Views of the News

Wednesdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Each week, KBIA brings you a roundtable discussion about the media. Host Amy Simons and regular panelists Mike McKean and Earnest Perry from the Missouri School of Journalism provide analysis, commentary and criticism. Subscribe to us on iTunes

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Kavanaugh accuser Christine Blasey Ford
Fox News

Thursday is shaping up to potentially be the biggest news day of the year. In Washington, Judge Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein meets face-to-face with President Donald Trump following a New York Times exclusive.

CBS fires the head of 60 Minutes for threatening a reporter in a text message, not because he's been accused of #sexualharassment. Plus, a prominent researcher says news organizations need to do more to avoid being manipulated by extremists, The New York Times apologies to U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, and The Weather Channel's Mike Seidel is mocked for his Hurricane Florence performance. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

Kavanaugh accuser Christine Blasey Ford
Fox News

Psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford says she wanted to remain anonymous when she told her Congresswoman and U.S. Senator this summer that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh had sexually assaulted her at a party while both of them were in high school.  But her name leaked.  And Ford's testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee next Monday could make or break Kavanaugh's elevation to the nation's highest court.

Why didn’t NBC run Ronan Farrow’s Harvey Weinstein story last summer when it could? Why did the network encourage him to find another outlet for the piece? It seems Farrow, his producer and the network’s chairman have different takes as to why. Who’s telling the truth? Also, two Reuters journalists are sentenced to a lengthy prison term for reporting in Myanmar, why the 30th anniversary “Just Do It” campaign is leading to Nike boycotts, and what the FCC chairman is saying about regulating social networks. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Damon Kiesow and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Why didn’t NBC run Ronan Farrow’s Harvey Weinstein story last summer when it could? Why did the network encourage him to find another outlet for the piece? It seems Farrow, his producer and the network’s chairman have different takes as to why.

The tributes and remembrances of Sen. John McCain continue to flow. His relationship with the media wasn’t always friendly, but it was one of cooperation and mutual respect. We’ll remember him on this week’s program. Also, are the Google News search results rigged against President Trump? Why he seems to think so. And, the Kansas City Star’s new subscription model. Get ready sports fans, this one’s for you!  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The tributes and remembrances of Sen. John McCain continue to flow. His relationship with the media wasn’t always friendly, but it was one of cooperation and mutual respect. We’ll remember him on this week’s program.

Mary Papenfuss, Huffington Post: “NBC cuts to awkward ‘Talent’ scene after solemn McCain report

Why did a Florida judge came down hard on the South Florida Sun Sentinel for publishing information it published about the Parkland school shooter that it obtained legally? Also, President Trump’s reaction and the coverage of breaking news that came in threes, how a congressional candidate justified keeping reporters out of a meeting she opened to the public and ESPN’s effort to repair its relationship with the NFL. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Why did a Florida judge came down hard on the South Florida Sun Sentinel for publishing information it published about the Parkland school shooter that it obtained legally?

Who is unhinged? It’s the title of Omarosa Manigault-Newman’s new book and it’s got just about everyone – including the president – talking. We’ll talk about how the hype built up through the week and why it’s not really selling. Also, covering the white nationalist movement without fanning the flames, how Twitter will define “dehumanizing speech,” and a unified effort nationwide to publish editorials fighting the Trump administration’s claims of “fake news.” From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

Courtesy Simon & Shuster

Who is unhinged? It’s the title of Omarosa Manigault-Newman’s new book and it’s got just about everyone – including the president – talking. We’ll talk about how the hype built up through the week and why it’s not really selling.

Layoffs at Tronc’s New York Daily News nearly decimated the newspaper’s staff, leaving some to claim the nation’s biggest city a local news desert. How can it be that local news is dying in a city of more than 10 million people? Also, when candidates and special interests turn journalists’ work into endorsements and mixed messages about misinformation on Facebook.

via Flickr user Annie Mole

Layoffs at Tronc’s New York Daily News nearly decimated the newspaper’s staff, leaving some to claim the nation’s biggest city a local news desert. How can it be that local news is dying in a city of more than 10 million people?

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

President Trump is home from Helsinki and hearing the reaction to his joint news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin, and backing off some of Monday’s statements. How much did what he saw and heard in the news media influence that? Also, Sacha Baron Cohen’s new satirical mockumagazine show angers the right, the FCC deals Sinclair a blow, and a federal judge reverses an earlier order prohibiting the LA Times from printing documents wrongly posted to a federal website.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

President Trump is home from Helsinki and hearing the reaction to his joint news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin, and backing off some of Monday’s statements.

David Beard, Poynter: “Trump visit ‘exhausting’ British press corps

Brian Stelter, CNN: “Trump ratchets up ‘fake news’ rally cry overseas during UK visit

A well-known security blogger revealed the name of one her sources to the FBI – unsolicited. It’s something most wouldn’t do without court order, and still, there are reporters who will go to jail to protect their sources. So, why did Marcy Wheeler do it? Also, why KMIZ-TV apologized for decisions made during its coverage of the so-called “fireworks war” in Columbia last week, why an edited public service announcement is being blamed for the deaths of dozens in India, and bringing journalism to life… through live theater. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Michael Coghlan

A well-known security blogger revealed the name of one her sources to the FBI – unsolicited. It’s something most wouldn’t do without court order, and still, there are reporters who will go to jail to protect their sources. So, why did Marcy Wheeler do it?

Marcy Wheeler: “Putting a face (mine) to the risks posed by GOP games on Mueller investigation

President Donald J. Trump's summit with Kim Jong Un was historic, but did it help more than it hurt? Plus, could too much coverage of Anthony Bourdain's suicide lead to copycats? We'll also discuss IHOP's attention-getting name change and the judicial decision that gives the green light to a big media merger. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel.

A surprise twist in the Greitens invasion of privacy case earlier this week -- did anyone see it coming? Many in the White House are trying to stop all the leaks, and not the plumbing kind. Plus, print reporters cashing in on television appearances, new sports gambling laws and we ask the question: who won't be covering this weekend's Royal wedding festivities? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

The staff of the Denver Post has an unlikely advocate: the city’s mayor. He says the city needs the Post and its staff of dogged reporters, and is helping in its fight against its hedge fund owners. Also, Tronc recognizes the new union at the Chicago Tribune, NBC’s parent company makes a run for 21stCentury Fox and what has some of Charlie Rose’s accusers thinking he’s planning a comeback. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The staff of the Denver Post has an unlikely advocate: the city’s mayor. He says the city needs the Post and its staff of dogged reporters, and is helping in its fight against its hedge fund owners.

Chuck Plunkett, Rolling Stone: “Op-Ed: I stood up for ‘The Denver Post’ and was forced to resign

Maybe it’s time to retire the White House Correspondents’ Dinner? Michelle Wolf’s 15-minute act has many in our profession questioning the mission and purpose of the annual gala, and whether it’s time to put an end to it. Also, Missouri’s attorney general digs in on the governor, Tom Brokaw fights back against allegations of sexual misconduct and AM radio’s resurgence in Puerto Rico. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Maybe it’s time to retire the White House Correspondents’ Dinner? Michelle Wolf’s 15-minute act has many in our profession questioning the mission and purpose of the annual gala, and whether it’s time to put an end to it.

Sean Hannity is a commentator, not a journalist. But that still begs the question, did he owe it to viewers to disclose he’d discussed personal legal matters before it was revealed in open court? Also, coverage of the air strikes in Syria, James Comey’s first television interview, and what’s next for Governor Greitens. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared before Congress to answer questions about users’ privacy on the social media platform. At least one senator inquired as to why users don’t seem clear on how their data is collected and used. Could it lead to regulation?

via Flickr Brian Solis

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared before Congress to answer questions about users’ privacy on the social media platform. At least one senator inquired as to why users don’t seem clear on how their data is collected and used. Could it lead to regulation?

Who’s really at fault? Cambridge Analytica, Facebook, or the millions of users around the globe who relied on a social platform to keep their data safe and protected? As Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is called before lawmakers in the U.S. and the U.K. to answer to data breaches affecting more than 50 million users, it’s a fair question to ask. When the product is free, are you the product? Also, a return to #MeToo ground zero, as the Weinstein Company files for bankruptcy, tronc’s Michael Ferro retires amid misconduct allegations, and why Stormy Daniels might be able to get out from under that non-disclosure agreement afterall. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user www.quotecatalog.com

Who’s really at fault? Cambridge Analytica, Facebook, or the millions of users around the globe who relied on a social platform to keep their data safe and protected? As Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is called before lawmakers in the U.S. and the U.K. to answer to data breaches affecting more than 50 million users, it’s a fair question to ask. When the product is free, are you the product?

After more than 130 years of some of the most stunning photojournalism ever published, the editors of National Geographic acknowledged that for decades, much of that has been racist in its coverage of people of color. What spurred this confession and what commitment is there among today’s staff to change? Also, did O.J. Simpson admit to killing his ex-wife and her friend on a FOX special Sunday night, Tucker Carlson’s special report on the plight of men in America and reports of a deal between the Obamas and Netflix? What might Obama TV look like? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

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