversify the Times' newsroom, rock-bottom levels of public trust in the media and how the Times' rising subscription sales are enabling new investments in journalism.


AP Photo

Once a refuge for foreign journalists fleeing repression at home, the U.S. risks losing that status.

Like other migrants, journalists who come to the U.S. seeking safety are much more likely to wind up in prisons or federal detention centers - sometimes for months - as their immigratiom cases are considered. Their claims are also being heard by immigration courts that are much more likely to deny asylum requests than they were even a few years ago.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the stories of a Cuban journalist and a Mexican journalist who both found themselves locked up in a country they hoped would provide safety. 


Courtesy

On this special edition of Global Journalist, an extended interview with award-winning foreign correspondent and author Peter Hessler.

In 1996, the U.S. Peace Corps sent the Columbia, Mo. native to a city in central China to teach English at a teacher's college. During that period, few Westerners had spent much time in the city, and Hessler's experiences became fodder for his widely acclaimed 2001 memoir, "River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze."

Hessler later returned to China and spent seven years as a correspondent for the New Yorker, becoming one of the most well-known foreign journalists in the country. Hessler went on to publish three other books, win a MacArthur "genius" grant, and eventually moved his family to Egypt to continue reporting for the New Yorker.


AP Photo

Local newspapers have been eviscerated over the last 15 years as social media and the internet have destroyed their business model. Yet all is not doom and gloom.

In the third part of our series on the global crisis in local news with the Index on Censorship, a look at new business models to support local journalism as well as how robot reporters might yet save their human counterparts.

We'll also get a look at efforts to keep "deep fake" videos from going viral on the internet and further distorting our public conversation.


YouTube says it's banning hateful and extremist speech from neo-Nazis, white supremacists and terrorists.  But that's a tough task.  And in the past few days, the social media giant has also taken down videos -- at least temporarily -- from people fighting hate speech by quoting some of the perpetrators.  Is the solution to bad speech really less speech? 

AP Photo

All around the world, the local news organizations that report on municipal and regional governments are in decline. 

In the first installment of a special series with the Index on Censorship magazine, a look at news deserts in the U.S., silent zones in Mexico and a poll measuring the confidence of British journalists in their ability to hold the powerful to account. We'll also get a closer view at what the disappearance of local journalists means for democracy and accountability in government.


AP Photo

The killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in October generated days of international headlines. Unfortunately, when journalists are killed for their work their deaths rarely attract such attention.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the targeted killings of two investigative journalists in European democracies.  At the time of their deaths, Slovakia's Ján Kuciak and Malta's Daphne Caruana Galizia were probing government corruption and the influence of Italian organized crime families in their respective countries. In both cases, justice has been slow in coming.

Yet if the intention of those who killed Kuciak and Galizia was to halt their reporting, that effort failed. In both cases, journalists from a number of media outlets organized to continue the work of their slain colleagues.


On this week's show, a look at the life of a pioneering female journalist. Fortuna Calvo-Roth was born in 1934 to a Jewish family in Paris, but was raised in Lima, Peru. There she fell in love with the news business during World War II - and came to admire American newspapers like the New York Times and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

So she left Peru and came to the Missouri School of Journalism in the 1950s, where she managed to graduate with honors at just age 19. Despite facing discrimination, she went on to a distinguished career as a correspondent for a number of major Latin American newspapers and later as news executive for the Brazilian publishing group Vision Inc.

Yet journalism was just one chapter of her career - she went on to enjoy success as a theatrical producer, a publisher and as the co-founder of an audiobook label.


Courtesy

On this special edition of Global Journalist, an extended interview with award-winning foreign correspondent and author Peter Hessler.

In 1996, the U.S. Peace Corps sent the Columbia, Mo. native to a city in central China to teach English at a teacher's college. During that period, few Westerners had spent much time in the city, and Hessler's experiences became fodder for his widely acclaimed 2001 memoir, "River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze."

Hessler later returned to China and spent seven years as a correspondent for the New Yorker, becoming one of the most well-known foreign journalists in the country. Hessler went on to publish three other books, win a MacArthur "genius" grant, and eventually moved his family to Egypt to continue reporting for the New Yorker.


Kavanaugh accuser Christine Blasey Ford
Fox News

Psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford says she wanted to remain anonymous when she told her Congresswoman and U.S. Senator this summer that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh had sexually assaulted her at a party while both of them were in high school.  But her name leaked.  And Ford's testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee next Monday could make or break Kavanaugh's elevation to the nation's highest court.

Kim Jong Un and President Trump shake hands at Singapore summit
CNN

Judge rules on AT&T merger

A federal district judge rejects the Trump administration's arguments against the proposed merger of telecom and satellite TV provider AT&T and media content giant Time Warner.  Will the government appeal?  What impact is the decision likely to have on consumers and other attempts at so-called "vertical" mergers?

Steve Overly, “Judge clears AT&T-Time Warner merger opposed by Trump,” Politico

President Trump used his first State of the Union speech to call for unity, but once again associated illegal immigration with drugs and murder.  Congressional Republicans cheered him.  Democrats largely sat on their hands and grumbled during parts of his immigration remarks.  What did the news media have to say before and after the address?

(RJI/Travis McMillen)

On a special edition of Global Journalist, Meredith Artley, editor in chief of CNN Digital, talks about the impact of social media on the news, competing with start-ups like BuzzFeed, and envisions a future of immersive news.

CNN Digital, the world's most viewed online news site in 2015, was recently awarded a Missouri Honor Medal for distinguished contributions to journalism.


On this special edition of Global Journalist, CBS News' White House correspondent Bill Plante examines the changes to the news business and the biggest stories of his 52-year career.

 Plante, a 2015 recipient of the Missouri Honor Medal and numerous other journalism awards, has covered every presidential campaign since 1968.  


Gistory

More and more companies, especially in the media, are trying to find new ways to attract millennials. And one former University of Missouri student is going directly to the source with her new journalism tech start-up, run by and for millennials.

Courtesy NPR

As a co-host of NPR's flagship "All Things Considered," Audie Cornish's voice is heard by 12 million people everyday. On a special edition of Global Journalist, she takes us behind the scenes of one of the most influential radio shows in the U.S. and talks about the future of public radio.

In the last 24 hours I’ve seen journalists all over the country grappling with the senseless murder of two TV journalists working in Roanoke, VA. Many of us see ourselves in them: young, energetic, aspiring. Taking on the crummy hours because it’s worth it to get your start on your career, knowing you won’t win any awards for your routine assignments.

The New York Times has had to walk back its story on a "criminal" probe of Hillary Clinton's private email server while the paper is vigorously defending another of its exclusives...on abuses in the nail salon industry.  The first Republican presidential debate is only a week away.  Some wonder whether all the scrambling to meet the Fox News criteria for inclusion is worth the trouble.  More bad news for the newspaper business: major layoffs and poor performance with minority employment.  Media companies are embracing a new revenue source that raises ethical questions.  And research shows "visual" news sites are more successful.

Each weekday morning, promptly at 7:20 a.m., Robyn King's students go live.

"Are we ready?" King asked on a recent Monday, holding up a single finger pointed at two wide-eyed students sitting at a desk in front of a tripod-mounted iPad. "OK, here we go."

Dick Preston / KRCG

My longest job ever was just under four years. It's hard for me to fathom working in the same place for ten years. It is a rarity these days to find someone who has stayed in the same job for more than a decade. This week's guest on Thinking Out Loud has worked for 53 years in the mid-Missouri television market. Forty-seven of those years he has spent with one organization. This week on Thinking Out Loud, we talk with KRCG Anchor and News Producer Dick Preston.


Honoring the Kyiv Post

Jan 8, 2015
Kyiv Post

This episode of Global Journalist is audio only.

We interviewed Brian Bonner and Katya Gorchinskaya of the Kyiv Post, which received a 2014 Missouri Honor Medal, about their careers and the future of journalism. The Kyiv Post is an English language, independent newspaper that became a prime source of information for the west when Russian actions in Ukraine escalated.

Jacky Naegelen / Reuters

Catch our show today at 6:30pm on KBIA

Terrorists Kill 12 at Paris Paper

Three gunmen killed 12 people and injured several more at a weekly Paris newspaper that has satirized Islam and the prophet Mohammed.

Nicholas Vinocur and Antony Paone, Reuters, "At least 12 dead in Paris attack on satirical newspaper"

The University of Missouri is known for it’s School of Journalism. Every year, hundreds of freshmen from across the country come to school at MU to learn about news or sports broadcasting. But KBIA’s Jason Hoffman found one freshman who’s career in sports radio has an added challenge: He's blind.


Censorship in Turkey

Oct 23, 2014
turkey protest
Emrah Gurel / AP Photo

  After 11 years as prime minister, Recip Tayyip Erdogan became Turkey's first directly-elected president in August. Under Erdogan’s tenure, Turkey’s economy has grown significantly. The country’s main minority group, the Kurds, have gained new rights. And a military with a history of meddling in politics has been kept in its barracks. But press freedom groups like Reporters Without Borders and the Committee to Protect Journalists have consistently criticized efforts by Erdogan’s AK Party to limit freedom of expression and of the press.

islamic-state-still
Courtesy of VICE

On this week's program, we are looking at VICE. No – not the bad habits we all have – but the media organization that is challenging common perceptions of what is and isn't journalism. Our guests:

The New York Times

  The New York Times this week ran a series of editorials calling on the federal government to repeal the ban on marijuana.  A brave, game-changing move that shows the country's leading newspaper acting like one, or just another sign of how behind public opinion the mainstream media are these days?  And what difference will it make?

The Editorial Board, The New York Times, "Repeal Prohibition, Again"

Roman Boed / Flickr

  While Western media have for days been focusing on Russian-backed separatists as the culprits behind the missile attack on MH 17 over eastern Ukraine, the people of Russia have been hearing different stories from their government-controlled media.

KBIA

In this recent series of commentaries for KBIA.org, Missouri student journalists recount a few of life’s confusing lessons. Led by Missouri School of Journalism Professor and storytelling master Berkley Hudson, these 11 student commentators took not only pen to paper but also got in front of the microphone, to talk out these essays that touch on life, relationships, growing up and striking out, among other issues. Enjoy!

The past week has been a busy one for stories about national security and how the media have handled those stories.  A judge rules the National Security Agency's phone records collection program is probably unconstitutional.  Meanwhile, the plaintiff in that lawsuit gets into an on-air battle with a CNN anchor and analyst.  60 Minutes airs what many critics consider a puff piece on the NSA.  The AP and Washington Post publish a story connecting a missing American to a rogue CIA program in Iran.  And American leaker Edward Snowden gets the nod from many for "person of the year."

@moon_melanie / twitter

Many media and journalism-school types have been following the dustup over KPLR anchor/reporter Melanie Moon's behavior while covering the Ryan Ferguson press conference earlier this week right after his release from prison. Joy Mayer at the Columbia Missourian cataloged the exchange with Moon in this Storify, so you'll need to read that first for this piece to make much sense. As Mayer has pointed out, many news outlets and twitterers are focusing on the ethical conversation around Moon hugging Ryan Ferguson and his father Bill, and taking a photograph with Ryan at the press conference. This is an interesting conversation, and the area of journalism ethics is blurry sometimes. But the more important conversation to have here really is the area that is not blurry: one about good, responsible journalism.

Just to get this out of the way briefly here, I'm going to side with the curmudgeons on the hug, and say for a variety of reasons that is unprofessional. I'm not calling for a ban on journalist hugs, but I will summarize by saying I think intention is important. Hugs for consolation can make sense in some circumstances, for celebration, not so much. I would contend that if you're doing your job right as a journalist you will already have boundaries that make interactions like this something you'll never feel comfortable with. I also will emphasize the importance of avoiding the appearance of conflict of interest, and the Society of Professional journalists would back me up on that one.

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