Views of the News | KBIA

Views of the News

Is the war in #Afghanistan winnable? The Washington Post released an investigation three years in the making that shows that military strategies used over 18 years were known to be flawed. Is this the Pentagon Papers of 2019? Also, Report for America’s effort to hire 250 local #journalists, Devin Nunes newest defamation lawsuit and reactions to Peloton’s cringeworthy commercial. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

Is the war in Afghanistan winnable? The Washington Post released an investigation three years in the making that shows that military strategies used over 18 years were known to be flawed. Is this the Pentagon Papers of 2019?

Courtesy Amy Simons

Six students from the University of Missouri's Honors College participated in a 16-week tutorial under the direction of Missouri School of Journalism professor Amy Simons on media criticism during the Fall 2018 term. For their final project, the students produced and hosted their own special edition of KBIA-FM's program, "Views of the News."

Prince Andrew sat down for an interview with the BBC this weekend, explaining his involvement with Jeffrey Epstein. Why go on the record in this way? Also, the latest from the Trump impeachment hearings, how a collaboration between Mizzou and The University of Kansas came to be, and southeast Missouri’s special place in journalism history. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News.


Prince Andrew sat down for an interview with the BBC this weekend, explaining his involvement with Jeffrey Epstein. Why go on the record in this way? 

Impeachment hearings will soon be underway in the U.S. House of Representatives. What advice does our panel have for journalists covering it? Also, CBS News fires an employee for leaking video obtained while working at ABC, John Oliver comments on a series of lawsuits and an apology from Northwestern University journalism students frustrates many in the profession. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News.


Impeachment hearings will soon be underway in the U.S. House of Representatives. What advice does our panel have for journalists covering it? Also, CBS fires an employee for leaking video obtained while working at ABC, John Oliver comments on a series of lawsuits and an apology from Northwestern University journalism students frustrates many in the profession.

The Ragtag Film Society severed ties with The Crossing, Columbia, MO on Friday over a message delivered in a sermon that was hurtful to many in mid-Missouri’s #transgender community. Also, the author of last year’s anonymous #Trump “resistance” op-ed in the New York Times is back with a new book, the growing number of local news deserts, here and abroad, and family-friendly workplace policies that address every phase of life. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News. 


The Ragtag Film Society severed ties with The Crossing on Friday over a message delivered in a sermon that was hurtful to many in mid-Missouri’s transgender community. Also, the author of last year’s anonymous Trump “resistance” op-ed in the New York Times is back with a new book, the growing number of local news deserts, here and abroad, and family-friendly workplace policies that address every phase of life. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

Did it take President Donald Trump too long to condemn the violence in a meme-like video shown at one of his Florida resorts this weekend? Twitter says it went too far, and has removed the user from its site, yet YouTube says the video doesn’t violate terms of service. Where is the line?

The president’s latest attack on the press gets louder, as calls for more details surrounding the call with the Ukrainian president identify. How does his finger pointing erode the public’s trust in news reporting? Also, the official end of the White House press briefing and the sources of the biggest threats to journalism as identified by the publisher of the New York Times. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News. 

The president’s latest attack on the press get louder, as calls for more detail surrounding the call with the Ukrainian president identify. How does his finger pointing erode the public’s trust in news reporting?

Journalists around the world are remembering Cokie Roberts for her decades of service to the profession. The legendary reporter and political commentator seen on ABC News, heard on NPR and read in newspapers across the country died Tuesday at the age of 75. Also, CNN refuses advertising from JUUL and other #ecigarette companies, Shane Gillis hired and fired from 'Saturday Night Live' and 25 years of 'Friends.’ From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Monique Luisi: Views of the News.

Cokie Roberts signs books before the discussion in the LBJ Auditorium.
Courtesy of the LBJ Library

Journalists around the world are remembering Cokie Roberts for her decades of service to the journalism profession. The legendary reporter and political commentator seen on ABC News, heard on NPR and read in newspapers across the country died Tuesday at the age of 75.

The ripple effects of disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein widen, as the head of the revered head of the MIT Media Lab resigns after accepting a donation from Epstein. What did he know at the time of the gift? Also, new guidelines for newsrooms to protect female #journalists from online harassment, controversy at NPR over the coverage of #race and the #WorldTradeCenter on film, 18 years after the September 11th terror attacks. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News.

The ripple effects of disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein widen, as the head of the revered head of the M.I.T. Media Lab resigns after accepting a donation from Epstein. What did he know at the time of the gift?

Teens, tired of how the news media covers stories that matter to them, take matters into their own hands. This week, a look at several teen-run news and information sources and what they’re telling us about the Gen Z audience. Also, the ongoing feud between The New York Times columnist Bret Stephens and a professor at The George Washington University; a Playboy #journalist sues to get his White House credentials back, and a California bill seeking rights for #gigeconomy workers. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News.

Photo by Eepeng Cheong via Unsplash

Teens, tired of how the news media covers stories that matter to them, take matters into their own hands. This week, a look at several teen-run news and information sources, and what they’re telling us about the Gen Z audience.

It’s been 400 years since the first slave ship landed on shores of what would become the United States of America. This week, a look at how The New York Times Magazine commemorated the moment, and the lasting impact it could have on the reframing of American history. Also, Mark Halperin’s bumpy road to redemption, how some journalists got caught up in campaign fundraising, and remembering a respected journalist killed in a plane crash while on the job. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News.

Courtesy New York Times

It’s been 400 years since the first slave ship landed on shores of what would become the United States of America. This week, a look at how the New York Times Magazine commemorated the moment, and the lasting impact it could have on the reframing of American history.

Subscriptions soar following a Baltimore Sun editorial in response to President Trump’s attack on the livability of the city. Are Americans voting with their dollars? Also, a look at the presidential debates, an investigative report halted after a key source was murdered and the fine line between curation and plagiarism. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Subscriptions soar following a Baltimore Sun editorial in response to President Trump’s attack on the livability of the city. Are Americans voting with their dollars?

ESPN doubles down on its no politics policy after radio host Dan Le Batard shared his disgust with President #Trump’s racist tweets on the air (The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz). Also, GateHouse Media makes a play for Gannett, Robert Mueller appears before Congress, and we remember best-selling author George Hodgman. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Monique Luisi and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

#Missouri judge ruled former Gov. Eric Greitens’ use of the disappearing chat app #Confide did not violate the state’s#SunshineLaw because it functions similarly to a telephone. But does it? Also, the status of a Memphis reporter released from #ICEcustody, a candidate’s request a female reporter have a male chaperone on a reporting trip, and Netflix’s decision to re-edit '13 Reasons Why.’ From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri judge ruled former Gov. Eric Greitens’ use of the disappearing chat app Confide did not violate the state’s Sunshine Law because it functions similarly to a telephone. But does it?

Migrant children in a Texas border facility have been living in squalor, without access to sanitation supplies such as soap and toothpaste. Reporters' access to the facility, and others like it, has been limited, making reporting on the conditions difficult. Also, why it seemed rape allegations against President Trump were downplayed, an exaggeration of tourist deaths in the Dominican Republic , and Twitter's decision to end geotagging on tweets. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Migrant children in a Texas border facility have been living in squalor, without access to sanitation supplies such as soap and toothpaste. Reporters’ access to the facility, and others like it, has been limited, making reporting on the conditions difficult.

President Trump goes back to the future for the launch of his re-election campaign. He accuses The New York Times of treason and urges his departing press secretary to run for governor of Arkansas. Plus, a discussion of the media’s over-reliance on polls in their campaign coverage. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: it’s KBIA 91.3 FM ’s Views of the News.

YouTube’s ban on hate speech produces mixed results as Congress puts Big Tech under the microscope. Newspapers want lawmakers to help them compete with Google and Facebook. Seeing (and hearing) is definitely not believing when it comes to the latest examples of deep fakes. And Volkswagen hopes Simon & Garfunkel – plus a new diesel micro-bus – will help you forget about Diesel-gate. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News.

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