Mackenzie Martin | KBIA

Mackenzie Martin

mackenzie@wxpr.org

Now that we’re spending more time at home, you might find yourself looking out your window more.

It’s unlikely you’ll get as lucky as one Kansas City woman did, though.

Shannon Lindgren was a little nervous when she and her husband had to start working from their 5th floor apartment on the Plaza. To give herself some space, she decided to convert their dining room into a makeshift office. In hindsight, this idea was a very good one.

Shortly after getting set up, Lindgren spotted a bird nest, with eggs, on the window ledge.

To try to prevent the spread of COVID-19, most arts organizations in metro Kansas City have canceled performances or closed, at least temporarily. That's hitting revenue streams pretty hard, including independent artists who rely on crowds or personal contact to make their money.

“It’s an incredibly tough time,” said Maite Salazar, a poet and writer.

We know very little about how the coronavirus pandemic will play out in Kansas City. That’s making a lot of people really anxious.

“I see uncertainty as the core of the panic that we’re seeing right now,” says Katie Kriegshauser, director of the Kansas City Center for Anxiety Treatment.

Most people under quarantine in Wuhan, China, where the outbreak started, didn't end up getting COVID-19. They did, however, develop high levels of anxiety, isolation and psychological distress.

Segment 1: "I'm going to continue to work really hard, I'm just going to do it from home," said U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids.

Despite deciding to self-quarantine after potential exposure to the novel coronavirus, Kansas' U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids said she's still working to ensure any stimulus package out of the Capitol prioritizes people who need it most. She also emphasized the importance of practicing social distancing, listening to public health officials and taking the coronavirus situation seriously.

Segment 1: "I'm going to continue to work really hard, I'm just going to do it from home," said U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids.

Despite deciding to self-quarantine after potential exposure to the novel coronavirus, Kansas' U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids said she's still working to ensure any stimulus package out of the Capitol prioritizes people who need it most. She also emphasized the importance of practicing social distancing, listening to public health officials and taking the coronavirus situation seriously.

Segment 1: Rye's Megan Garrelts is a semi-finalist for a James Beard Award for Outstanding Pastry Chef. 

While some pastry chefs make a name for themselves for crazy concoctions, a significant portion of Garrelts' success is the result of elevating standbys like pies and cinnamon rolls.

Segment 1: Can we really expect people to stay home from work when they're sick if they don't get paid sick leave?

In Missouri and Kansas, employers are not required to provide sick leave. What does that mean as we watch the coronavirus spread and workers are told to self-quarantine? 

Segment 1: How voters are feeling the day after the 2020 Missouri Democratic Primary.

Segment 1: In 1990, Deanna Dikeman took a photo of her parents waving goodbye to her as she drove away.

She continued to take these pictures for decades and today, what started as random keepsakes is now a series of photos spanning through her father’s death until her mother passed away. Since releasing “Leaving and Waving,” she has also received comments from people who can see moments from their own lives, reflected in hers.

Segment 1: Inequality in the story of lead contamination and lead removal.

Homes in Kansas City's oldest and one-time affluent neighborhoods are now lived in by people without the resources to remove the lead paint commonly used before its dangers were known. Plus, how the rise and fall of lead mining has affected a part of Missouri known as the Lead Belt. 

Kansas City is becoming more welcoming for black women who want to start their own businesses.

Adrienne Haynes, the managing partner at the business law firm SEED Law, says there’s more diversity in the entrepreneurial community today than in 2015, when she created the Multicultural Business Coalition with a few other organizations. Half of her clients are black women.

Segment 1: What if instead of the Confederate flag, the symbol of the Civil War was a worn out dish rag?

The current exhibit at H&R Block Artspace is about the little-known Confederate Flag of Truce, a dish towel used by Confederate forces to surrender the Civil War in Virginia in 1865. It's a counterweight to the more controversial Confederate flag, seen by many as a symbol of racism.

Young Voters 2020

Mar 5, 2020

Less than a week before the Missouri preisdential primaries, on the day that the Democratic field narrowed to a final two candidates, Kansas City area voters under 25 years old shared their journeys watching the process unfold so far. What are the issues that matter to them the most, and why? What do the candidates look like through that lens? Our roundtable includes two democrats, one republican, and two unaffiliated voters. A political science professor adds context to the young people's stories at the end of the hour.

Guests:

Segment 1: A new exhibit at the Fed highlights a surge of businesses owned by black women.

Between 2002 and 2012, the number of businesses owned by black women in America increased 179%, while overall business ownership only increased by 20%. A report by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City dug into the data to understand the phenomenon. What inspired these business owners? What pushed them?

There are a lot of options for Asian cuisine in Kansas City: banh mi sandwiches, tasty curries, Thai noodles, ramen, hot pot, fried rice, shrimp and sweet potatoes, fresh sushi. And that's just a taste! Our food critics share their recommendations for the best Asian dishes in town. Plus, we get some advice on cooking Thai food at home from someone who grew up with it.

Segment 1: Local musician AY has a new song out about his experience as a male victim of domestic abuse.

When he was going through the experience, he didn't know where to turn for help or how to talk about it. Now he's sharing his story to open up the conversation about who gets abused by who. Researchers and support organizations say that while intimate partner violence can happen to anyone, it's harder to get help and find the right resources if you're a man.

Last July, Frank Sereno, who lives in Kansas City, Missouri's Waldo neighborhood, gathered his neighbors and threw a three-month anniversary party for a pothole, complete with birthday cake.

He was fed up. He had reported this specific pothole, which was outside his house, to City Hall's 311 Action Center three months earlier to no avail. After the story of the pothole birthday party went viral, the pothole was fixed almost immediately.

Phil Dixon is more than an expert on the Negro Leagues. He's an ambassador for stories that might've been lost without him. 

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Negro Leagues, we're taking some time to get to know one of the people who knows more about its history and players than anyone else. Before Phil Dixon was the author of nine books and a cross-country traveler, he was just a kid playing baseball in segregated Kansas City, Kansas obsessed with baseball cards.

Here's the deal with potholes in Kansas City and beyond.

It feels like potholes are everywhere in Kansas City, especially if you listened to Mayor Quinton Lucas' recent speech. That's why we're devoting a full hour to studying the pothole from different angles with people who are taking matters into their own hands. After all, potholes may be universally hated, but they don't impact everyone in the same way.

If you appreciate your own company but dining solo in a restaurant intimidates you, you're not alone. But it doesn't mean you shouldn't give it a try.

"I love dining alone. I'm almost evangelical about it," Liz Cook said on KCUR's Central Standard. "One of the reasons I love it is that I'm alone so seldom in my daily life.... This is a time to completely carve out for yourself."

Segment 1: Remembering the charismatic restaurant critic who never romanticized food.

It's the first food show since we got news of longtime KCUR food critic Charles Ferruzza's death, so we're taking a moment to remember the special sauce that made Charles Charles one last time.

Segment 1: A key player in Kansas City's hip hop community died unexpectedly.

In addition to being a producer for Ces Cru, Justin "Info Gates" Gillespie started the Beat Academy of Kansas City at the Plaza Academy, touching a lot of teens. Now the hip hop community is banding together to carry on his legacy and make sure those teens will continue to be supported.

Segment 1: Who gets to tell what stories? 

Controversy over a novel called “American Dirt” led to a canceled book tour—a week before author Jeanine Cummins was set to come to Kansas City. Critics have a problem with the fact that Cummins is white, yet wrote a book about a Mexican family trying to make it across the US-Mexico border.

Segment 1: MU and other universities are tracking attendance through a cellphone app.

A tribute to the Kansas City tax attorney who spent 40 years hosting a music show devoted to rock and roll.

Bill Shapiro recently died at the age of 82. To remember him, we rebroadcasted his final episode of Cyprus Avenue, the "smart" rock and roll show he hosted on KCUR on Saturday nights. His abridged final broadcast includes snippets of some of his favorite tunes and reflections on his personal relationship with music.

Kansas City can sometimes be a city of extremes. It has more than 100 barbecue restaurants and counting, yet it's also seen an explosion of more plant-based and vegetarian cuisine, including restaurants that are completely free of meat.

But as people across the country eat more vegetables for the benefit of their own health as well as that of the environment, it's spurring creativity on the culinary scene.

Segment 1: Meet Kansas City's Veggie Burger Artist

Zaid Consuegra at Pirate's Bone is known for the colorful veggie burgers he's painstakingly developed to be both pretty and tasty. He was recently profiled in Bon Appetit with his photo next to a headline that identified him as "The Undocumented Chef." He shares the story of his life and his burgers.

Segment 1: Research shows white-sounding names curry favor in academic settings.

Xian Zhao's name means something to him. It means something to his parents. That's why he won't adopt what he calls an "anglo name." But his own research suggests he might be missing opportunities because of that.

  • Xian Zhao, researcher, University of Toronto

Segment 2, beginning at 14:47: A recent Calvin Arsenia album is a milestone in his professional and personal growth.

Segment 1: A Kansas native moderated the last Democratic debate in Iowa.

Brianne Pfannenstiel grew up in Lawrence and got her first job in journalism at the Kansas City Star. Now that she's in a state with a huge voice in this year's election, we wanted to know: How does she feel the Midwest is represented in national discourse today? What does she think of Iowa's role specifically? And, what is it like to moderate a national debate?

Segment 1: Meet the bar owner who doesn't think the customer is always right.

Pages