Election 2016 | KBIA

Election 2016

Sarah Kellogg/ KBIA

A month has passed since Donald Trump was elected as the 45th President of the United States. In these past few weeks, many Democrats and even some Republicans are wondering how this happened. Author Thomas Frank visited the University of Missouri a couple of days after the election and offered a few explanations.

Frank believes that there is no one complete reason as to why Trump won the nomination, but he believes that Trump understood how many Americans felt going into the election.

Well.  I did not see this election coming.  I take no comfort in being in good company.  The evidence was in plain sight.  I chose to discount or ignore it, because I was wed to old ways of thinking.  Clearly many of the analytics we use in elections are obsolete or irrelevant or both.  This applies especially to polls, whose problems I have been talking about in this space for some time.

Forget the pollsters, forget the prognosticators, forget the pundits.

They were all wrong.

Now that the election is behind us, our panel breaks down what happened in America’s newsrooms – how the coverage came together and where so many natural storylines were dropped. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Michaela Tucker
KBIA

“This is crazy.”

The words of 10-year-old Elena Hoffman seemed to echo the sentiment of many of the partygoers at Ragtag Cinema’s election night watch party on November 8.

The party, which was billed as a bi-partisan gathering, drew mostly Clinton-supporters. Attendees could spend their evening waiting for results at either the bar, the large theater that aired CNN coverage or the small theater that aired the PBS telecast.

Tracy Lane, the executive director of Ragtag, estimated that nearly 200 people were in attendance by 8 p.m.

Scott Harvey

GOP Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri fended off a tough challenger to keep his job Tuesday.

The 66-year-old Blunt beat Democrat Jason Kander, the Secretary of State, in what had been a close race.

Blunt met his supporters at a Springfield hotel early Wednesday morning and talked about that remarkable Republican sweep.

“Never in the history of the state, have we reelected majorities in the Missouri General Assembly, the House and the Senate, reelected a senator and elected five statewide Republican officials,” Blunt said.

Residents in Missouri's 47th District voted to reelect state Rep. Chuck Basye, R-Rocheport, to his second term in political office. The victory came after his opponent, Democratic retired teacher Susan McClintic, conceded the race to the incumbent representative on Tuesday's election night. But memories of Basye's of his narrow win over John Wright in 2014's race had him a bit uneasy before the election. 

Jason Rosenbaum / St. Louis Public Radio

Democrat Judy Baker lost the race for Missouri State Treasurer to Republican Eric Schmidt.

Baker is not new to running for political office having served in the Missouri House of Representatives from 2004 to 2008. During this time Baker served on the Healthy Missouri Caucus. She then served as the Health and Human Services regional director of Missouri, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska from 2009 to 2011.

Baker had hoped to combine this experience with her experience as a former economics professor to address the causes poverty in Missouri.

student center
Riley Beggin / KBIA

Nearly 11 million new people have become eligible to vote since the last presidential election. On a university campus, they’re easy to come by.

At the MU student center, students gathered to watch as the results rolled in from their first-ever presidential vote.

Photo Provided

Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler has been elected as the Representative for the Fourth District of Missouri. She based her campaign on a platform of agricultural issues, healthcare, and federal government involvement.

She is critical of the Affordable Care Act and seeks to limit the powers of the measure. Hartzler is a member of the Armed Services committee in the Missouri House of Reps.

Hartzler,  a supporter of Donald Trump says she thinks he will "bring real change that Washington needs and so I hope that by the end of the night, he ends up prevailing. We don’t need four more years of the economy being stagnant, and with failed foreign policy that Hillary Clinton will bring with her.”

Missouri Capitol Building
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri is looking to hire a new chief financial officer. The State Treasurer’s office is one of the five executive positions up for grabs on Tuesday, Nov. 8.

Three candidates are running for the treasurer’s office: Republican Eric Schmitt, Democrat Judy Baker and Libertarian Sean O'Toole.

Judy Baker is a former state representative. Her platform for state treasurer centers improving food security, access to banking services in underserved areas and cutting back on income inequality.

Talking Politics: Missouri Tobacco Tax Increase Fails To Decrease Smoking Rates

Nov 7, 2016
Yutao Chen

Jordan Hester is a sales associate at We B Smokin & Drinkin in Jefferson City, Missouri and has been a smoker for 12 years. He spends his days selling the one thing that he is trying to quit: cigarettes.

Hester has worked there for two years, and is on a first-name basis with his customers. When there is an increase on the price of cigarettes, Hester is the first person to hear their complaints.

“They would notice a tax increase real quick,” Hester said. “They notice if you ring up a lighter too many.”

Next week I’ll give you most of my predictions for key elections.  I’ll give you one today: Hillary Clinton will win the presidential election. 

I realize this revelation will send few of you to the fainting couch.  Most observers are predicting this outcome, and with good reason.

I have my reasons as well and I thought I’d look back at how I’ve been tracking the presidential race from this spot on the dial over the last year.

Last October I said: “Candidates who have the best organizations usually prevail.”  Yes, that’s one of the reasons Clinton will win.

  Dr. Gordon Christensen is a newcomer to the political scene. He’s running on the Democratic ticket as challenger to Missouri’s Fourth District Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler.

Christensen is a physician and retired professor from the University of Missouri in Columbia. While this is his first time running for political office, Christensen served as chief of staff of the University of Missouri Hospital and as MU faculty council chair.

Is it November 8 yet?

 

On the Planet Tralfamador Americans are tuning into presidential debates that are enlightening, illuminating and helpful to voters.  There, on the other side of the galaxy, Americans are watching ads on TV and social media that are professionally and substantively addressing the issues that separate the candidates. There Americans are turning out to vote in record numbers in a national show of civic pride and duty.

 

 

Alison Barnes Martin

Martha Stevens left her social work and advocacy positions to run for the District 46 House of Representatives seat. Her job experiences gave her ideas for public policies on health care coverage. For Stevens, health care expansion is one of the most critical issues facing Missourians.

Stephen Webber
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

One of the most important issues on District 19 State Senate Democratic candidate Stephen Webber’s platform is strengthening funding for the University of Missouri, and K --12 education as well. He says this is important since education is a major employer in the district.

“But it's also more than that; it's also who we are, in terms of our cultural values, and how we identify ourself; we're an education community, and so it's important in all facets of this area,” Webber said.

Gubernatorial Candidates Spar Over Tax Returns, Debate

Oct 5, 2016
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

The two Missouri gubernatorial candidates engaged in a heated back-and-forth on Tuesday, when Democratic nominee Chris Koster accused Republican Eric Greitens of waiting too long to release his tax returns.

Koster’s campaign said if Greitens doesn’t release his returns, they’ll break off negotiations about an October gubernatorial debate.

Greitens had at one point said he would release his tax returns when Chris Koster released his. Koster did so on Sep. 29, but Grietens still hasn’t.

Can you endure one more commentary about last week’s presidential debate? If not, tune to sister station KMUC for some fine classical music.

 

Still listening?

 

 

 

Caleb Rowden
File Photo / KBIA

  Republican State Representative Caleb Rowden is serving a second term in the Missouri House for District 44 and is running for the state senate seat in District 19, previously held by State Senator Kurt Schaefer. Rowden’s platform focuses on economic development, low taxes, government accountability and strengthening Missouri’s public education system.

The University of Missouri and public K-12 education serve as the centerpiece of Rowden’s campaign.

Challiyan / Flickr

The Missouri Supreme Court says voters will get to decide whether to raise cigarette taxes to benefit early childhood programs.

Judges ruled Tuesday that the proposal will stay on the Nov. 8 ballot.

The measure would phase in a 60-cent-per-pack increase of the state's lowest-in-the-nation tobacco taxes. It also would raise fees by 67 cents a pack for off-brand cigarettes, in addition to the tax hike.

Cigarette giant Reynolds American Inc. is backing the proposal.

Daniel Aubuchon

You can find Don Waterman working at the Columbia Bass Pro Shops, checking people out at the register or helping customers find what they’re looking for. But now he’s casting his line for the state legislature.

Waterman is running as the Republican candidate for the District 46 House of Representative’s seat. He got his first taste of politics by working for Danie Moore’s campaign in the 2008 state election primaries. Now, as a candidate, Waterman wants to tackle Missourians’ access to mental health facilities.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Democrat Chris Koster has tallied another significant endorsement from an agricultural group in his race for Missouri governor.

The Missouri Soybean Association announced Thursday it is throwing its support behind Koster’s bid over Republican Eric Greitens. The endorsement is a big win for Koster as it will likely help him with the traditionally conservative vote of rural Missouri.

AP

Republican nominee Donald Trump has commanded blanket media coverage since his run for U.S. president took off last year.

But it's not just Americans who have been glued to their screens when Trump's face appears. Government leaders and ordinary people around the world have taken notice as well.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we talk to reporters from around the world to gather the international reaction to Trump's proposals to ban Muslim immigration, cancel trade deals and consider pulling the U.S. out of NATO.


File / KBIA

 The four Republicans seeking the GOP nomination for Missouri governor are set to face off in a debate on Monday that will be broadcast in the state's two largest cities as the run-up to the August primary intensifies.

The debate will feature retired businessman John Brunner, former Navy SEAL Eric Greitens, former U.S. attorney and Missouri House Speaker Catherine Hanaway and Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder.

The debate is hosted by St. Louis television station KTVI, and co-sponsored by WDAF-TV in Kansas City and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Columbia Buses Offer Free Rides for Election Day

Mar 14, 2016
Columbia bus
Columbia Transit

ComoConnect busses will be free to ride Tuesday and on every Election Day for the rest of the year.

(Will be updated as campaign-finance reports are filed)

Republican Eric Greitens, an author and former Navy SEAL, appears to have bested his rivals for governor in both parties with his latest fundraising numbers.

Greitens’ latest campaign report, filed Friday, showed that he has raised $1.5 million since Oct. 1. That puts him slightly ahead of the $1.4 million reported by Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster, a Democrat and the longstanding fiscal frontrunner in the crowded battle to succeed outgoing Gov. Jay Nixon.

Photo courtesy of the Office of Gov. Jay Nixon

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says he's backing fellow Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton's run for president.

Talking Politics - Political Commentary

Oct 27, 2015
Vote Here sign
File Photo / KBIA

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics.  On this week’s talking politics we've brought back Columbia College political science professor, Dr. Terry Smith.

This week he is here to point out some of the similarities he has noticed between the Volkswagen scandal and the upcoming 2016 presidential election and its nominees.


David Shane / Flickr

A former Missouri Democratic state lawmaker has formed a campaign committee for a bid for treasurer in 2016.

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