Missouri Health Talks | KBIA

Missouri Health Talks

Audrey Aton and Cortney Bouse sitting on a bench outside on MU’s campus.
Isabel Lohman / KBIA

Recently, there have been multiple challenges to abortions in the state. In late May, Governor Parson signed a ban on abortions after eight weeks  - and Missouri could soon become the first state without an abortion provider as the St. Louis Planned Parenthood clinic is currently trying to retain their abortion license in court.

Caryn Meyer / VOX Magazine

This week’s Missouri Health Talks is a collaboration with Vox Magazine.

Last fall, Matthew and Christy Nevels, who already had six children, adopted their five foster children. Making them a family of 13. They spoke with reporter Mimi Wright about speaking some of the challenges they have encountered trying to balance all of their children’s needs.

You can read more of the Nevels’ story in the June issue of Vox Magazine - available now around town and online: “A local couple with an abundance of love — and kids — adopts more children.”

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Melanie Hickcox, left, wears a gray hoodie. Bree Broadus, right, wears a black jacket and a pink T-shirt.
Jamie Hobbs / KBIA

Melanie Hickcox and Bree Broadus work together here in Mid-Missouri. Melanie is the SNAP Project Manager for Feeding Missouri and Bree is the SNAP Outreach Coordinator for The Food Bank for Central & Northeast Missouri

They both work to provide access to SNAP benefits, otherwise known as food stamps, to inmates getting ready to reenter society – even helping people with paperwork and applications before they’re released.

They spoke about why food stamp access is so important – especially among this vulnerable population.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Kevin Wehner, left, wears glasses and a bright red flannel shirt. Scott Miniea, right, wears a tan shirt.
Regan Huston / KBIA

Kevin Wehner and Scott Miniea both have backgrounds in education, but now, they work for nonprofit organizations in Columbia and use their teaching skills to help people navigate the healthcare system.

Kevin is a Certified Application Counselor for Central Missouri Community Action and Scott is the Executive Director of the Primaris Foundation. They spoke about some of the biggest issues for people when trying to enroll in health insurance and how people can take advantage of free resources to get the best possible health care.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Libby Brockman-Knight, left, wears a bright red blazer and smiles into the camera. Gaurav Kulkarni, right, wears a black shirt and multi-colored tie and looks into the camera.
Trevor Hook / KBIA

Libby Brockman-Knight and Gaurav Kulkarni both work at Compass Health Network in Columbia. Brockman- Knight is the Deputy Chief clinical officer of substance use disorder services and Kulkarni is a psychiatrist who specializes in addiction.

They spoke about treatment for substance use disorders - specifically alcohol addiction, which according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, as of 2015, more than 15 million American adults have an alcohol use disorder.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org.

Cindy Polfelt, left, wears a denim jacket and a floral shirt. She stands next to her daughter, Jessica Hosack, left, who wears a dark denim jacket and a striped shirt.
Trevor Hook / KBIA

Cindy Polfelt has lived in Columbia for six years.

Cindy’s mother has Alzheimer's, and since her father passed away, Cindy has taken on the role of her mother’s personal caretaker. She feeds and clothes her mother every day, and can’t leave her house unless she finds someone to watch her mother – even then, it’s only for a few hours at a time.

Cindy says that it has affected her social life, and her independence. She spoke with her daughter, Jessica Hosack, about some of the stresses of being a caretaker. 

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Cindy Polfelt, left, wears a denim jacket and a floral shirt. She stands next to her daughter, Jessica Hosack, left, who wears a dark denim jacket and a striped shirt.
Trevor Hook / KBIA

Jessica Hosack and her mother, Cindy Polfelt, live in Columbia. Jessica began using opioids at parties when she was a teenager, and this quickly turned to regular opioid use.

Jessica went on to deal with a substance use disorder for a decade, and after seeking treatment several times, she was able to enroll in a month-long rehabilitation program at the McCambridge Women and Children’s Treatment Center. She has been in recovery for more than two years.

Jessica and Cindy spoke about Jessica’s breaking point, and how her mental health played into her substance abuse. 

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org.

Jacey Schank, left, is the Treasurer of Period @ Mizzou and Jane Kielhofner, right, is in charge of External Outreach. Both women were part of the students who founded the Mizzou chapter of Period.
MaKenzie Bagley / KBIA

Jane Kielhofner and Jacey Schank are both on the executive board of a University of Missouri menstrual health student group called Period @ Mizzou. The group is focused on discussing and advocating for menstrual health, and is part of a larger national organization.

Jane and Jacey have known each other for many years, and they spoke about their organization, and why it’s important. They also spoke about some legislative changes they are working toward like House Bill 747, which aims to change "the laws regarding the taxation of feminine hygiene products, diapers, and incontinence products.”

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org.

Robert Harrison sits – wearing a white shirt and blue tie. He smiles into the camera. There is an American flag behind him.
Trevor Hook / KBIA

Robert Harrison was born in St. Louis and has dealt with a substance use disorder throughout his life. After living drug-free for more than 20 years, Robert became the executive director of an alternative sentencing program in Columbia aimed at low-level drug offenders. He left his post two years later.

He spoke with KBIA’s Trevor Hook about why he first came to Columbia and sought treatment.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

In this excerpt from KBIA’s Intersection, Melanie Hickcox and Monica Palmer with Feeding Missouri, a coalition of Missouri food banks, discuss the stereotypes and stigmas surrounding food insecurity.

They spoke to KBIA for Missouri Health Talks.

Audrey Aton and Cortney Bouse sitting on a bench outside on MU’s campus.
Isabel Lohman / KBIA

Audrey Aton and Cortney Bouse both live in Columbia. Audrey is senior at the University of Missouri studying public health and is the founder and president of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Mizzou. Cortney is a grassroots organizer for Planned Parenthood Great Plains and teaches sex education at her church.

They first met when Audrey applied for an internship with Planned Parenthood, and over the last two years, they have worked side by side as advocates. They spoke about some of their efforts to make sure kids, teen and adults have access to basic sex education. 

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Alexia Diamond / KBIA

Alissa Steward and Terilyn Harris are both juniors at Mizzou and are also roommates. While they live together now, they come from very different hometowns. Alissa is from El Dorado Springs, Missouri, which has a population of approximately 3,500 and Terilyn is from Atlanta.

They spoke about the differences and similarities that exist when it comes to access to healthcare in their hometowns.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Robyn Schelp and Molly Myers sitting inside Robyn’s home.
Isabel Lohman / KBIA

Robyn Schelp and Molly Myers are both moms of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities here in Columbia.

Robyn has three sons, and her 11-year-old has an unknown genetic disorder. Molly has an 8-year-old son who is missing a part of his brain, twin girls who were born prematurely and another three-year-old daughter.

They spoke about their ongoing fight to get their children the therapies they need because, in Missouri, legislation only requires insurance companies to cover diagnosis and treatment for people with autism spectrum disorders.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Monica Palmer, left, has short brown hair and wears a blue shirt under a black blazer. Melanie Hickcox, right, has short blonde hair and wears a gray sweater.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Melanie Hickcox and Monica Palmer both work at Feeding Missouri, a coalition of Missouri food banks. Melanie is the SNAP project manager, and Monica is the communications manager.

During the partial government shutdown in January, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as SNAP or food stamp benefits, distributed February benefits at the end of the month in January.

Melanie and Monica spoke about how this disruption of normal benefits is still impacting food insecure Missourians and local food pantries.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Christina Jackson, along with her mother, Paula, and sister, Andrea, met me at an event called “The Art of the Scar” that was hosted by the Missouri Kidney Program in September.

Christina was diagnosed with lupus after high school, and then following issues with insurance coverage, she experienced kidney failure, numerous seizures, a stroke and a kidney transplant in her twenties

The family spoke about some of the ways they would like to see the healthcare industry change. 

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Christina Jackson, center, stands flanked by her mother, Paula Jackson, left, and her older sister, Andrea Jackson, right.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Christina Jackson, along with her mother, Paula, and sister, Andrea, met me at an event called “The Art of the Scar” that was hosted by the Missouri Kidney Program in September.

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

JT Thomas is a senior at the University of Missouri and is studying biology and business. We met at an event called “The Art of the Scar” that was hosted by the Missouri Kidney Program in September.

JT was diagnosed with kidney failure at the age of 20, and he spoke about the role that community played in his health and transplantation journey.

He is now four years post-transplant.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org.

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Mark Kirchhoff is the homeless youth program coordinator for Rainbow House in Columbia, and Kelsey Louder is the former shelter director.

They spoke about some of the hardest parts of their jobs working with young people experiencing homelessness.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org.

Verna Laboy, left, wears a dark blue t-shirt and smiles into the camera. Annabelle Simmons, right, wears a bright yellow shirt and smiles into the camera.
Zia Kelly / KBIA

Verna Laboy and Annabelle Simmons both work with Live Well By Faith, a community health program that targets chronic disease among African Americans in Boone County.

Verna has run the program since it was established by the Columbia/Boone County health department in 2016. The program supports health ministries at 17 black churches in the area by providing health programming, training and resources for people in the congregation, and leaders within each church help run programming and data collection.

Annabelle Simmons is a health lifestyle coach at St. Luke United Methodist Church, and they spoke about some of the more creative ways they try to inspire positive change within their church-based health ministries.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Verna Laboy, left, wears a dark blue t-shirt and smiles into the camera. Annabelle Simmons, right, wears a bright yellow shirt and smiles into the camera.
Zia Kelly / KBIA

Verna Laboy and Annabelle Simmons both work with Live Well By Faith, a community health program that targets chronic disease among African Americans in Boone County.

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

JT Thomas is a senior at the University of Missouri and is studying biology and business. We met at an event called “The Art of the Scar” that was hosted by the Missouri Kidney Program in September.

JT was diagnosed with kidney failure at the age of 20, and he spoke about how his experiences with kidney failure and his time in dialysis has changed his outlook on life.  

He is now four years post-transplant.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Bob and Susan Winkelmann and their family friend, Anne Fitzsimmons, live here in Columbia. These three have been friends for a long time – they’ve worked together and raised their kids in the neighborhood that they share. We met at an event hosted by the Missouri Kidney Program in September.

Bob has polycystic kidney disease, and these three spoke about their shared kidney transplantation journey.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

John and Donna LaBelle stand side-by-side. John, left, is wearing a patterned shirt and a leather vest.  Donna, right, has long light-colored hair and wears a black shirt.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

John and Donna LaBelle are from Fulton, and we sat down in September at an event called “The Art of the Scar” that was hosted by the Missouri Kidney Program.

When John was in his early twenties in the 1980s, he unexpectedly experienced kidney failure.  Not long after, in 1981, John underwent a kidney transplant where they also removed his spleen.

They spoke about how even 37 years after his successful kidney transplant, there are still health concerns they face every day.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Laurie Hines and Ted Glasgow have been together for many years. Ted is an accomplished bodybuilder - a six-time Mr. Missouri – but a few years ago he experienced kidney failure.

Ted was on dialysis for several years, but now Laurie is a living kidney donor and the director of the Missouri Kidney Program, and Ted is two and a half years post-transplant.

They reflect on their experiences and give some advice for others facing dialysis and organ transplants.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Laura Goddard, left, wears a gray t-shirt, has long dirty blonde hair and smiles into the camera. Leona Greer, right, wears a blue patterned shirt and a light pink headscarf and smiles into the camera.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Leona Greer and Laura Goddard both work at the Randolph County Health Department in Moberly. Leona is the Nutrition, Breastfeeding and WIC Coordinator, and Laura is the lead secretary in the clinic.

They spoke about how programs like the new “Babies at Work” program the health department is piloting could benefit other families and other businesses.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org.

Laura Goddard, left, wears a gray t-shirt, has long dirty blonde hair and smiles into the camera. Leona Greer, right, wears a blue patterned shirt and a light pink headscarf and smiles into the camera.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Leona Greer and Laura Goddard both work at the Randolph County Health Department in Moberly. Leona is the Nutrition, Breastfeeding and WIC Coordinator, and Laura is the lead secretary in the clinic.

Laura has an infant daughter, Anna, that she was able to bring to work with her for the first several months through the new “Babies at Work” program that the health department is piloting.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Grethen Maune, left, wears a bright purple shirt and smiles into the camera. DeAnna Quietwater Noriega, right, wears a brown knit cardigan and smiles.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

DeAnna Quietwater Noriega and Gretchen Maune, who’s a friend of mine, both live in Columbia and are blind.

They recently spoke about some of their health conditions that exist separately from their blindness and about some of the additional barriers they come up against in the health care system as a result of their disability. 

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Glen Moritz, left, wears a green-striped polo and black rimmed rectangular glasses. Tamarr Maclin, rights, wears a gray t-shirt, has a close-shaved black beard and wears black rimmed glasses. They smile into the camera.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Glen Moritz and Tamarr Maclin live in Kirksville and run an organization called “AM Housing,” which was named after and inspired by Glen’s son, Andrew, who passed away from cancer.

They are working toward opening a homeless shelter in town and said they have encountered some obstacles while trying to open this shelter.

They spoke about how they are working to spread awareness in their community, and about what they want the shelter to be like once they open their doors.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Glen Moritz, left, wears a green-striped polo and black rimmed rectangular glasses. Tamarr Maclin, rights, wears a gray t-shirt, has a close-shaved black beard and wears black rimmed glasses. They smile into the camera.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Glen Moritz and Tamarr Maclin live in Kirksville and run an organization called “AM Housing,” which is named after Glen's son, Andrew, who died of cancer at 33. They are working toward opening a homeless shelter in town. 

They spoke about the things that have motivated them to work in the field of rural homelessness.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Samantha Dyroff, left, wears a gray sweatshirt and has dark brown hair. Megan Anderson, right, wears a gray, long-sleeved athletic shirt and has light blonde hair. They smile into the camera.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Megan Anderson and Samantha Dyroff are both medical students at the University of Missouri. They both work with MedZou, a student-run health clinic here in town. When we spoke to them, Megan was a second-year student and the transgender health coordinator, and Samantha was a first-year medical student and ran the specialty services for MedZou.

They spoke about a recently opened specialty clinic at MedZou that offers free and inclusive healthcare for transgender Missourians, and about what that clinic has meant to some of their patients. 

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org.

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